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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
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2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
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[3 reports on population health. Who will take care of my health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225541
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Oct 16;88(42):3443-6, 3451-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1991

A 3-year clinical follow-up of adult patients with 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82145
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Majamaa-Voltti K A M
Winqvist S.
Remes A M
Tolonen U.
Pyhtinen J.
Uimonen S.
Kärppä M.
Sorri M.
Peuhkurinen K.
Majamaa K.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. kirsi.majamaa-voltti@oulu.fi
Source
Neurology. 2006 May 23;66(10):1470-5
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cognition Disorders - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - genetics
Disease Progression
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Electroencephalography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - genetics
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - genetics - ultrasonography
Lactates - blood
MELAS Syndrome - genetics - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mitochondria, Muscle - metabolism
Mosaicism
Neuropsychological Tests
Point Mutation
Pyruvates - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To follow the clinical course of patients with the mitochondrial DNA mutation 3243A>G for 3 years. METHODS: Thirty-three adult patients with the 3243A>G mutation entered a 3-year follow-up study. They were clinically evaluated annually, audiometry was performed, and samples were drawn for the analysis of blood chemistry and mutation heteroplasmy in leukocytes. Holter recording was performed three times during the follow-up and echocardiography, neuropsychological assessment, and quantitative EEG and brain imaging conducted at entry and after 3 years. RESULTS: The incidence of new neurologic events was low during the 3-year follow-up. Sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) progressed, left ventricular wall thickness increased, mean alpha frequency in the occipital and parietal regions decreased, and the severity of disease index (modified Rankin score) progressed significantly. The rate of SNHI progression correlated with mutation heteroplasmy in muscle. The increase in left ventricular wall thickness was seen almost exclusively in diabetic patients. Seven patients died during the follow-up, and they were generally more severely affected than those who survived. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in the severity of disease, sensorineural hearing impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, and quantitative EEG were seen in adult patients with 3243A>G during the 3-year follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2007 Jan 9;68(2):163-417210904
PubMed ID
16717204 View in PubMed
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3-year follow-up of patients randomised in the metoprolol in dilated cardiomyopathy trial. The Metoprolol in Dilated Cardiomyopathy (MDC) Trial Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10861
Source
Lancet. 1998 Apr 18;351(9110):1180-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-1998

[3-year mortality of uterine cervix cancer in relation to the preliminary cervical cytological examination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25769
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 3;150(40):2400-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1988
Source
Nature. 1987 Feb 12-18;325(6105):569
Publication Type
Article
Source
Nature. 1987 Feb 12-18;325(6105):569
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Humans
Neoplasms - mortality
Nuclear Reactors
Ukraine
PubMed ID
3808056 View in PubMed
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24524 records – page 1 of 2453.