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Breastfeeding difficulties and exclusivity among late preterm and term infants: results from the all our babies study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107169
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;104(4):e351-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tharsiya Nagulesapillai
Sheila W McDonald
Tanis R Fenton
Hannah Faye G Mercader
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pediatrics and Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary Calgary, AB Canada. Suzanne.Tough@albertahealthservices.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;104(4):e351-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Mammary Glands, Human - physiopathology
Milk, Human - secretion
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Term Birth
Abstract
To compare breastfeeding difficulties attributable to the baby and mother/milk and exclusive breastfeeding between a group of late preterm (LP) infants and term infants.
We utilized data from a prospective community-based cohort (n=2977) in Calgary, Alberta, and performed bivariate and multivariable analyses to identify demographic, obstetric, maternal and infant health indicators that were independently associated with term status and breastfeeding outcomes.
Multivariable analyses found that LP status was an independent risk factor for breastfeeding difficulties attributable to the baby (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.24-2.38), but not for difficulties due to mother/milk (defined as not producing enough milk or having flat or inverted nipples). Among women who were breastfeeding at hospital discharge, mothers of LP infants were less likely to report exclusive breastfeeding at 4 months (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.97), after controlling for household income level, mode of delivery and postpartum maternal physical health.
Mothers of LP infants need increased support to establish successful breastfeeding outcomes and to ensure that these infants receive the full benefits of breast milk.
PubMed ID
24044478 View in PubMed
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Child guardianship in a Canadian home visitation program for women who use substances in the perinatal period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152868
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(1):e126-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rosanne M T Mills
Jodi E Siever
Matt Hicks
Dorothy Badry
Suzanne C Tough
Karen Benzies
Author Affiliation
Decision Support Research Team, Calgary Health Region, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009;16(1):e126-39
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child Custody
Child Rearing
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Home Care Services
House Calls
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Behavior - psychology
Maternal health services
Maternal Welfare - psychology
Maternal-Child Health Centers
Mothers - psychology
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Program Evaluation
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
Retaining guardianship of one's infant is often a priority for pregnant women who use substances, and may be beneficial to infants when they are safe in their mothers' care. Previous studies from the United States have identified several maternal psychosocial characteristics associated with the ability to keep an infant free from abuse or neglect; however, little is known about the impact of multiple risk factors on guardianship, particularly in Canadian intervention programs.
To describe maternal characteristics associated with child guardianship among pregnant women at risk of an alcohol and/or substance exposed pregnancy who attended a Canadian home visitation program.
Guardianship status at 6 months post-enrolment was extracted from a provincial program's records for all women enrolled between November 1999 and May 2005 (n=64). Bivariate analyses were performed to determine client characteristics most likely to have retained guardianship.
At follow-up, 70% of participants were guardians of the index infant. Higher income, more prenatal care, no history of sexual abuse, better alcohol and psychiatric scores, and fewer risk factors on a cumulative risk index were significantly associated with retaining guardianship at 6 month follow-up (p
PubMed ID
19182306 View in PubMed
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A comparison between late preterm and term infants on breastfeeding and maternal mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119964
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Oct;17(8):1468-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Sheila W McDonald
Karen M Benzies
Jenna E Gallant
Deborah A McNeil
Siobhan M Dolan
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, sheilaw.mcdonald@albertahealthservices.ca.
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Oct;17(8):1468-77
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Community-Based Participatory Research
Depression - epidemiology
Depression, Postpartum - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Maternal Welfare - psychology
Mental health
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Postpartum Period
Premature Birth
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Term Birth
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare breastfeeding, postpartum mental health, and health service utilization between a group of late preterm (LP) maternal infant pairs and term counterparts. Data was drawn from a prospective community-based cohort in Calgary, Alberta. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed. LP infants were more likely to have had a longer median length of stay after birth (P 
Notes
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PubMed ID
23054457 View in PubMed
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Validation of Canadian mothers' recall of events in labour and delivery with electronic health records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115872
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Uilst Bat-Erdene
Amy Metcalfe
Sheila W McDonald
Suzanne C Tough
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S3
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric
Electronic Health Records
Female
Humans
Infant
Labor, Obstetric
Mental Recall
Mothers - psychology
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Self Report
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Maternal report of events that occur during labour and delivery are used extensively in epidemiological research; however, the validity of these data are rarely confirmed. This study aimed to validate maternal self-report of events that occurred in labour and delivery with data found in electronic health records in a Canadian setting.
Data from the All Our Babies study, a prospective community-based cohort of women's experiences during pregnancy, were linked to electronic health records to assess the validity of maternal recall at four months post-partum of events that occurred during labour and delivery. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa scores were calculated. Results were stratified by maternal age, gravidity and educational attainment.
Maternal recall at four months post-partum was excellent for infant characteristics (gender, birth weight, gestational age, multiple births) and variables related to labour and delivery (mode of delivery, epidural, labour induction) (sensitivity and specificity >85%). Women who had completed a university degree had significantly better recall of labour induction and use of an epidural.
Maternal recall of infant characteristics and events that occurred during labour and delivery is excellent at four months post-partum and is a valid source of information for research purposes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23445768 View in PubMed
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