Skip header and navigation

Refine By

146 records – page 1 of 15.

Adult health in the Russian Federation: more than just a health problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162459
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Patricio Marquez
Marc Suhrcke
Martin McKee
Lorenzo Rocco
Author Affiliation
World Bank. Washington, DC, USA. pmarquez@worldbank.org
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 2007 Jul-Aug;26(4):1040-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Birth Rate - trends
Chronic Disease - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - trends
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health status
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk-Taking
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Social Conditions
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Abstract
In this paper we discuss the Russian adult health crisis and its implications. Although some hope that economic growth will trigger improvements in health, we argue that a scenario is more likely in which the unfavorable health status would become a barrier to economic growth. We also show that ill health is negatively affecting the economic well-being of individuals and households. We provide suggestions on interventions to improve health conditions in the Russian Federation, and we show that if health improvements are achieved, this will result in substantial economic gains in the future.
PubMed ID
17630447 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol poisoning is a main determinant of recent mortality trends in Russia: evidence from a detailed analysis of mortality statistics and autopsies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155282
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):143-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
David Zaridze
Dimitri Maximovitch
Alexander Lazarev
Vladimir Igitov
Alex Boroda
Jillian Boreham
Peter Boyle
Richard Peto
Paolo Boffetta
Author Affiliation
Russian N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye shosse 24, 115478 Moscow, Russia.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):143-53
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - blood - mortality
Autopsy
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology - mortality
Ethanol - blood - poisoning
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The changes in Russian mortality rates during the last two decades are unprecedented in a modern industrialized country. Although these fluctuations have attracted much interest, trends for major groups of causes of death have been analysed while trends in specific causes of death might shed light on the underlying determinants.
We analysed trends in total and cause-specific mortality in Russia for 1991-2006. The records of 24 836 forensic autopsies carried out during the period 1990-2004 in the city of Barnaul were analysed with respect to blood alcohol level.
Diseases of the circulatory system (in the age group 35-69 years) and external causes (in the age group 15-34 years) were the main contributors to the fluctuations in Russian mortality rates observed in 1991-2006. The largest relative changes were for conditions directly related to alcohol intake. Among cardiovascular diseases, fluctuations were due to 'other forms' of acute and chronic ischaemia, and to atherosclerotic heart disease, while rates of myocardial infarction were low and relatively constant. In the autopsy series a very high proportion of decedents whose death was attributed to 'other' or 'not classified' cardiovascular diseases had lethal or potentially lethal concentrations of ethanol in blood.
The increases in mortality in 1991-94 and in 1998-2003 coincided with economic and societal crisis, while decreases in 1994-98 and 2003-06 correlate with improvement in the economic situation. Excessive alcohol intake is a major cause of premature male Russian mortality, although many alcohol-related deaths are wrongly attributed to diseases of the circulatory system.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):156-718812362
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):154-518824468
PubMed ID
18775875 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Approaches to analysis of population mortality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195867
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2000 Sep-Oct;(5):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
N G Petrova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2000 Sep-Oct;(5):19-22
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Russia
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The author emphasizes that the mortality phenomenon is heterogeneous, integrating many components with different impact, with different methodological approaches to their evaluation. This paper presents an integrative approach to analysis of mortality. The following components are analyzed: total and age-associated mortality, violent deaths, perinatal mortality, hospital mortality, and deaths at home.
PubMed ID
11190423 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birthweight and mortality in adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136987
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):647-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Kari R Risnes
Lars J Vatten
Jennifer L Baker
Karen Jameson
Ulla Sovio
Eero Kajantie
Merete Osler
Ruth Morley
Markus Jokela
Rebecca C Painter
Valter Sundh
Geir W Jacobsen
Johan G Eriksson
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Michael B Bracken
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. kari.risnes@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Jun;40(3):647-61
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Birth weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Abstract
Small birth size may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), whereas large birth size may predict increased risk of obesity and some cancers. The net effect of birth size on long-term mortality has only been assessed in individual studies, with conflicting results.
The Meta-analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines for conducting and reporting meta-analysis of observational studies were followed. We retrieved 22 studies that assessed the association between birthweight and adult mortality from all causes, CVD or cancer. The studies were systematically reviewed and those reporting hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) per kilogram (kg) increase in birthweight were included in generic inverse variance meta-analyses.
For all-cause mortality, 36,834 deaths were included and the results showed a 6% lower risk (adjusted HR?=?0.94, 95% CI: 0.92-0.97) per kg higher birthweight for men and women combined. For cardiovascular mortality, the corresponding inverse association was stronger (HR?=?0.88, 95% CI: 0.85-0.91). For cancer mortality, HR per kg higher birthweight was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.07-1.19) for men and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.98-1.10) for women (P(interaction)?=?0.03). Residual confounding could not be eliminated, but is unlikely to account for the main findings.
These results show an inverse but moderate association of birthweight with adult mortality from all-causes and a stronger inverse association with cardiovascular mortality. For men, higher birthweight was strongly associated with increased risk of cancer deaths. The findings suggest that birthweight can be a useful indicator of processes that influence long-term health.
PubMed ID
21324938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood alcohol concentrations in apprehended drivers of cars and boats suspected to be impaired by the police.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87049
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2008 Mar;9(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Khiabani Hassan Z
Opdal Mimi Stokke
Mørland Jørg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Forensic Toxicology and Drug Abuse, Oslo, Norway. hassan.khiabani@fhi.no
Source
Traffic Inj Prev. 2008 Mar;9(1):31-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Automobile Driving - legislation & jurisprudence
Breath Tests
Confidence Intervals
Ethanol - blood
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway
Police - standards
Probability
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Ships
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: According to the Norwegian Road Traffic Act, car drivers are not allowed to operate a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) above 0.2 g/kg. Depending on the size of the boat or ship, boat drivers/captains/first mates are not allowed to conduct the boat with a BAC above 0.8 g/kg when driving small boats (length less than 15 m) and above 1.5 g/kg when running larger vessels/ships. The new Sea Act of June 2005 states that captains/first mates cannot conduct a ship if he/she has a BAC above 0.2 g/kg. Our aim was to determine the current median BAC in a large population of car and boat drivers in Norway. Our other aim was to study if median BAC was higher in boat drivers than in car drivers who were suspected by the police to be impaired. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate if the BAC levels were differently distributed by gender or age within and between these two groups. METHODS: The Norwegian Institute of Public Health analyzes blood samples from all car/boat drivers suspected of driving under the influence of alcohol and non-alcoholic drugs. In the present study, samples submitted between 01.05 and 01.09 in 2002-2004 were included. Drivers, who in addition tested positive for drugs or abuse substances other than ethanol were excluded. RESULTS: There were 321 boat drivers and 3,061 car drivers who were suspected to be under the influence of ethanol only. The median BAC in boat drivers (1.76 g/kg [range 0.02-3.54]) was significantly higher compared to that in car drivers (1.54 g/kg [range 0.00-4.27]). In the car driver group, the mean BAC did not differ significantly between men and women. The median level of BAC was significantly higher in men than in women in the boat driver group (1.77 g/kg with CI 1.69-1.85 vs. 1.27 g/kg with CI 0.78-1.76). CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol impairment of car drivers is known to be considered the most important contributing cause of car crash injuries. Driving a boat may demand the same degree of performance skills as driving a car. The median BAC in apprehended boat drivers was considerably high in the present study. The median BAC was also high in car drivers despite strict legislation. The population of drivers of cars in our study, however, is from previous studies known to contain a large proportion of heavy drinkers. Less is known about the drinking habits in boat drivers, and caution is needed in generalizing from our results. However, our results indicate the possible need for stricter legislation and more frequent police control that will hopefully prevent serious accidents caused by ethanol drinking at sea.
PubMed ID
18338292 View in PubMed
Less detail

A broader perspective on education and mortality: are we influenced by other people's education?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93910
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Feb;66(3):620-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Kravdal Øystein
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Oslo, Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway. okravdal@econ.uio.no
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Feb;66(3):620-36
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Educational Status
Family
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Quality of Health Care
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Spouses
Abstract
The objective of this study was to find out whether the educational achievements of family members and people in the municipality have an impact on a person's mortality, net of the well-known strong influence of his or her own education. Using register data, discrete-time hazard models for all-cause mortality in 1980-2003 were estimated for all Norwegian men and women born between 1950 and 1973 (i.e. age 30-53). There were 23,692 deaths during the 19.1 million person-years of follow-up. The education of a former or current spouse had the clearest beneficial effect, although own education was more important. Mortality was also negatively associated with the education of the oldest sibling and to a lesser extent with that of the sibling-in-law and father-in-law. The average education in the municipality was not generally related to mortality, but a beneficial effect was seen among men with college education. In contrast to this, parents' education affected mortality adversely, especially among women. The data did not allow causal pathways to be identified, but possible mechanisms were discussed. For example, it was argued that others' education may affect mortality favourably through transmission of knowledge, imitation of behaviour, economic support, and the quality of health services. In some societies, childhood health might also be an issue. On the other hand, having better-educated family members or living in a community with many better-educated people, who typically also have higher incomes, may trigger psychosocial stress. However, one should be careful to interpret the observed relationships as reflecting purely causal effects. Various unobserved factors may influence the person's choice of spouse and place of residence as well as mortality, and having parents with higher (lower) education may signal that the person has had special problems (resources) during childhood or adolescence, which also may have implications for later health.
PubMed ID
18023954 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence, mortality and survival trends in Canada, 1970-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115752
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2013 Mar;33(2):69-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
L. Kachuri
P. De
L F Ellison
R. Semenciw
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2013 Mar;33(2):69-80
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Early Detection of Cancer - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Neoplasms - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Vital statistics
Abstract
Monitoring cancer trends can help evaluate progress in cancer control while reinforcing prevention activities. This analysis examines long-term trends for selected cancers in Canada using data from national databases.
Annual changes in trends for age-standardized incidence and mortality rates between 1970 and 2007 were examined by sex for 1) all cancers combined, 2) the four most common cancers (prostate, breast, lung, colorectal) and 3) cancers that demonstrate the most recent notable changes in trend. Five-year relative survival for 1992-2007 was also calculated.
Incidence rates for all primary cancer cases combined increased 0.9% per year in males and 0.8% per year in females over the study period, with varying degrees of increase for melanoma, thyroid, liver, prostate, kidney, colorectal, lung, breast, and bladder cancers and decrease for larynx, oral, stomach and cervical cancers. Mortality rates were characterized by significant declines for all cancers combined and for most cancers examined except for melanoma and female lung cancer. The largest improvements in cancer survival were for prostate, liver, colorectal and kidney cancers. While the overall trends in mortality rates and survival point to notable successes in cancer control, the increasing trend in incidence rates for some cancers emphasize the need for continued efforts in prevention.
PubMed ID
23470172 View in PubMed
Less detail

146 records – page 1 of 15.