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Alaskan Hematophagous insects, their feeding habits and potential as vectors of pathogenic organisms. II: The feeding habits and colonization of subarctic mosquitoes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298784
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-12 Vol II.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1965
REF ALASKA RC . 955 . • U9 no.64-12 ~: VO l , 2 ·1965 j copy 1 AL-TR-64-12 Vol II ALASKAN HEMATOPHAGOUS INSECTS 1 THEIR FEEDING HABITS AND POTENTIAL AS VECTORS OF PATHOGENIC ORGANISMS II: THE FEEDING HABITS AND COLONIZATION OF SUBARCTIC MOSQUITOES Cluff E. Hopla July 1965
  1 document  
Author
Hopla, Cluff E.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-12 Vol II.
Date
July 1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
9571565
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Insects
Mosquitoes
Diphtheria
Host preference
Zoonoses
Haematophagus arthropods
Abstract
Feeding habits of mosquitoes of the taiga and tundra were studied. Greater emphasis was given to those of the taiga, however, because of the longer mosquito season and the greater variety of genera and species present. Using an exposed area of human forearm (54 square inches) and a similar area of shaved rabbit abdomen, biting records were compiled. Mosquitoes were collected by aspirator after the proboscis was fully inserted. Twice as many mosquitoes were collected from the human as from the rabbit, with Aedes excrucians, A. punctor, A. intrudens and A. pionips predominating in the order given. A tower was built, with platforms at 6-foot intervals up to 42 feet, to study vertical distribution and host preference. Domestic chickens, white laboratory rabbits and varying hares, along with empty control boxes, were placed at the various heights. Approximately 80% of the 10,722 specimens obtained were collected in the first 18 feet. The percentages of mosquitoes that were engorged when collected from the bait boxes were as follows: chickens, 18.2%; white rabbits, 70%; and varying hares, 92%. Through field observations and laboratory studies, small rodents (microtines) and passerine birds are not thought significant sources of blood meals, but hares, ground squirrels and larger mammals are. Using insect nets, 46,123 specimens were collected in the vicinity of the tower, both from vegetation and aerially up to height of 6 feet. Only six showed evidence of a recent blood meal. Evidence indicates that most subarctic mosquitoes take but one blood meal, a fact of considerable importance when considering them as vectors of zoonoses. Studies of the natural history of Culiseta alaskaensis indicated that the unfed adult females overwinter close to the ground in dense growths of grass underneath the snow cover where the temperature range is from 16-20° F. In the laboratory, C. alaskaensis lived only about one week at 0° F. Chromatographic studies did not reveal the presence of glycerol compounds in the hemolymph.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-12 vol.2
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Analysis of western encephalomyelitis surveillance and control programs in Manitoba, 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251088
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 May-Jun;67 Suppl 1:72-3
Publication Type
Article

An outbreak of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Trinidad, W.I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222689
Source
Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 1992 Dec;86(6):583-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
D D Chadee
A. Le Maitre
C C Tilluckdharry
Author Affiliation
Insect Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health, St Joseph, Trinidad, W.I.
Source
Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 1992 Dec;86(6):583-90
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Animals
Anopheles
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Insect Vectors
Malaria, Vivax - epidemiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Mosquito Control - methods
Sex Factors
Trinidad and Tobago - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of Plasmodium vivax malaria occurred in Trinidad some 25 years after a successful eradication programme. The 'index case' was infected while visiting Perdaneles, Venezuela, and was responsible for the renewal of malaria transmission by indigenous Anopheles aquasalis mosquitoes in Icacos, Trinidad, W.I. Nine cases (four females and five males) of P. vivax malaria were locally transmitted in Icacos. Most of the cases (70%) were in the 15-24 or 25-44 year age groups. In Granville/Chatham, another, unrelated case of locally transmitted P. vivax malaria was discovered through active surveillance. The intervention measures adopted, which successfully eradicated P. vivax malaria from Trinidad, are described. The need to maintain malaria surveillance is emphasized.
PubMed ID
1304699 View in PubMed
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[Arborviruses of the California encephalitis serogroup 1N Russia and their contribution to infectious pathology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132730
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
L V Kolobukhina
S D L'vov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):41-5
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, viral
Central Nervous System - pathology - virology
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Disease Reservoirs - virology
Disease Vectors
Ecosystem
Encephalitis Virus, California - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Encephalitis, California - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Kidney - pathology - virology
Liver - pathology - virology
Lung - pathology - virology
Mosquito control
Neutralization Tests
Periodicity
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Viral Tropism
Virulence
Abstract
This review focuses on arborviral infections associated with California serocomplex (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus). Results of relevant eco-epidemiological and clinical studies in Russia are presented suggesting the ubiquitious nature of diseases caused by viruses of the California encephalitis serocomplex (Inko, Tahyna, Snowshoe Hare). The etiologic structure of these diseases in taiga and mixed woods of the European part and Western Siberia is dominated by the Inco virus and in southern regions by Tahina. The diseases have a well apparent seasonal pattern (July-August) in agreement with the peak summer activity of the pathogens. Two clinical forms of pathology are distinguished, influenza-like and generalized, the latter affecting lungs, kidneys, liver, and CNS. The Inco virus plays a key role in pathogenesis of the generalized form affecting CNS.
PubMed ID
21786596 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the emergency mosquito control operation in Manitoba, 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251089
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 May-Jun;67 Suppl 1:69-71
Publication Type
Article

Beginnings and success in preventing anophelism by means of gambusia fish on the island of Krk in Croatia from 1922 to 1927.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137674
Source
Med Glas (Zenica). 2010 Aug;7(2):106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Ante Skrobonja
Neven Materljan
Ivana Skrobonja
Author Affiliation
Departement for the History of Medicine, Rijeka University School of Medicine, Brace Branchettan 20, Rijeka, Crotia. anteskrobonja@yahoo.com
Source
Med Glas (Zenica). 2010 Aug;7(2):106-10
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Croatia
Cyprinodontiformes
History, 20th Century
Humans
Malaria - history - prevention & control
Mosquito Control - history
Pest Control, Biological - history
Abstract
The introductory part has summarized the role of malaria in the course of history and various attempts of its eradication in Croatia before the World War I. Furthemore, there is a list of activities and results accomplished between 1922 and 1927 on the island of Krk by Dr. Otmar Trausmiller. After a systematic sanitation of all anopheles habitats, primarily natural and artificial bodies of still water, and introduction of imported gambusia to those bodies of water, anopheles was virtually eradicated on the island. What followed was an evident decrease of new malaria incidents, and in the campaign against malaria there was still major concern in the form of chronic patients and intensive quinine therapy. Today, about eighty years after it was introduced to Krk, gambusia still abides in ponds across the island and it represents one of the main factors in the protection against potential revival of indigenous malaria.
PubMed ID
21258304 View in PubMed
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Biology of an Alaskan mosquito, Culiseta alaskanesis (Ludl.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301506
Source
Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 47(1):9-24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1954
Author
Frohne, William C.
Source
Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 47(1):9-24.
Date
1954
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Mosquito
Less detail

Blood meals and egg production of Culiseta alaskaensis (Ludlow) in captivity (Diptera: Culcidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301862
Source
Mosquito News. 29(1):65659.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Author
Sommerman, Kathryn M.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Mosquito News. 29(1):65659.
Date
1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Mosquitoes
Less detail

Blood meals and egg production of four species of Alaskan Aedes in captivity (Diptera: Culcidae)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301863
Source
Mosquito News. 29(4):654-662.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Author
Sommerman, Kathryn M.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Mosquito News. 29(4):654-662.
Date
1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Mosquitoes
Less detail

Breeding places of Aedes pseudodiantaeus Smith and diantaeus H., D., and K., in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301521
Source
Brooklyn Entomological Society Bulletin. 49(4):95-99.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1954
Author
Frohne, William C.
Frohne, R.G.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Brooklyn Entomological Society Bulletin. 49(4):95-99.
Date
1954
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Mosquito
Less detail

91 records – page 1 of 10.