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53 records – page 1 of 6.

Analysis of western encephalomyelitis surveillance and control programs in Manitoba, 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251088
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 May-Jun;67 Suppl 1:72-3
Publication Type
Article

An outbreak of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Trinidad, W.I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222689
Source
Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 1992 Dec;86(6):583-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
D D Chadee
A. Le Maitre
C C Tilluckdharry
Author Affiliation
Insect Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health, St Joseph, Trinidad, W.I.
Source
Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 1992 Dec;86(6):583-90
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Animals
Anopheles
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Insect Vectors
Malaria, Vivax - epidemiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Mosquito Control - methods
Sex Factors
Trinidad and Tobago - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of Plasmodium vivax malaria occurred in Trinidad some 25 years after a successful eradication programme. The 'index case' was infected while visiting Perdaneles, Venezuela, and was responsible for the renewal of malaria transmission by indigenous Anopheles aquasalis mosquitoes in Icacos, Trinidad, W.I. Nine cases (four females and five males) of P. vivax malaria were locally transmitted in Icacos. Most of the cases (70%) were in the 15-24 or 25-44 year age groups. In Granville/Chatham, another, unrelated case of locally transmitted P. vivax malaria was discovered through active surveillance. The intervention measures adopted, which successfully eradicated P. vivax malaria from Trinidad, are described. The need to maintain malaria surveillance is emphasized.
PubMed ID
1304699 View in PubMed
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[Arborviruses of the California encephalitis serogroup 1N Russia and their contribution to infectious pathology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132730
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
L V Kolobukhina
S D L'vov
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2011;(5):41-5
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, viral
Central Nervous System - pathology - virology
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Disease Reservoirs - virology
Disease Vectors
Ecosystem
Encephalitis Virus, California - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Encephalitis, California - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology - virology
Humans
Kidney - pathology - virology
Liver - pathology - virology
Lung - pathology - virology
Mosquito control
Neutralization Tests
Periodicity
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Viral Tropism
Virulence
Abstract
This review focuses on arborviral infections associated with California serocomplex (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus). Results of relevant eco-epidemiological and clinical studies in Russia are presented suggesting the ubiquitious nature of diseases caused by viruses of the California encephalitis serocomplex (Inko, Tahyna, Snowshoe Hare). The etiologic structure of these diseases in taiga and mixed woods of the European part and Western Siberia is dominated by the Inco virus and in southern regions by Tahina. The diseases have a well apparent seasonal pattern (July-August) in agreement with the peak summer activity of the pathogens. Two clinical forms of pathology are distinguished, influenza-like and generalized, the latter affecting lungs, kidneys, liver, and CNS. The Inco virus plays a key role in pathogenesis of the generalized form affecting CNS.
PubMed ID
21786596 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the emergency mosquito control operation in Manitoba, 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251089
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 May-Jun;67 Suppl 1:69-71
Publication Type
Article

Beginnings and success in preventing anophelism by means of gambusia fish on the island of Krk in Croatia from 1922 to 1927.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137674
Source
Med Glas (Zenica). 2010 Aug;7(2):106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Ante Skrobonja
Neven Materljan
Ivana Skrobonja
Author Affiliation
Departement for the History of Medicine, Rijeka University School of Medicine, Brace Branchettan 20, Rijeka, Crotia. anteskrobonja@yahoo.com
Source
Med Glas (Zenica). 2010 Aug;7(2):106-10
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Croatia
Cyprinodontiformes
History, 20th Century
Humans
Malaria - history - prevention & control
Mosquito Control - history
Pest Control, Biological - history
Abstract
The introductory part has summarized the role of malaria in the course of history and various attempts of its eradication in Croatia before the World War I. Furthemore, there is a list of activities and results accomplished between 1922 and 1927 on the island of Krk by Dr. Otmar Trausmiller. After a systematic sanitation of all anopheles habitats, primarily natural and artificial bodies of still water, and introduction of imported gambusia to those bodies of water, anopheles was virtually eradicated on the island. What followed was an evident decrease of new malaria incidents, and in the campaign against malaria there was still major concern in the form of chronic patients and intensive quinine therapy. Today, about eighty years after it was introduced to Krk, gambusia still abides in ponds across the island and it represents one of the main factors in the protection against potential revival of indigenous malaria.
PubMed ID
21258304 View in PubMed
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Cooperative actions to achieve malaria control without the use of DDT.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183667
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):387-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Keith E Chanon
Jorge F Méndez-Galván
Jose Manuel Galindo-Jaramillo
Hector Olguín-Bernal
Victor H Borja-Aburto
Author Affiliation
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460, USA. chanon.keith@epa.gov
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Aug;206(4-5):387-94
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anopheles - pathogenicity
Antimalarials - administration & dosage
Canada
Chloroquine - administration & dosage
Cost-Benefit Analysis
DDT - poisoning - supply & distribution
Drug Combinations
Humans
Hygiene
International Cooperation
Malaria - drug therapy - prevention & control
Malathion
Mexico
Mosquito Control - economics - methods
Primaquine - administration & dosage
Public Health Administration
United States
Abstract
The success of regional networks to provide incentives and mechanisms for sharing information is illustrated through the North American Regional Action Plan on DDT (NARAP). This NARAP was designed to reduce human and environmental exposure to DDT and its metabolites in North America through cooperative efforts. The increasing role of environmental concerns in the planning and design of Mexico's DDT phase-out program motivated the Mexican Ministry of Health to undertake an alternative program for malaria control maximizing community participation without negatively affecting human and ecosystem health. This program relies on: 1) elimination of parasites in people, 2) improvement of personal and household hygiene, and 3) use of environmental management practices to eliminate mosquito breeding sites. This new strategy resulted in the elimination of DDT for malaria control in Mexico in the year 2000. While malaria and its corresponding vectors show considerable variability within a single country and certainly around the globe, the case example of Mexico provides a methodology for developing alternatives to DDT.
PubMed ID
12971694 View in PubMed
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[Determination of the season of possible malaria transmission by Anopheline mosquitoes in South-Western Bulgaria].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158087
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2008 Jan-Mar;(1):31-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
O D Mikov
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2008 Jan-Mar;(1):31-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Anopheles - classification - growth & development
Bulgaria - epidemiology
Ecosystem
Female
Humans
Insect Vectors - classification - growth & development
Malaria - transmission
Mosquito control
Population Density
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
This study was undertaken to determine the duration of the possible malaria transmission season by the local anopheline species in the region of the town of Sandanski, situated in South-Western Bulgaria, where 18 indigenous cases of vivax malaria were recorded in the adjacent-villages in 1995-1996. The present study was conducted in the same villages in 2003 and 2004 during the potential malaria season (April-October) in Bulgaria. A total number of 758 female mosquitoes were captured and examined. The catch comprised Anopheles maculipennis Meigen (95.1%), An. sacharovi Favre (2.4%), and An. claviger Meigen (2.5%). Their physiological age was determined by the ovariolar method using the oil injection technique. The malaria transmission season was estimated to begin on May 10 in 2003 and on June 8 in 2004. In both 2003 and 2004, potentially hazardous females were found in the mosquito population in the mid-June and disappeared in the second decade of September. The beginning of the possible malaria transmission season in the region of the area of the town of Sandanski is considered to be associated with the actual appearance of potentially dangerous females in the local mosquito population. Thus, the duration of this season as determined by the age composition of the mosquito population was shorter than that determined on the basis of the mean diurnal temperatures. A sample seasonal curve of the minimum potentially dangerous physiological age of the female mosquitoes was derived from the climatic data. It is proposed to be used together with the age composition data for estimation of the actual limits of a malaria transmission season.
PubMed ID
18368714 View in PubMed
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Development of a controlled release formulation of an indigenous insect growth regulator, DPE-28, a substituted diphenylether, for controlling the breeding of Culex quinquefasciatus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133213
Source
Indian J Med Res. 2011 Jun;133:650-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
M. Kalyanasundaram
Nisha Mathew
A. Elango
V. Padmanabhan
Author Affiliation
Vector Control Research Centre (ICMR), Puducherry, India. ananthikannan@ymail.com
Source
Indian J Med Res. 2011 Jun;133:650-4
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breeding
Culex - drug effects - physiology
Delayed-Action Preparations - chemistry - toxicity
Female
Humans
Insect Vectors
Insecticides - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacology - toxicity
Juvenile Hormones - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacology - toxicity
Larva - drug effects
Lethal Dose 50
Male
Mosquito Control - methods
Phenyl Ethers - administration & dosage - chemistry - pharmacology - toxicity
Rabbits
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Abstract
DPE-28, a substituted diphenyl ether (2,6-ditertiarybutyl phenyl-2',4'-dinitro phenyl ether) was reported to exhibit promising insect growth regulating activity against Culex quinquefasciatus, the vector of lymphatic filariasis. A controlled release formulation (CRF) of DPE-28 has been developed to control Cx. quinquefasciatus in its breeding habitats. Toxicity of DPE-28, safety to non-target mosquito predators and the release profile of the CRF of DPE-28 are studied and discussed.
The acute oral and dermal toxicity was tested in male and female Wistar rats as per the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines 425 and 402 respectively. The toxicity of DPE-28 to non-target predators was tested as per the reported procedure from this laboratory. The CRF of DPE-28 was prepared by following the reported procedure developed at this laboratory earlier. The concentration of DPE-28 released from the CRF was monitored by HPLC by constructing a calibration graph by plotting the peak area in the Y-axis and the concentration of DPE-28 in the X-axis.
DPE-28 has been tested for acute oral toxicity and found to be moderately toxic with LD 50 value of 1098 mg/kg body weight (b.w). The results of the acute dermal toxicity and skin irritation studies reveal that DPE-28 is safe and non-irritant. DPE-28 when tested at 0.4 mg/litre against non-target mosquito predators did not produce any mortality. The release profile of the active ingredient DPE-28 from the CRF by HPLC technique showed that the average daily release (ADR) of DPE-28 ranged from 0.07 to 5.0 mg/litre during first four weeks. Thereafter the matrix started eroding and the ADR ranged from 5 to 11 mg/litre during the remaining 5 wk. The cumulative release of active ingredient showed that > 90 per cent of the active ingredient was released from the matrix.
The controlled release matrix of DPE-28 was thus found to inhibit the adult emergence (>80%) of Cx. quinquefasciatus for a period of nine weeks. The CRF of DPE-28 may play a useful role in field and may be recommended for mosquito control programme after evaluating the same under field conditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21727665 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do Multi-year Applications of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis for Control of Mosquito Larvae Affect the Abundance of B. cereus Group Populations in Riparian Wetland Soils?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291889
Source
Microb Ecol. 2017 Nov; 74(4):901-909
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Salome Schneider
Tania Tajrin
Jan O Lundström
Niels B Hendriksen
Petter Melin
Ingvar Sundh
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden. salome.schneider@wsl.ch.
Source
Microb Ecol. 2017 Nov; 74(4):901-909
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacillus cereus - physiology
Bacillus thuringiensis - physiology
Culicidae - growth & development
Larva
Mosquito control
Pest Control, Biological
Seasons
Soil Microbiology
Sweden
Wetlands
Abstract
Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is a soil-borne bacterium affiliated to the Bacillus cereus group (Bcg) and has been used in biocontrol products against nematoceran larvae for several decades. However, knowledge is limited on whether long-term Bti application can affect the structure of indigenous communities of Bcg and the overall abundance of Bti. Using species- and group-specific quantitative PCR assays, we measured the Bcg- and Bti-abundances in riparian wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains of central Sweden. On five occasions during one vegetative season, soil samples were collected in alder swamps and wet meadows which had been treated with Bti for mosquito larvae control during the preceding 11 years, as well as in untreated control sites and well-drained forests in the same area. The average abundance of Bcg in alder swamps was around three times higher than in wet meadows. Across all sites and habitats, the Bti treatments had no effect on the Bcg-abundance, whereas the Bti-abundance was significantly higher in the treated than in the control sites. However, for individual sampling sites, abundances of Bti and Bcg were not correlated with the number of Bti applications, indicating that added Bti possibly influenced the total population of Bti in the short term but had only a limited effect in the longer term. The findings of this study increase the understanding of the ecology of Bti applications for mosquito control, which can facilitate environmental risk assessment in connection with approval of microbiological control agents.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28600590 View in PubMed
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Emergency measures and mosquito control operations during the 1975 western encephalomyelitis outbreak in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251092
Source
Can J Public Health. 1976 May-Jun;67 Suppl 1:59-60
Publication Type
Article

53 records – page 1 of 6.