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[A contact person leads to increased satisfaction among new mothers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139338
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Nov 15;172(46):3178-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2010
Author
Jette Ammentorp
Hanne Irene Jensen
Betty Nørgaard
Poul-Erik Kofoed
Author Affiliation
Syddansk Universitet, Sygehus Lillebaelt/IRS, Forskningsinitiativet for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, Denmark. jette.ammentorp@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Nov 15;172(46):3178-82
Date
Nov-15-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - manpower - standards
Mothers - psychology
Neonatal Nursing - manpower - standards
Nurse Practitioners - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test a new method for continuous monitoring of the Danish contact person concept and to evaluate the impact of the concept on the mothers' perception of nursing care and on their self-efficacy.
This is a descriptive study, carried out at a neonatal unit forming part of a department of paediatrics. Using an electronic questionnaire, the mothers were asked if they had been given a contact nurse and how they assessed the quality of the care and their own self-efficacy. The correlation between their experience of being given a contact person and having high scores of nursing care and of self-efficacy was analyzed by logistic regression.
A total of 300 (81%) of the mothers answered the questionnaire. Among the mothers who acknowledged having had a contact nurse compared with those who did not, odds ratios were > 1 in 10/11 questions concerning assessment of nursing care. Concerning the mothers' assessment of their self-efficacy, the odds ratios were > 1 in 7/11 questions. None of these were statistically significant.
The study showed a tendency towards a positive impact on nursing care when contact persons were allocated to the mothers who were admitted to a neonatal ward. The findings were statistically significant in 2/11 questions.
PubMed ID
21073832 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute maternal social dysfunction, health perception and psychological distress after ultrasonographic detection of a fetal structural anomaly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143038
Source
BJOG. 2010 Aug;117(9):1127-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
A. Kaasen
A. Helbig
U F Malt
T. Naes
H. Skari
G. Haugen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. a.kaasen@online.no
Source
BJOG. 2010 Aug;117(9):1127-38
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Arousal
Attitude to Health
Counseling
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Fetus - abnormalities
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Self Concept
Social Isolation
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Ultrasonography, Prenatal - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
To predict acute psychological distress in pregnant women following detection of a fetal structural anomaly by ultrasonography, and to relate these findings to a comparison group.
A prospective, observational study.
Tertiary referral centre for fetal medicine.
One hundred and eighty pregnant women with a fetal structural anomaly detected by ultrasound (study group) and 111 with normal ultrasound findings (comparison group) were included within a week following sonographic examination after gestational age 12 weeks (inclusion period: May 2006 to February 2009).
Social dysfunction and health perception were assessed by the corresponding subscales of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Psychological distress was assessed using the Impact of Events Scale (IES-22), Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the anxiety and depression subscales of the GHQ-28. Fetal anomalies were classified according to severity and diagnostic or prognostic ambiguity at the time of assessment.
Social dysfunction, health perception and psychological distress (intrusion, avoidance, arousal, anxiety, depression).
The least severe anomalies with no diagnostic or prognostic ambiguity induced the lowest levels of IES intrusive distress (P = 0.025). Women included after 22 weeks of gestation (24%) reported significantly higher GHQ distress than women included earlier in pregnancy (P = 0.003). The study group had significantly higher levels of psychosocial distress than the comparison group on all psychometric endpoints.
Psychological distress was predicted by gestational age at the time of assessment, severity of the fetal anomaly, and ambiguity concerning diagnosis or prognosis.
PubMed ID
20528866 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation to the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly: a prospective longitudinal study of maternal well-being and psychological distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259696
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ragnhild B Nes
Espen Røysamb
Lars J Hauge
Tom Kornstad
Markus A Landolt
Lorentz M Irgens
Leif Eskedal
Petter Kristensen
Margarete E Vollrath
Source
Dev Psychol. 2014 Jun;50(6):1827-39
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Checklist
Child, Preschool
Cleft Lip - psychology
Cohort Studies
Down Syndrome - psychology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Models, Statistical
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Abstract
This study explores the stability and change in maternal life satisfaction and psychological distress following the birth of a child with a congenital anomaly using 5 assessments from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study collected from Pregnancy Week 17 to 36 months postpartum. Participating mothers were divided into those having infants with (a) Down syndrome (DS; n = 114), (b) cleft lip/palate (CLP; n = 179), and (c) no disability (ND; n = 99,122). Responses on the Satisfaction With Life Scale and a short version of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist were analyzed using structural equation modeling, including latent growth curves. Satisfaction and distress levels were highly diverse in the sample, but fairly stable over time (retest correlations: .47-.68). However, the birth of a child with DS was associated with a rapid decrease in maternal life satisfaction and a corresponding increase in psychological distress observed between pregnancy and 6 months postpartum. The unique effects from DS on changes in satisfaction (Cohen's d = -.66) and distress (Cohen's d = .60) remained stable. Higher distress and lower life satisfaction at later assessments appeared to reflect a persistent burden that was already experienced 6 months after birth. CLP had a temporary impact (Cohen's d = .29) on maternal distress at 6 months. However, the overall trajectories did not differ between CLP and ND mothers. In sum, the birth of a child with DS influences maternal psychological distress and life satisfaction throughout the toddler period, whereas a curable condition like CLP has only a minor temporary effect on maternal psychological distress.
PubMed ID
24588521 View in PubMed
Less detail

ADHD, comorbid disorders and psychosocial functioning: How representative is a child cohort study? Findings from a national patient registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284629
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Jan 17;17(1):23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-2017
Author
Beate Oerbeck
Kristin Romvig Overgaard
Stian Thoresen Aspenes
Are Hugo Pripp
Marianne Mordre
Heidi Aase
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Pal Zeiner
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Jan 17;17(1):23
Date
Jan-17-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mothers - psychology
Neurodevelopmental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Abstract
Cohort studies often report findings on children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) but may be biased by self-selection. The representativeness of cohort studies needs to be investigated to determine whether their findings can be generalised to the general child population. The aim of the present study was to examine the representativeness of child ADHD in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).
The study population was children born between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2008 registered with hyperkinetic disorders (hereafter ADHD) in the Norwegian Patient Registry during the years 2008-2013, and two groups of children with ADHD were identified in: 1. MoBa and 2. The general child population. We used the multiaxial International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and compared the proportions of comorbid disorders (axes I-III), abnormal psychosocial situations (axis V) and child global functioning (axis VI) between these two groups. We also compared the relative differences in the multiaxial classifications for boys and girls and for children with/without axis I comorbidity, respectively in these two groups of children with ADHD.
A total of 11 119 children were registered with ADHD, with significantly fewer in MoBa (1.45%) than the general child population (2.11%), p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28095819 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse trajectories of mental health problems predict subsequent burnout and work-family conflict - a longitudinal study of employed women with children followed over 18 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282979
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-08-2016
Author
Wendy Nilsen
Anni Skipstein
Evangelia Demerouti
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Date
Nov-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Conflict (Psychology)
Employment - psychology
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
The long-term consequence of experiencing mental health problems may lead to several adverse outcomes. The current study aims to validate previous identified trajectories of mental health problems from 1993 to 2006 in women by examining their implications on subsequent work and family-related outcomes in 2011.
Employed women (n?=?439) with children were drawn from the Tracking Opportunities and Problems-Study (TOPP), a community-based longitudinal study following Norwegian families across 18 years. Previous identified latent profiles of mental health trajectories (i.e., High; Moderate; Low-rising and Low levels of mental health problems over time) measured at six time points between 1993 and 2006 were examined as predictors of burnout (e.g., exhaustion and disengagement from work) and work-family conflict in 2011 in univariate and multivariate analyses of variance adjusted for potential confounders (age, job demands, and negative emotionality).
We found that having consistently High and Moderate symptoms as well as Low-Rising symptoms from 1993 to 2006 predicted higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement from work and work-family conflict in 2011. Findings remained unchanged when adjusting for several potential confounders, but when adjusting for current mental health problems only levels of exhaustion were predicted by the mental health trajectories.
The study expands upon previous studies on the field by using a longer time span and by focusing on employed women with children who experience different patterns of mental health trajectories. The long-term effect of these trajectories highlight and validate the importance of early identification and prevention in women experiencing adverse patterns of mental health problems with regards to subsequent work and family-related outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27825325 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agreement between mothers', fathers', and teachers' ratings of behavioural and emotional problems in 3-5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299314
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206752
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Elisabet Fält
Thomas Wallby
Anna Sarkadi
Raziye Salari
Helena Fabian
Author Affiliation
Child Health and Parenting (CHAP), Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206752
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Observer Variation
Problem behavior
School Teachers - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a valid and reliable instrument for measuring children's mental health, is available in parent- and teacher versions, making it an ideal tool for assessing behavioural and emotional problems in young children. However, few studies have evaluated inter-parent agreement on the SDQ, and in most studies on SDQ agreement, parent scores are either provided by only one parent or have been combined into one parent score. Furthermore, studies on SDQ inter-rater agreement usually only reflect degree of correlation, leaving the agreement between measurements unknown. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine both degree of correlation and agreement between parent and teacher SDQ reports, in a community sample of preschool-aged children in Sweden.
Data were obtained from the Children and Parents in Focus trial. The sample comprised 4,469 children 3-5-years-old. Mothers, fathers and preschool teachers completed the SDQ as part of the routine health check-ups at Child Health Centres. Inter-rater agreement was measured using Pearson correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation (ICC).
Results revealed poor/fair agreement between parent and teacher ratings (ICC 0.25-0.54) and good/excellent agreement between mother and father ratings (ICC 0.66-0.76). The highest level of agreement between parents and teachers was found for the hyperactivity and peer problem subscales, whereas the strongest agreement between parents was found for the hyperactivity and conduct subscales.
Low inter-rater agreement between parent and teacher ratings suggests that information from both teachers and parents is important when using the SDQ as a method to identify mental health problems in preschool children. Although mothers and fathers each provide unique information about their child's behaviour, good inter-parent agreement indicates that a single parent informant may be sufficient and simplify data collection.
PubMed ID
30383861 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aiming to be a breastfeeding mother in a neonatal intensive care unit and at home: a thematic analysis of peer-support group discussion in social media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275111
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2015 Oct;11(4):712-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Hannakaisa Niela-Vilén
Anna Axelin
Hanna-Leena Melender
Sanna Salanterä
Source
Matern Child Nutr. 2015 Oct;11(4):712-26
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Middle Aged
Milk, Human
Mothers - psychology
Peer Group
Social Media
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
Preterm infants are usually breastfed less than full-term infants, and successful breastfeeding requires a supportive environment and special efforts from their mothers. A breastfeeding peer-support group, utilising social media, was developed for these mothers in order to support them in this challenge. Mothers were able to discuss breastfeeding and share experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants based on the postings in peer-support group discussions in social media. The actively participating mothers (n?=?22) had given birth
PubMed ID
24521232 View in PubMed
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Ante- and perinatal circumstances and risk of attempted suicides and suicides in offspring: the Northern Finland birth cohort 1966 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127072
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Antti Alaräisänen
Jouko Miettunen
Anneli Pouta
Matti Isohanni
Pirkko Räsänen
Pirjo Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. antti.alaraisanen@oulu.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;47(11):1783-94
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Single Parent - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Physiological
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate those ante- and perinatal circumstances preceding suicide attempts and suicides, which have so far not been studied intensively.
Examination of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 10,742), originally based on antenatal questionnaire data and now followed up from mid-pregnancy to age 39, to ascertain psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring and suicides or attempted suicides in the offspring using nationwide registers.
A total of 121 suicide attempts (57 males) and 69 suicides (56 males) had occurred. Previously unstudied antenatal factors (maternal depressed mood and smoking, unwanted pregnancy) were not related to these after adjustment. Psychiatric disorders in the parents and offspring were the risk factors in both genders. When adjusted for these, the statistically significant risk factors among males were a single-parent family for suicide attempts (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.62-8.50) and grand multiparity for suicides (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.15-6.18). When a psychiatric disorder in females was included among possible risk factors for suicide attempts, it alone remained significant (OR 15.55, 8.78-27.53).
A single-parent family was a risk factor for attempted suicides and grand multiparity for suicides in male offspring even after adjusting for other ante- and perinatal circumstances and mental disorders in the parents and offspring. Mothers' antenatal depressed mood and smoking and unwanted pregnancy did not increase the risk of suicide, which is a novel finding.
PubMed ID
22327374 View in PubMed
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Anxiety in women - a Swedish national three-generational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299497
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 06 04; 18(1):168
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-04-2018
Author
Gunilla Sydsjö
Sara Agnafors
Marie Bladh
Ann Josefsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE-581 85, Linköping, Sweden. Gunilla.Sydsjo@liu.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 06 04; 18(1):168
Date
06-04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Effect
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers - psychology
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Findings from animal and human studies indicate that anxiety and stress have a negative influence on the child and mother. The aim of this study was to explore the risk for having an anxiety diagnosis and the impact of the diagnosis in a three generational perspective.
The information was retrieved from Swedish population-based registries. All women who gave birth between 1973 and 1977 (n 169,782), their daughters (n 244,152), and subsequently also the offspring of the daughters (n 381,953) were followed until 2013.
We found that 4% of the mothers and 6% of the grandmothers had been diagnosed with anxiety. Women who had mothers with an anxiety disorder were more than twice as likely to have an anxiety disorder themselves compared to all other women (OR?=?2.20, 95% CI?=?2.04-2.30). In the third generation, the children born to mothers with an anxiety disorder, the odds ratio of being diagnosed with anxiety was more than twice as high than for the rest of the population (OR?=?2.54, 95% CI?=?2.01-3.20). If both the mother and the grandmother had had an anxiety disorder the odds ratio for the child having a diagnosis of anxiety was three times higher (OR?=?3.11, 95% CI?=?2.04-4.75). Anxiety diagnosis in the two previous generations also increased the likelihood of the child having either more than two inpatient visits or more than 10 outpatient visits (OR?=?2.64, 95% CI?=?2.40-2.91 and OR?=?2.21, 95% CI?=?2.01-2.43, respectively).
The intergenerational effect on anxiety is high. In order to minimize the risk for further transmission of anxiety disorders, increased awareness and generous use of effective treatment regimes might be of importance.
PubMed ID
29866128 View in PubMed
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[A reflection on services to families in which the mother suffers from a mental disorder].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132945
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2010;35(2):185-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Monique Carrière
Michèle Clément
Sylvie Tétreault
Geneviève Pépin
Mireille Fortier
Steve Paquet
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Groupe de Recherche sur l'Inclusion sociale, l'Organisation des Services et l'Évaluation en Santé Mentale (GRIOSE-SM).
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2010;35(2):185-208
Date
2010
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Relations
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Mental health services
Mothers - psychology
Quebec
Abstract
This article presents results of a research conducted in Québec City between 2004 and 2006. The objective of this study was to examine services to families in which the mother suffers from a mental disorder. The authors examine the experiences and perspectives of parents with a mental disorder, spouses and children on the services offered to families ; the study also examines the organisation, the basis and the context of actions and interactions between stakeholders of various sectors of services to families with a parent with severe mental illness. The authors conclude that despite Quebec's good intentions, members of families in which the mother suffers from a mental disorder do not benefit from a truly comprehensive family-focused approach.
PubMed ID
21761092 View in PubMed
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