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Adjustment among mothers reporting same-gender sexual partners: a study of a representative population sample from Quebec Province (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162178
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Danielle Julien
Emilie Jouvin
Emilie Jodoin
Alexandre L'archevêque
Elise Chartrand
Author Affiliation
Département de psychologie, University of Quebec at Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Centreville, Montreal, QC, Canada. julien.danielle@uqam.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bisexuality - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parenting - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We examined the well-being of mothers and non-mothers reporting exclusive opposite-gender sexual partners (OG), same-gender sexual partners (SG), or both (BI) in a representative sample of 20,773 participants (11,034 women) 15-years-old or older from the population of Quebec province in Canada. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire and SG and BI women (n = 179) were matched to a sample of OG women (n = 179) based on age, income, geographical area, and children (having at least one 18-year-old or younger biological or adopted child at home). We assessed social milieu variables, risk factors for health disorders, mental health, and quality of mothers' relationship with children. The findings indicated a sexual orientation main effect: Mothers and non-mothers in the SG and BI group, as compared to their OG controls, were significantly less likely to live in a couple relationship, had significantly lower levels of social support, higher prevalence of early negative life events, substance abuse, suicide ideation, and higher levels of psychological distress. There were no Sexual Orientation X Parenthood status effects. The results further indicated that sexual orientation did not account for unique variance in women's psychological distress beyond that afforded by their social milieu, health risk factors, and parenthood status. No significant differences were found for the quality of mothers' relationship with children. SG-BI and OG mothers with low levels of social integration were significantly more likely to report problems with children than parents with high levels of social integration. We need to understand how marginal sexualities and their associated social stigma, as risk indicators for mothers, interact with other factors to impact family life, parenting skills, and children's adjustment.
PubMed ID
17665300 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes in mothers with affective psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78089
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2007 May;9(3):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
MacCabe James H
Martinsson Lennart
Lichtenstein Paul
Nilsson Emma
Cnattingius Sven
Murray Robin M
Hultman Christina M
Author Affiliation
Section of General Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. j.maccabe@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Source
Bipolar Disord. 2007 May;9(3):305-9
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Case-Control Studies
Demography
Female
Fetal Diseases - epidemiology
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Affective psychosis has its peak incidence during the childbearing years, but little is known about the effects of the illness on pregnancy. We investigated risks of preterm delivery (PTD), low birthweight (LBW), births of infants small for their gestational age (SGA), stillbirth and infant death in births to mothers with affective psychosis using a nested case-control design within a cohort of 1,558,071 singleton births in Sweden during 1983-1997. METHODS: Using prospectively collected data from population registers, we compared the pregnancy outcomes of 5,618 births to women with affective psychosis with the outcomes of 46,246 births to unaffected mothers. RESULTS: Mothers with affective psychosis had elevated risk for giving birth to preterm, small or growth-retarded babies. The risk for stillbirth and infant death during the first year of life was not significantly higher. The risks were greatest in mothers receiving hospital treatment for affective disorder during pregnancy: (i) preterm delivery: odds ratio (OR) = 2.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.71-4.17; (ii) SGA: OR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.34-4.16; (iii) low birthweight: OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.31-3.76; and (iv) stillbirth: OR = 2.19; 95% CI = 0.55-8.76. After adjustment for covariates, particularly smoking, the risks were attenuated but remained significant. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with affective psychosis, some of which may be preventable.
PubMed ID
17430307 View in PubMed
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Ante- and perinatal circumstances and risk of attempted suicides and suicides in offspring: the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127072
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Anneli Pouta
Matti Isohanni
Pirkko Räsänen
Pirjo Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate those ante- and perinatal circumstances preceding suicide attempts and suicides, which have so far not been studied intensively.
Examination of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,742), originally based on antenatal questionnaire data and now followed up from mid-pregnancy to age 39, to ascertain psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring and suicides or attempted suicides in the offspring using nationwide registers.
A total of 121 suicide attempts (57 males) and 69 suicides (56 males) had occurred. Previously unstudied antenatal factors (maternal depressed mood and smoking, unwanted pregnancy) were not related to these after adjustment. Psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring were the risk factors in both genders. When adjusted for these, the statistically significant risk factors among males were a single-parent family for suicide attempts (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.62-8.50) and grand multiparity for suicides (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.15-6.18). When a psychiatric disorder in females was included among possible risk factors for suicide attempts, it alone remained significant (OR 15.55, 8.78-27.53).
A single-parent family was a risk factor for attempted suicides and grand multiparity for suicides in male offspring even after adjusting for other ante- and perinatal circumstances and mental disorders in the parents and offspring. Mothers' antenatal depressed mood and smoking and unwanted pregnancy did not increase the risk of suicide, which is a novel finding.
PubMed ID
22327374 View in PubMed
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Are sociodemographic factors and year of delivery associated with hospital admission for postpartum psychosis? A study of 500,000 first-time mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29669
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A. Nager
L-M Johansson
K. Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Center for Family Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):47-53
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Demography
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Postpartum Period - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis and the explanatory variables age, educational level, marital status and year of delivery. METHOD: All Swedish first-time mothers (n = 502,767) were included during a 12-year period and followed for first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios, adjusted for the explanatory variables. RESULTS: Older age and being a single mother implied an increased risk of first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis among first-time mothers. Educational level was not associated with first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis. During the 1990s, when a reduction in psychiatric beds occurred, first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis decreased significantly. CONCLUSION: Certain sociodemographic factors are associated with first hospital admissions due to postpartum psychosis. Untreated postpartum psychosis due to fewer psychiatric beds could have hazardous effects on mothers and their children.
PubMed ID
15952945 View in PubMed
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Assessment of parental overt and covert control of child's food intake: a population-based validation study with mothers of preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264591
Source
Eat Behav. 2014 Dec;15(4):673-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Paulina Nowicka
Carl-Erik Flodmark
Derek Hales
Myles S Faith
Source
Eat Behav. 2014 Dec;15(4):673-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Eating - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - epidemiology
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Overt and covert control are novel constructs representing two different parental feeding practices with regard to the child's ability to detect them. Preliminary research indicates that covert control is linked to a healthier diet and lower child weight status. In this study, we report the first psychometric validation of the original measures of overt and covert control outside the UK in a large sample of parents of preschoolers.
Based on records from the population register, all mothers of 4-year-olds (n = 3007) from the third largest city in Sweden, Malmö, were contacted by mail. Out of those, 876 returned the measures of overt and covert control together with a background questionnaire and the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ). Test-retest data were obtained from 64% (n = 563) of these mothers. The mean age of the mothers was 35.6 years; their mean BMI was 24.1, 31.5% were overweight or obese. The children were on average 4.5 years old; 48% were girls, 12.8% were overweight or obese.
While the fit for the original 9-item 2-factor model was poor, shorter 8- and 6-item versions were supported by confirmatory factor analysis (CFI > 0.95, RMSEA
PubMed ID
25462025 View in PubMed
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Association between mothers' and fathers' depressive symptoms, sense of coherence and perception of their child's temperament in early parenthood in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116914
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):233-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
Clara Aarts
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Västmanland County Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. birgitta.kerstis@ltv.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 May;41(3):233-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - epidemiology
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sense of Coherence
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperament
Abstract
To examine whether there was any association between mothers' and fathers' post-partum depressive symptoms and sense of coherence and perception of their child's temperament. The hypotheses were that parents with depressive symptoms: 1) have more often a poor sense of coherence, and 2) perceive their child's temperament to be more difficult than parents without depressive symptoms.
A total of 401 Swedish-speaking couples, who were the parents of children born through the years 2004-2006 in the northern part of the county of Västmanland, Sweden, were invited to participate in the study. The parents answered 3 questionnaires including: at inclusion of the study: demographic data (n = 393 couples); at 3 months: the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Sense of Coherence Scale (n = 308 couples); and at 18 months: the Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (n = 272 couples).
Depressive symptoms measured at 3 months, were reported by 17.7% of mothers and 8.7% of fathers, and correlated significantly between mothers and fathers within couples (rho = 0.165, p = 0.003). Mothers and fathers with depressive symptoms had a poorer sense of coherence (p
PubMed ID
23349164 View in PubMed
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Association between parental depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with the infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279029
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Birgitta Kerstis
Clara Aarts
Carin Tillman
Hanna Persson
Gabriella Engström
Birgitta Edlund
John Öhrvik
Sara Sylvén
Alkistis Skalkidou
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):87-94
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child of Impaired Parents
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Object Attachment
Prenatal Care
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Impaired bonding with the infant is associated with maternal postpartum depression but has not been investigated extensively in fathers. The primary study aim was to evaluate associations between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and impaired bonding with their infant. A secondary aim was to determine the associations between parents' marital problems and impaired bonding with the infant. The study is part of a population-based cohort project (UPPSAT) in Uppsala, Sweden. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum and the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire at 6 months postpartum were completed by 727 couples. The prevalence of impaired bonding was highest among couples in which both spouses had depressive symptoms. Impaired bonding was associated with higher EPDS scores in both mothers and fathers, as well as with experiencing a deteriorated marital relationship. The association between maternal and paternal impaired bonding and the mothers' and fathers' EPDS scores remained significant even after adjustment for relevant confounding factors. Depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum are associated with impaired bonding with the infant at 6 months postpartum for both mothers and fathers. It is critical to screen for and prevent depressive symptoms in both parents during early parenthood.
PubMed ID
25854998 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards human papillomavirus vaccination among Arab ethnic minority in Denmark: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265152
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):408-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Lina Zeraiq
Dorthe Nielsen
Morten Sodemann
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):408-14
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arabs - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nuclear Family - ethnology - psychology
Papillomavirus Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Knowledge regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccine uptake among ethnic minorities is poorly explored in Denmark. The objective of this study was to explore attitudes and knowledge towards HPV vaccination among Arab mothers and their daughters.
Five Arabic-speaking focus groups with mothers of vaccine-eligible girls and three focus groups with daughters were conducted. The participants were recruited through different social clubs. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate attitudes and knowledge of HPV vaccination. Meaning condensation inspired by Amedeo Giorgi was used to analyse the transcribed material.
A total of 23 women and 13 daughters were included in this study. The mothers' knowledge regarding HPV was limited to the fact that HPV can cause cervical cancer. Two focus groups mentioned that HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and none of the mothers knew that HPV also causes genital warts. Both mothers and daughters acknowledged that the daughters have deeper insight into health-related issues. A gap of knowledge between generations was identified, as mothers and daughters obtained health information from different sources: mothers used the Arabic TV channels as a source of knowledge and daughters had a range of sources, e.g. school, internet, and Western TV channels. The consequence of these differences in obtaining knowledge is that mothers and daughters lack a common language to discuss health issues. Mothers were influenced by Arabic society, while daughters had created a hybrid of Arabic and Danish. Each generation had its own reasons for accepting the vaccine. The level of HPV knowledge and awareness did not affect their uptake decision in that all the participating mothers had accepted the vaccine for their daughters.
Educational programs should target both mothers and daughters because mothers have an inadequate knowledge about HPV. This is likely to bridge the gap of knowledge between mothers and daughters, which constitutes a barrier between the generations.
PubMed ID
25754868 View in PubMed
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Birth preferences that deviate from the norm in Sweden: planned home birth versus planned cesarean section.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139255
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Ingegerd Hildingsson
Ingela Rådestad
Helena Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Source
Birth. 2010 Dec;37(4):288-95
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Choice Behavior
Confidence Intervals
Female
Home Childbirth - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Evaluation Research
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - psychology
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
Opting for a home birth or requesting a cesarean section in a culture where vaginal birth in a hospital is the norm challenges the health care system. The aim of this study was to compare background characteristics of women who chose these very different birth methods and to see how these choices affected factors of care and the birth experience.
This descriptive study employed a secondary data analysis of a sample of women who gave birth from 1997 to 2008, including 671 women who had a planned home birth and 126 women who had a planned cesarean section based on maternal request. Data were collected by means of questionnaires. Logistic regression with crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) with a 95 percent confidence interval (95% CI) was calculated.
Women with a planned home birth had a higher level of education (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.5-3.6), were less likely to have a high body mass index (OR: 0.1; 95% CI: 0.01-0.6), and were less likely to be smokers (OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1-0.4) when compared with women who had planned cesarean sections. When adjusted for background variables, women with a planned home birth felt less threat to the baby's life during birth (OR: 0.1; 95% CI: 0.03-0.4), and were more satisfied with their participation in decision making (OR: 6.0; 95% CI: 3.3-10.7) and the support from their midwife (OR 3.9; 95% CI: 2.2-7.0). They also felt more in control (OR: 3.3; 95% CI: 1.6-6.6), had a more positive birth experience (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.7-5.0), and were more satisfied with intrapartum care (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.3-4.1) compared with women who had a planned cesarean section on maternal request.
Women who planned a home birth and women who had a cesarean section based on maternal request are significantly different groups of mothers in terms of sociodemographic background. In a birth context that promotes neither home birth nor cesarean section without medical reasons, we found that those women who had a planned home birth felt more involvement in decision making and had a more positive birth experience than those who had a requested, planned cesarean section.
PubMed ID
21083720 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding and introduction of complementary food in Danish infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265032
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Hanne Kronborg
Else Foverskov
Michael Væth
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):138-45
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Food
Infant Formula - administration & dosage
Infant, Newborn
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to describe early feeding patterns in Danish infants.
A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 7113 mothers of newborns in the western part of Denmark approximately 6 months postpartum. A total of 5127 mothers (72%) returned the questionnaire and 4526 (88%) of the responding mothers provided valid answers to questions on infant nutrition.
Breastfeeding was initiated after birth by 97%. At the ages of 2, 4 and 6 months, 68%, 55% and 7% of the infants, respectively, were fully breastfed, i.e. they received mother's milk only. Full breastfeeding at 4 months was for infants significantly associated with higher birth weight, longer gestational age and singleton birth; for mothers it was associated with older ages, higher educational level, lower BMI and multiparity. During the first weeks, 14% of the infants were introduced to formula and this proportion increased to 32%, 43% and 74% at 2, 4 and 6 months, respectively. Only 20% of the infants never received formula during the first 6 months of life. Time for introduction of solid food was associated with breastfeeding status. At 4 months, 3% of the previously fully breastfed infants were introduced to solid food, 12% of the partially breastfed and 17% of the non-breastfed. At 6 months, 87% of the infants had been introduced to solid food.
The majority of Danish mothers introduced infants to solid food between 4 and six months, and did not exclusively breastfeed until 6 months, as recommended by WHO.
PubMed ID
25630521 View in PubMed
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118 records – page 1 of 12.