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10 year follow up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9689
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2003
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Nina Wandall-Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. merete.nordentoft@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Date
Jul-12-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, and to identify predictors of death such as conditions during upbringing, mental illness, and misuse of alcohol and drugs. DESIGN: Register based follow up study. SETTING: Two hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 579 people who stayed in one hostel in Copenhagen in 1991, and a representative sample of 185 people who stayed in the original hostel and one other in Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cause specific mortality. RESULTS: The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for both sexes was 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 4.1); 2.8 (2.6 to 3.1) for men and 5.6 (4.3 to 6.9) for women. The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for suicide for both sexes was 6.0 (3.9 to 8.1), for death from natural causes 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9), for unintentional injuries 14.6 (11.4 to 17.8), and for unknown cause of death 62.9 (52.7 to 73.2). Mortality was comparatively higher in the younger age groups. It was also significantly higher among homeless people who had stayed in a hostel more than once and stayed fewer than 11 days, compared with the rest of the study group. Risk factors for early death were premature death of the father and misuse of alcohol and sedatives. CONCLUSION: Homeless people staying in hostels, particularly young women, are more likely to die early than the general population. Other predictors of early death include adverse experiences in childhood, such as death of the father, and misuse of alcohol and sedatives.
PubMed ID
12855527 View in PubMed
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16-year excess all-cause mortality of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147637
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:400
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lars J Hansen
Niels de Fine Olivarius
Volkert Siersma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, The Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. l.hansen@gpract.ku.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:400
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Studies have shown that type 2 diabetic patients have higher all-cause mortality than people without diabetes, but it is less clear how diabetes affects mortality in elderly patients and to what degree mortality differs between diabetic men and women. The aim of the present study is to investigate the age- and sex-specific all-cause mortality pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes in comparison with the Danish background population.
Population-based cohort study of 1323 patients, diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes in 1989-92 and followed for 16 years. Median (interquartile range) age at diagnosis was 65.3 (55.8-73.6) years. The age- and sex-specific hazard rates were estimated for the cohort using the life table method and compared with the expected hazard rates calculated with Danish register data from the general population.
In comparison with the general population, diabetic patients had a 1.5-2.5 fold higher risk of dying depending on age. The over-mortality was higher for men than for women. It decreased with age in both sexes, and among patients over 80 years at diagnosis the difference between the observed and the expected survival was small.
We found an excess mortality of type 2 diabetic patients compared with the background population in all age groups. The excess mortality was most pronounced in men and in young patients.
Notes
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Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jun 9;322(7299):1389-9311397742
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Oct 27;323(7319):970-511679387
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 Jun;27(6):1299-30515161779
Cites: Diabetologia. 1977 Aug;13(4):345-50913925
Cites: Diabetologia. 1981 Jun;20(6):587-917262474
Cites: Ann Clin Res. 1983;15 Suppl 37:26-86679186
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1986 May-Jun;9(3):313-53731999
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1991 Jun;151(6):1141-72043016
PubMed ID
19878574 View in PubMed
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Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133259
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Morten A Schrøder
Jesper Brøndum Poulsen
Anders Perner
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, 4131, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København Ø, Denmark. mortenschroder@gmail.com
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Statistics, nonparametric
Survivors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.
The outcome status for 91 elderly (=75 years) and 659 nonelderly (18-74 years) ICU patients treated in the course of a one year period was obtained. A total of 36 of 37 eligible elderly survivors were interviewed about their health related quality of life (HRQOL), social services and their wish for intensive care.
The mortality (54% at follow-up and 64% after one year) was higher in the elderly ICU patients than in non-elderly ICU patients (33% and 37%, respectively, p
PubMed ID
21722543 View in PubMed
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Access to primary health care and health outcomes: the relationships between GP characteristics and mortality rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82292
Source
J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1139-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Aakvik Arild
Holmås Tor Helge
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Herman Fossg. 6, N-5007 Bergen, Norway. arild.aakvik@econ.uib.no
Source
J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1139-53
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Empirical Research
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care
Abstract
This paper analyses the impact of economic conditions and access to primary health care on health outcomes in Norway. Total mortality rates, grouped into four causes of death, were used as proxies for health, and the number of general practitioners (GPs) at the municipality level was used as the proxy for access to primary health care. Dynamic panel data models that allow for time persistence in mortality rates, incorporate municipal fixed effects, and treat both the number and types of GPs in a district as endogenous were estimated using municipality data from 1986 to 2001. We reject the significant relationship between mortality and the number of GPs per capita found in most previous studies. However, there is a significant effect of the composition of GPs, where an increase in the number of contracted GPs reduces mortality rates when compared with GPs employed directly by the municipality.
PubMed ID
16675052 View in PubMed
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Acute fatal effects of short-lasting extreme temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: evidence across a century of change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107127
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Daniel Oudin Åström
Bertil Forsberg
Sören Edvinsson
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; bAgeing and Living Conditions Programme, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; cCentre for Population Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; and dDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.
We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.
Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.
Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.
PubMed ID
24051892 View in PubMed
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Acute hospital use, nursing home placement, and mortality in a frail community-dwelling cohort managed with Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123476
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ted Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. trosenberg@gem-health.com
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Demography
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Nursing Homes - utilization
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of medical Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home (PIECH) on acute hospital use and mortality in a frail elderly population.
Comparison of acute hospital care use for the year before entering the practice (pre-entry) with the most-recent 12-month period (May 1, 2010-April 30, 2011, postentry) for active and discharged patients.
Community.
All 248 frail elderly adults enrolled in the practice for at least 12 months who were living in the community and not in nursing homes in Victoria, British Columbia.
Primary geriatric care provided by a physician, nurse, and physiotherapist in participants' homes.
Acute hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) contacts that did not lead to admission, reason for leaving practice, and site of death.
There was a 39.7% (116 vs 70; P = .004) reduction in hospital admissions, 37.6% (1,700 vs 1,061; P = .04) reduction in hospital days, and 20% (120 vs 95; P = .20) reduction in ED contacts after entering the practice. Fifty participants were discharged from the practice, 64% (n = 32) of whom died, 20% (n = 10) moved, and 16% (n = 8) were admitted to nursing homes. Fifteen (46.9%) deaths occurred at home.
Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home may reduce acute hospital admissions and facilitate home deaths.
PubMed ID
22694020 View in PubMed
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Acute poisonings treated in hospitals in Oslo: a one-year prospective study (II): clinical outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93789
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):42-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Heyerdahl Fridtjof
Bjornas Mari A
Hovda Knut Erik
Skog Karina
Opdahl Anders
Wium Cecilie
Ekeberg Oivind
Jacobsen Dag
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. fridtjof.heyerdahl@medisin.uio.no
Source
Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2008 Jan;46(1):42-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidotes - therapeutic use
Coma - chemically induced
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Flumazenil - therapeutic use
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Naloxone - therapeutic use
Norway
Poisoning - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Street Drugs - poisoning
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The changing pattern of acute poisoning may affect complications and outcome in these patients. An update study on acute poisonings was therefore performed and compared to similar data from 1980. DESIGN. A prospective cross-sectional multi-center study of all adult patients (> or = 16 years) hospitalized in Oslo with a main diagnosis of acute poisoning, irrespective of intention, over a one-year period. RESULTS. Of 947 admissions, 222 (23%) were comatose. Complications were observed in 173 (18%), slightly reduced from 1980 (22%). Ten (1.1%) died and six (0.6%) got permanent sequelae, of which seven and five were drug- or alcohol-related, respectively. Seventy-five percent received treatment besides observation; 39% received antidotes, increased from 21% in 1980, most frequently flumazenil (23%) and naloxone (14%). CONCLUSIONS. In-hospital mortality in poisoned patients remained low, few patients entailed complications, and most patients survived without permanent sequelae. Drug- and alcohol-abuse related poisonings were most severe.
PubMed ID
18167036 View in PubMed
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Age at natural menopause and all-cause mortality: a 37-year follow-up of 19,731 Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67331
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 May 15;157(10):923-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2003
Author
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Ivar Heuch
Gunnar Kvåle
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. bjarne.jacobsen@ism.uit.no
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 May 15;157(10):923-9
Date
May-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Menopause - physiology
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
In a cohort of 19,731 Norwegian postmenopausal women, the authors analyzed relations between the age at natural menopause and all-cause mortality. A total of 18,533 women died during the 37 years of follow-up from 1961 to 1997. An inverse relation was found between the age at menopause and the all-cause mortality rate (p = 0.003). The strength of the association was moderate, however, with 1.6% (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 2.7) reduced mortality per 3 years' increase in age at menopause. The impact appeared to be stronger in women with an attained age of less than 70 years (3.7% reduction in risk) than in women aged 80 years or more (1.0%). The inverse relation could not be explained by extreme mortality rates in women with very early (55 years) menopause or by possible confounding variables like birth cohort, place of residence, occupational category (own or husband's occupation), body mass index, age at menarche, and first and last delivery or parity. The smoking prevalence was low in the underlying population, and the use of hormone replacement therapy was very rare. The authors conclude that age at natural menopause is inversely related to all-cause mortality.
PubMed ID
12746245 View in PubMed
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Age disparities in stroke quality of care and delivery of health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149008
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Gustavo Saposnik
Sandra E Black
Antoine Hakim
Jiming Fang
Jack V Tu
Moira K Kapral
Author Affiliation
Stroke Research Unit, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. saposnikg@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Deglutition Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - economics
Hospital Units - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics
Patient Discharge - economics
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - mortality - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Limited information is available on the effect of age on stroke management and care delivery. Our aim was to determine whether access to stroke care, delivery of health services, and clinical outcomes after stroke are affected by age.
This was a prospective cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, admitted to stroke centers participating in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network between July 1, 2003 and March 31, 2005. Primary outcomes were the following selected indicators of quality stroke care: (1) use of thrombolysis; (2) dysphagia screening; (3) admission to a stroke unit; (4) carotid imaging; (5) antithrombotic therapy; and (6) warfarin for atrial fibrillation at discharge. Secondary outcomes were risk-adjusted stroke fatality, discharge disposition, pneumonia, and length of hospital stay.
Among 3631 patients with ischemic stroke, 1219 (33.6%) were older than 80 years. There were no significant differences in stroke care delivery by age group. Stroke fatality increased with age, with a 30-day risk adjusted fatality of 7.1%, 6.5%, 8.8%, and 14.8% for those aged 59 or younger, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80 years or older, respectively. Those aged older than 80 years had a longer length of hospitalization, increased risk of pneumonia, and higher disability at discharge compared to those younger than 80. This group was also less likely to be discharged home.
In the context of a province-wide coordinated stroke care system, stroke care delivery was similar across all age groups with the exception of slightly lower rates of investigations in the very elderly. Increasing age was associated with stroke severity and stroke case-fatality.
PubMed ID
19696418 View in PubMed
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Age-period-cohort effects on ischaemic heart disease mortality in Sweden from 1969 to 1993, and forecasts up to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54479
Source
Eur Heart J. 1997 Aug;18(8):1307-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
M. Peltonen
K. Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1997 Aug;18(8):1307-12
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: Mortality from ischaemic heart disease has been decreasing in most industrialized countries since the 1960s. The aim of this study was to analyse ischaemic heart disease mortality during 1969-1993 in Sweden, and to predict mortality trends until 2003. METHODS AND RESULTS: Age-period cohort models were used to analyse ischaemic heart disease mortality in Sweden between 1969 and 1993, and to predict age-specific death rates and total number of deaths for the periods 1994-1998 and 1999-2003. Mortality rates in the age group 25-89 years decreased from 719 to 487 per 100,000 for men, and from 402 to 215 per 100,000 for women over the study period (average annual decrease of 1.5% for men and 2.2% for women). The decline started earlier for women than for men. The ratio of age-adjusted mortality between men and women increased steadily over the study period. Predictions based on the full age-period cohort model for the period 1999-2003 gave mortality rates of 346 and 155 per 100,000 for men and women, respectively. Despite the ageing of the population, the total numbers of ischaemic heart disease deaths in Sweden are predicted to decline by approximately 25% in both men and women from 1989-93 to 1999-2003. CONCLUSION: A major decline in ischaemic heart disease mortality has been observed in the last 15 years in Sweden. Both factors, cohort and calendar period, contain information which helps explain the decline in ischaemic heart disease mortality trends in Sweden. Predictions indicate that the decline of both age-specific and total mortality is to continue.
PubMed ID
9458424 View in PubMed
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364 records – page 1 of 37.