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Acute fatal effects of short-lasting extreme temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: evidence across a century of change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107127
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Daniel Oudin Åström
Bertil Forsberg
Sören Edvinsson
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; bAgeing and Living Conditions Programme, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; cCentre for Population Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; and dDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.
We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.
Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.
Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.
PubMed ID
24051892 View in PubMed
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Adolescent reserve capacity, socioeconomic status and school achievement as predictors of mortality in Finland - a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291125
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 12 28; 17(1):980
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-28-2017
Author
Paulyn Jean Acacio-Claro
Leena Kristiina Koivusilta
Judith Rafaelita Borja
Arja Hannele Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Claro.Paulyn.J@student.uta.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 12 28; 17(1):980
Date
12-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Academic Success
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality - trends
Social Class
Social Support
Abstract
Despite robust evidence on the inverse relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and mortality, deviations from expected results have been observed likely due to school achievement and psychosocial resources, termed as "reserve capacity." Since adolescence is a critical period in developing sound psychological and behavioural patterns and adolescent markers of SES were seldom used, we determine if family SES in adolescence predicts later mortality. We also study how reserve capacity (perceived health, health-promoting behaviour and social support) and school achievement modify this relationship and reduce the negative effects of low SES.
A longitudinal study was designed by linking baseline data on 12 to 18 year-old Finns in 1985-95 (N =?41,833) from the Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Surveys with register data on mortality and SES from Statistics Finland. Average follow-up time was 18.4 years with a total of 770,161 person-years. Cox regression models, stratified by sex, were fitted to determine the effects of variables measured during adolescence: family SES, reserve capacity and school achievement on mortality risk.
All reserve capacity dimensions significantly predicted mortality in boys. Perceived health and social support predicted that in girls. Adolescents with the lowest school achievement were more than twice at risk of dying compared to those with better school performance. Low SES increased the risk of death in boys (Hazard ratios: 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4) but not in girls. Reserve capacity and school achievement weakened the effects of low SES on boys' risk of death.
High reserve capacity and good school achievement in adolescence significantly reduce the risk of mortality. In boys, these also mitigate the negative effect of low SES on mortality. These findings underscore the roles of reserve capacity and school achievement during adolescence as likely causal or modifying factors in SES-health inequalities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282033 View in PubMed
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Age-specific mortality risk from pandemic influenza.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131986
Source
J Theor Biol. 2011 Nov 7;288:29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-2011
Author
Junling Ma
Jonathan Dushoff
David J D Earn
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
J Theor Biol. 2011 Nov 7;288:29-34
Date
Nov-7-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cytokines - biosynthesis
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - immunology - mortality
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
Pandemics
Risk Assessment - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Younger age groups account for proportionally more mortality in influenza pandemics than in seasonal influenza epidemics. Mechanisms that might explain this include young people suffering from an over-reactive immune system ("cytokine storm"), older people benefiting from cross-immunity from a wider variety of previous influenza infections ("antigenic history"), and lifetime immune responses in all people being shaped by their first influenza A infection ("antigenic imprinting" or "original antigenic sin"). We examined whether these mechanisms can explain age-specific influenza mortality patterns, using the complete database of individual deaths in Canada from 1951 to 1999. The mortality pattern during the 1957 pandemic indicates that antigenic imprinting plays an important role in determining age-specific influenza virulence and that both shift years and major drift years contribute significantly to antigenic imprints. This information should help pandemic planners to identify age groups that might respond differently to novel influenza strains.
PubMed ID
21856313 View in PubMed
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Source
Public Health Rep. 2003 Nov-Dec;118(6):518-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gretchen Ehrsam Day
Anne P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Office of Alaska Native Health Research, Division of Community Health Services, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. day747@gci.net
Source
Public Health Rep. 2003 Nov-Dec;118(6):518-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Death Certificates
Disease - classification - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study compares mortality patterns for the Alaska Native population and the U.S. white population for 1989-1998 and examines trends for the 20-year period 1979-1998. METHODS: The authors used death certificate data and Indian Health Service population estimates to calculate mortality rates for the Alaska Native population, age-adjusted to the U.S. 1940 standard million. Data on population and mortality for U.S. whites, aggregated by 10-year age groups and by gender, were obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics, and U.S. white mortality rates were age-adjusted to the U.S. 1940 standard million. RESULTS: Overall, 1989-1998 Alaska Native mortality rates were 60% higher than those for the U.S. white population for the same period. There were significant disparities for eight of 10 leading causes of death, particularly unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide/legal intervention. Although declines in injury rates can be documented for the period 1979-1998, large disparities still exist. Alaska Native death rates for cancer, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes increased from 1979 to 1998. Given decreases in some cause-specific mortality rates in the U.S. white population, increased rates among Alaska Natives have resulted in new disparities. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that improvements in injury mortality rates are offset by marked increases in chronic disease deaths.
PubMed ID
14563909 View in PubMed
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Alaska native mortality rates and trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89168
Source
Public Health Rep. 2009 Jan-Feb;124(1):54-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
Day Gretchen Ehrsam
Provost Ellen
Lanier Anne P
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Epidemiology Center, Office of Alaska Native Health Research, Division of Community Health Services, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Dr., C-DCHS, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. gmday@anmc.org
Source
Public Health Rep. 2009 Jan-Feb;124(1):54-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Population Groups
SEER Program
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This article compared mortality data (1999-2003) for Alaska Natives (AN), U.S. white residents (USW), and Alaska white residents (AKW), and examined changes in mortality rates from 1979 to 2003. METHODS: We used SEERStat* software from the National Cancer Institute to calculate age-adjusted mortality rates. RESULTS: The AN all-cause mortality rate was 40% higher (rate ratio [RR]=1.4) than the rate for both the USW and AKW populations. Based on comparisons with USW, the largest disparities in AN mortality were found for unintentional injuries (RR=3.0), suicide (RR=3.1), and homicide (RR=4.4). Disparities were also found for eight of the 10 leading causes of death, including cancer (AN/USW RR=1.3), cerebrovascular disease (RR=1.3), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR=1.4), pneumonia/influenza (RR=1.6), and chronic liver disease (RR=2.0). In contrast, the mortality rate for heart disease among AN was significantly lower (RR=0.9) than for USW, and lower-though not significantly lower-for diabetes. Findings were quite similar when rates for AN were compared with AKW. AKW also had high rates of unintentional injury mortality and suicide compared with USW, but the magnitude of the difference was much less for AKW. From 1979 to 2003, mortality rates among AN declined 16% for all causes, similar to the USW decline of 15%. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring mortality rates and their trends is essential not only to understand the health status of a population but also to target areas for prevention and evaluate the impact of policy change or the effect of interventions over time.
PubMed ID
19413028 View in PubMed
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[Approaches to analysis of population mortality].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195867
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2000 Sep-Oct;(5):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
N G Petrova
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2000 Sep-Oct;(5):19-22
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Russia
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The author emphasizes that the mortality phenomenon is heterogeneous, integrating many components with different impact, with different methodological approaches to their evaluation. This paper presents an integrative approach to analysis of mortality. The following components are analyzed: total and age-associated mortality, violent deaths, perinatal mortality, hospital mortality, and deaths at home.
PubMed ID
11190423 View in PubMed
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Are health inequalities really not the smallest in the Nordic welfare states? A comparison of mortality inequality in 37 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116543
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 May;67(5):412-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Frank Popham
Chris Dibben
Clare Bambra
Author Affiliation
MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, 4 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow, UK. f.popham@sphsu.mrc.ac.uk
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 May;67(5):412-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Internationality
Life expectancy
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Social Welfare
Young Adult
Abstract
Research comparing mortality by socioeconomic status has found that inequalities are not the smallest in the Nordic countries. This is in contrast to expectations given these countries' policy focus on equity. An alternative way of studying inequality has been little used to compare inequalities across welfare states and may yield a different conclusion.
We used average life expectancy lost per death as a measure of total inequality in mortality derived from death rates from the Human Mortality Database for 37 countries in 2006 that we grouped by welfare state type. We constructed a theoretical 'lowest mortality comparator country' to study, by age, why countries were not achieving the smallest inequality and the highest life expectancy. We also studied life expectancy as there is an important correlation between it and inequality.
On average, Nordic countries had the highest life expectancy and smallest inequalities for men but not women. For both men and women, Nordic countries had particularly low younger age mortality contributing to smaller inequality and higher life expectancy. Although older age mortality in the Nordic countries is not the smallest. There was variation within Nordic countries with Sweden, Iceland and Norway having higher life expectancy and smaller inequalities than Denmark and Finland (for men).
Our analysis suggests that the Nordic countries do have the smallest inequalities in mortality for men and for younger age groups. However, this is not the case for women. Reducing premature mortality among older age groups would increase life expectancy and reduce inequality further in Nordic countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23386671 View in PubMed
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Are recessions really good for your health? Evidence from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126690
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Apr;74(8):1224-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Hideki Ariizumi
Tammy Schirle
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue W., Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3C5.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2012 Apr;74(8):1224-31
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Economic Recession
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study investigates the relationship between business cycle fluctuations and health in the Canadian context, given that a procyclical relationship between mortality rates and unemployment rates has already been well established in the U.S. literature. Using a fixed effects model and provincial data over the period 1977-2009, we estimate the effect of unemployment rates on Canadian age and gender specific mortality rates. Consistent with U.S. results, there is some evidence of a strong procyclical pattern in the mortality rates of middle-aged Canadians. We find that a one percentage point increase in the unemployment rate lowers the predicted mortality rate of individuals in their 30s by nearly 2 percent. In contrast to the U.S. data, we do not find a significant cyclical pattern in the mortality rates of infants and seniors.
PubMed ID
22365938 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the effectiveness of radon screening programs in reducing lung cancer mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155396
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Oct;28(5):1221-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Fabien Gagnon
Mathieu Courchesne
Benoît Lévesque
Pierre Ayotte
Jean-Marc Leclerc
Jean-Claude Belles-Isles
Claude Prévost
Jean-Claude Dessau
Author Affiliation
Faculté de Médecine et des sciences de la Santé, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. fabien.gagnon@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Oct;28(5):1221-30
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Female
Housing
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Mass Screening - standards
Mortality - trends
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Radiation Monitoring - standards
Radon - analysis
Risk Assessment - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study was aimed at assessing the health consequences of the presence of radon in Quebec homes and the possible impact of various screening programs on lung cancer mortality. Lung cancer risk due to this radioactive gas was estimated according to the cancer risk model developed by the Sixth Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations. Objective data on residential radon exposure, population mobility, and tobacco use in the study population were integrated into a Monte-Carlo-type model. Participation rates to radon screening programs were estimated from published data. According to the model used, approximately 10% of deaths due to lung cancer are attributable to residential radon exposure on a yearly basis in Quebec. In the long term, the promotion of a universal screening program would prevent less than one death/year on a province-wide scale (0.8 case; IC 99%: -3.6 to 5.2 cases/year), for an overall reduction of 0.19% in radon-related mortality. Reductions in mortality due to radon by (1) the implementation of a targeted screening program in the region with the highest concentrations, (2) the promotion of screening on a local basis with financial support, or (3) the realization of systematic investigations in primary and secondary schools would increase to 1%, 14%, and 16.4%, respectively, in the each of the populations targeted by these scenarios. Other than the battle against tobacco use, radon screening in public buildings thus currently appears as the most promising screening policy for reducing radon-related lung cancer.
PubMed ID
18761730 View in PubMed
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233 records – page 1 of 24.