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10 year follow up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9689
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2003
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Nina Wandall-Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. merete.nordentoft@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Date
Jul-12-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, and to identify predictors of death such as conditions during upbringing, mental illness, and misuse of alcohol and drugs. DESIGN: Register based follow up study. SETTING: Two hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 579 people who stayed in one hostel in Copenhagen in 1991, and a representative sample of 185 people who stayed in the original hostel and one other in Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cause specific mortality. RESULTS: The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for both sexes was 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 4.1); 2.8 (2.6 to 3.1) for men and 5.6 (4.3 to 6.9) for women. The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for suicide for both sexes was 6.0 (3.9 to 8.1), for death from natural causes 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9), for unintentional injuries 14.6 (11.4 to 17.8), and for unknown cause of death 62.9 (52.7 to 73.2). Mortality was comparatively higher in the younger age groups. It was also significantly higher among homeless people who had stayed in a hostel more than once and stayed fewer than 11 days, compared with the rest of the study group. Risk factors for early death were premature death of the father and misuse of alcohol and sedatives. CONCLUSION: Homeless people staying in hostels, particularly young women, are more likely to die early than the general population. Other predictors of early death include adverse experiences in childhood, such as death of the father, and misuse of alcohol and sedatives.
PubMed ID
12855527 View in PubMed
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[10-year follow-up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 26;166(18):1679-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2004

16-year excess all-cause mortality of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147637
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:400
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lars J Hansen
Niels de Fine Olivarius
Volkert Siersma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, The Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. l.hansen@gpract.ku.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:400
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Studies have shown that type 2 diabetic patients have higher all-cause mortality than people without diabetes, but it is less clear how diabetes affects mortality in elderly patients and to what degree mortality differs between diabetic men and women. The aim of the present study is to investigate the age- and sex-specific all-cause mortality pattern in patients with type 2 diabetes in comparison with the Danish background population.
Population-based cohort study of 1323 patients, diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes in 1989-92 and followed for 16 years. Median (interquartile range) age at diagnosis was 65.3 (55.8-73.6) years. The age- and sex-specific hazard rates were estimated for the cohort using the life table method and compared with the expected hazard rates calculated with Danish register data from the general population.
In comparison with the general population, diabetic patients had a 1.5-2.5 fold higher risk of dying depending on age. The over-mortality was higher for men than for women. It decreased with age in both sexes, and among patients over 80 years at diagnosis the difference between the observed and the expected survival was small.
We found an excess mortality of type 2 diabetic patients compared with the background population in all age groups. The excess mortality was most pronounced in men and in young patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19878574 View in PubMed
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A 20-year prospective study of mortality and causes of death among hospitalized opioid addicts in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87156
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bjornaas Mari A
Bekken Anette S
Ojlert Aasa
Haldorsen Tor
Jacobsen Dag
Rostrup Morten
Ekeberg Oivind
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. mabjornaas@gmail.com
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Mathematical Computing
Narcotics - poisoning
Neoplasms - mortality
Opioid-Related Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation
Overdose - mortality - prevention & control
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Street Drugs - poisoning
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To study mortality rate and causes of death among all hospitalized opioid addicts treated for self-poisoning or admitted for voluntary detoxification in Oslo between 1980 and 1981, and to compare their mortality to that of the general population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted on 185 opioid addicts from all medical departments in Oslo who were treated for either self-poisoning (n = 93, 1980), voluntary detoxification (n = 75, 1980/1981) or both (n = 17). Their median age was 24 years; with a range from 16 to 41, and 53% were males. All deaths that had occurred by the end of 2000 were identified from the Central Population Register. Causes of death were obtained from Statistics Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for mortality, in general, and in particular, for different causes of death. RESULTS: During a period of 20 years, 70 opioid addicts died (37.8%), with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) equal to 23.6 (95% CI, 18.7-29.9). The SMR remained high during the whole period, ranging from 32.4 in the first five-year period, to 13.4 in the last five-year period. There were no significant differences in SMR between self-poisonings and those admitted for voluntarily detoxification. The registered causes of death were accidents (11.4%), suicide (7.1%), cancer (4.3%), cardiovascular disease (2.9%), other violent deaths (2.9%), other diseases (71.4%). Among the 50 deaths classified as other diseases, the category "drug dependence" was listed in the vast majority of cases (37 deaths, 52.9% of the total). SMRs increased significantly for all causes of death, with the other diseases group having the highest SMR; 65.8 (95% CI, 49.9-86.9). The SMR was 5.4 (95% CI, 1.3-21.5) for cardiovascular diseases, and 4.3 (95% CI, 1.4-13.5) for cancer. The SMR was 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-26.4) for accidents, 10.7 (95% CI, 4.5-25.8) for suicides, and 28.6 (95% CI, 7.1-114.4) for other violent deaths. CONCLUSION: The risk of death among opioid addicts was significantly higher for all causes of death compared with the general population, implying a poor prognosis over a 20-year period for this young patient group.
PubMed ID
18271956 View in PubMed
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Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
Cites: Curr Opin Pediatr. 2007 Jun;19(3):265-917505184
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Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;70(1):129-3723337682
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Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2013 May;95(4):241-523676806
Cites: J Surg Educ. 2013 Sep-Oct;70(5):618-2724016373
PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
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Abortion-related maternal mortality in the Russian Federation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177681
Source
Stud Fam Plann. 2004 Sep;35(3):178-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Irina Alekseevna Zhirova
Olga Grigorievna Frolova
Tatiana Mikhailovna Astakhova
Evert Ketting
Author Affiliation
Medicosocial Studies and Problem-analysis Department, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow.
Source
Stud Fam Plann. 2004 Sep;35(3):178-88
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Cause of Death
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Maternal Mortality - trends
Pregnancy
Russia
Abstract
This study examines characteristics and determinants of maternal mortality associated with induced and spontaneous abortion in the Russian Federation. In addition to national statistical data, the study uses the original medical files of 113 women, representing 74 percent of all women known to have died after undergoing an abortion in 1999. The number of abortions and abortion-related maternal deaths fell fairly steadily during the 1991-2000 decade to levels of 56 percent and 52 percent of the 1991 base, respectively. Regional and urban-rural variation is limited. Nine percent of abortion-related maternal mortality is due to spontaneous abortion; 24 percent is related to induced abortions performed inside and 67 percent to those performed outside a medical institution. In the latter group, older women, usually with a history of several pregnancies, are overrepresented. The high rate of abortion-related maternal mortality is due largely to the number of abortions performed at 13-21 weeks' and 22-27 weeks' gestation both inside and outside medical institutions. Improving access to safe second-trimester abortion, preventing delays during the abortion procedure, and adequate treatment of complications are key strategies for reducing abortion-related maternal mortality.
PubMed ID
15511061 View in PubMed
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Acceptable long-term outcome in elderly intensive care unit patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133259
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Morten A Schrøder
Jesper Brøndum Poulsen
Anders Perner
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Unit, 4131, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 København Ø, Denmark. mortenschroder@gmail.com
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jul;58(7):A4297
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Statistics, nonparametric
Survivors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The number of elderly intensive care unit (ICU) patients is increasing. We therefore assessed the long-term outcome in the elderly following intensive care.
The outcome status for 91 elderly (=75 years) and 659 nonelderly (18-74 years) ICU patients treated in the course of a one year period was obtained. A total of 36 of 37 eligible elderly survivors were interviewed about their health related quality of life (HRQOL), social services and their wish for intensive care.
The mortality (54% at follow-up and 64% after one year) was higher in the elderly ICU patients than in non-elderly ICU patients (33% and 37%, respectively, p
PubMed ID
21722543 View in PubMed
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Access to primary health care and health outcomes: the relationships between GP characteristics and mortality rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82292
Source
J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1139-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Aakvik Arild
Holmås Tor Helge
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Herman Fossg. 6, N-5007 Bergen, Norway. arild.aakvik@econ.uib.no
Source
J Health Econ. 2006 Nov;25(6):1139-53
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Empirical Research
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physicians, Family
Primary Health Care
Abstract
This paper analyses the impact of economic conditions and access to primary health care on health outcomes in Norway. Total mortality rates, grouped into four causes of death, were used as proxies for health, and the number of general practitioners (GPs) at the municipality level was used as the proxy for access to primary health care. Dynamic panel data models that allow for time persistence in mortality rates, incorporate municipal fixed effects, and treat both the number and types of GPs in a district as endogenous were estimated using municipality data from 1986 to 2001. We reject the significant relationship between mortality and the number of GPs per capita found in most previous studies. However, there is a significant effect of the composition of GPs, where an increase in the number of contracted GPs reduces mortality rates when compared with GPs employed directly by the municipality.
PubMed ID
16675052 View in PubMed
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Acute fatal effects of short-lasting extreme temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: evidence across a century of change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107127
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Daniel Oudin Åström
Bertil Forsberg
Sören Edvinsson
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
From the aDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; bAgeing and Living Conditions Programme, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; cCentre for Population Studies, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; and dDepartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Division of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 2013 Nov;24(6):820-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Risk
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.
We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.
Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.
Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.
PubMed ID
24051892 View in PubMed
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Acute hospital use, nursing home placement, and mortality in a frail community-dwelling cohort managed with Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123476
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ted Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. trosenberg@gem-health.com
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Demography
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Nursing Homes - utilization
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of medical Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home (PIECH) on acute hospital use and mortality in a frail elderly population.
Comparison of acute hospital care use for the year before entering the practice (pre-entry) with the most-recent 12-month period (May 1, 2010-April 30, 2011, postentry) for active and discharged patients.
Community.
All 248 frail elderly adults enrolled in the practice for at least 12 months who were living in the community and not in nursing homes in Victoria, British Columbia.
Primary geriatric care provided by a physician, nurse, and physiotherapist in participants' homes.
Acute hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) contacts that did not lead to admission, reason for leaving practice, and site of death.
There was a 39.7% (116 vs 70; P = .004) reduction in hospital admissions, 37.6% (1,700 vs 1,061; P = .04) reduction in hospital days, and 20% (120 vs 95; P = .20) reduction in ED contacts after entering the practice. Fifty participants were discharged from the practice, 64% (n = 32) of whom died, 20% (n = 10) moved, and 16% (n = 8) were admitted to nursing homes. Fifteen (46.9%) deaths occurred at home.
Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home may reduce acute hospital admissions and facilitate home deaths.
PubMed ID
22694020 View in PubMed
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1560 records – page 1 of 156.