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169 records – page 1 of 17.

[1967-82, an evaluation of the Swedish experience with maintenance methadone therapy of morphine addicts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242669
Source
Minerva Med. 1982 Dec 8;73(47):3353-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-1982
Author
M. Scordato
Source
Minerva Med. 1982 Dec 8;73(47):3353-8
Date
Dec-8-1982
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Methadone - therapeutic use
Morphine Dependence - drug therapy - rehabilitation
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Since 1967, 170 heroin addicts have used methadone-based maintenance therapy. The experimental programme, confined to the Uppsala Psychiatric Clinic, followed the Dole-Nyswander method. Evaluation of the results shows the therapy to be successful in reducing mortality and permanent disability rates in heroin users. In addition it was found that addicts included in the programme were more likely to achieve complete social rehabilitation. In spite of much criticism, the experiment was sufficiently successful to justify its continuation, though still within the limits and along the lines adopted in the past.
PubMed ID
7177464 View in PubMed
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The ABCB1, rs9282564, AG and TT genotypes and the COMT, rs4680, AA genotype are less frequent in deceased patients with opioid addiction than in living patients with opioid addiction

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280048
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2016 Oct;119(4):381-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Christoffersen DJ
Damkier P
Feddersen S
Möller S
Thomsen JL
Brasch-Andersen C
Brøsen K
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2016 Oct;119(4):381-8
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Catechol O-Methyltransferase - genetics - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Death, Sudden - etiology
Denmark
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Methadone - blood - toxicity
Middle Aged
Morphine - blood - toxicity
Morphine Dependence - genetics - metabolism - mortality - physiopathology
Narcotics - blood - toxicity
P-Glycoproteins - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Young Adult
Abstract
Sudden death due to acute intoxication occurs frequently in patients with opioid addiction (OA). To examine whether certain genotypes were associated with this, we examined the frequencies of 29 SNPs located in candidate genes related to opioid pharmacology: ABCB1, OPRM1, UGT2B7, CYP3A5, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, COMT, KCNJ6 and SCN9A in 274 deceased patients with OA (DOA), 309 living patients with OA (LOA) and in 394 healthy volunteers (HV). The main hypothesis of the study was that subjects homozygous for the variant 3435T in ABCB1 (rs1045642) occur more frequently in DOA than in LOA and HV because morphine and methadone more readily cross the blood barrier in these subjects due to a lower efflux transporter activity of the ABCB1 (p-glycoprotein) transporter. Our results did not support this hypothesis, because no statistically significant difference (p = 0.506) in the frequency of the TT genotype of rs1045642 was observed between the DOA, LOA and HV cohorts. However, for another ABCB1 variant, rs9282564, we found that the frequencies of the AG and TT genotypes were 13, 21 and 25% in DOA, LOA and HV, respectively, and after correcting for age, sex and multiple testing, the differences between DOA and LOA were statistically significantly different (p = 0.027). The COMT rs4680 AA genotype frequencies were 25%, 35% and 31% in DOA, LOA and HV, respectively, and the difference between DOA and LOA was also statistically significant (p = 0.0028). In conclusion, this study generated two hypotheses suggesting possible associations of a reduced risk of death and carrying, respectively, the ABCB1 rs9282564 AG and TT genotypes and the COMT rs4680 AA genotype among patients with OA. These findings should be confirmed in independent cohorts, and if a causal relationship between these variants and fatal poisoning in OA is confirmed, then it may be possible at least in theory to personalize prevention of sudden death in this patient group.
PubMed ID
27061230 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Addiction treatment center at Ulleråker hospital 3. Follow-up supervision of amphetamine addicts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110171
Source
Lakartidningen. 1969 Mar 26;66(13):1331-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-1969

Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106722
Source
Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2013 Nov-Dec;38(6):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pia Jæger
Dusanka Zaric
Jonna S Fomsgaard
Karen Lisa Hilsted
Jens Bjerregaard
Jens Gyrn
Ole Mathiesen
Tommy K Larsen
Jørgen B Dahl
Author Affiliation
From the *Department of Anaesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopaedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; †Department of Anaesthesia, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg; ‡Department of Anaesthesia, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup; §Section of Acute Pain Management, Department of Anaesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopaedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; and ?Department of Surgery, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2013 Nov-Dec;38(6):526-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amides - administration & dosage
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Anesthesia, Spinal
Anesthetics, Local - administration & dosage
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Femoral Nerve
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral
Male
Middle Aged
Morphine - therapeutic use
Muscle strength
Muscle Weakness - etiology - physiopathology
Nerve Block - adverse effects - methods
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Quadriceps Muscle - innervation
Recovery of Function
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Femoral nerve block (FNB), a commonly used postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), reduces quadriceps muscle strength essential for mobilization. In contrast, adductor canal block (ACB) is predominately a sensory nerve block. We hypothesized that ACB preserves quadriceps muscle strength as compared with FNB (primary end point) in patients after TKA. Secondary end points were effects on morphine consumption, pain, adductor muscle strength, morphine-related complications, and mobilization ability.
We performed a double-blind, randomized, controlled study of patients scheduled for TKA with spinal anesthesia. The patients were randomized to receive either a continuous ACB or an FNB via a catheter (30-mL 0.5% ropivacaine given initially, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine, 8 mL/h for 24 hours). Muscle strength was assessed with a handheld dynamometer, and we used the percentile change from baseline for comparisons. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT01470391).
We enrolled 54 patients, of which 48 were analyzed. Quadriceps strength as a percentage of baseline was significantly higher in the ACB group compared with the FNB group: (median [range]) 52% [31-71] versus 18% [4-48], (95% confidence interval, 8-41; P = 0.004). There was no difference between the groups regarding morphine consumption (P = 0.94), pain at rest (P = 0.21), pain during flexion of the knee (P = 0.16), or adductor muscle strength (P = 0.39); neither was there a difference in morphine-related adverse effects or mobilization ability (P > 0.05).
Adductor canal block preserved quadriceps muscle strength better than FNB, without a significant difference in postoperative pain.
Notes
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):253-424747312
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):263-424747322
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):254-524747313
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):26424747323
PubMed ID
24121608 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of extradural and intrathecal opiates: report of a nationwide survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46784
Source
Br J Anaesth. 1982 May;54(5):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1982
Author
L L Gustafsson
B. Schildt
K. Jacobsen
Source
Br J Anaesth. 1982 May;54(5):479-86
Date
May-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Epidural Space
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral
Injections
Injections, Spinal
Middle Aged
Morphine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Narcotics - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Insufficiency - chemically induced
Sweden
Abstract
The Swedish Society of Anaesthetists conducted a nationwide retrospective survey of clinical experience with extradural and intrathecal opiates. Special interest was focused on the frequency and type of ventilatory depression. The questionnaire was answered by 84 of 93 departments (90%). Up to May 1981 extradural morphine had been given to approximately 6000-9150 patients, extradural pethidine to 220-450 and intrathecal morphine to 90-150 patients. Ventilatory depression requiring treatment with naloxone was reported in 23 patients treated with extradural morphine (0.25-0.40%) and in six given intrathecal morphine (4-7%). In 22 patients the administration of extradural morphine was considered as a major contributory factor for the occurrence of ventilatory depression. Only two of these 22 patients experienced ventilatory depression later than 6 h after the last dose of opiates (S.C., i.m., i.v. or extradural). Patients aged 70 yr or more, those receiving thoracic extradural puncture and those with reduced ventilatory capacity seemed to be overrepresented.
PubMed ID
6896150 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related morphine kinetics in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59555
Source
Dev Pharmacol Ther. 1993;20(1-2):26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M L Pokela
K T Olkkola
T. Seppälä
M. Koivisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Dev Pharmacol Ther. 1993;20(1-2):26-34
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - blood
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn - blood - growth & development
Injections, Intravenous
Morphine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Abstract
The pharmacokinetics of morphine was studied in 27 infants receiving a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg morphine after surgery (n = 23) or during mechanical ventilation (n = 4). The pharmacokinetics of morphine varied greatly between the subjects, especially in the neonates. The clearance and half-life varied distinctly with postnatal age. The mean (+/- SD) half-life was 8.1 +/- 8.1 h in 10 neonates younger than 1 week, 5.4 +/- 3.4 h in 10 infants aged from 1 week to 2 months and 2.6 +/- 1.7 h in 7 infants aged from 2 to 6 months. Mean clearance increased significantly with age, being 8.7 +/- 5.8 ml/min/kg in the youngest age group, 11.9 +/- 5.1 ml/min/kg in those aged 1 week to 2 months and 28.0 +/- 8.9 ml/min/kg in those aged 2-6 months, and was also significantly lower in the critically ill infants. The clearance and half-life of morphine begin to approach adult values after the age of 1 month, but great individual variability exists even after that. In order to reduce the risk of overdosing or underdosing, the dose of morphine should be titrated individually.
PubMed ID
7924762 View in PubMed
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An active supply of analgesics during pulmonary vein isolation reduces pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256934
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2014 Feb;48(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Carina Carnlöf
Per Insulander
Mats Jensen-Urstad
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet at Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital , Stockholm , Sweden.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2014 Feb;48(1):35-40
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alfentanil - administration & dosage
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - surgery
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects
Conscious Sedation
Diazepam - administration & dosage
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Morphine - administration & dosage
Pain Measurement
Pain Perception
Pain threshold
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Premedication
Pulmonary Veins - surgery
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is an established method for treatment of drug refractory atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a more active regular supply of analgesic and sedative drugs reduces pain and discomfort. We also wanted to evaluate gender differences in pain perception and to compare standard radiofrequency (RF) with cryo balloon ablation (Cryo) from this perspective.
A total of 80 patients, 40 men, median age 58 (range 23-76) years, who underwent PVI under conscious sedation were studied. They were randomized to either standard treatment with morphine and diazepam (control group, C) or to a more active analgesic strategy (A) with pre-medication with oral midazolam mixture and intravenous alfentanil and midazolam regularly administrated during the procedure. Forty patients were treated with RF and 40 with Cryo.
The majority of the patients experienced pain during the procedure. The maximal pain assessed with numerical rating scale (NRS), was lower in the active group compared with that in controls (p = 0.02). Women experienced more pain than men (p = 0.01). RF was more painful than Cryo (p
PubMed ID
24266552 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Analgesic Effect of Obturator Nerve Block Added to a Femoral Triangle Block After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281001
Source
Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2016 Jul-Aug;41(4):445-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Charlotte Runge
Jens Børglum
Jan Mick Jensen
Tina Kobborg
Anette Pedersen
Jon Sandberg
Lone Ramer Mikkelsen
Morten Vase
Thomas Fichtner Bendtsen
Source
Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2016 Jul-Aug;41(4):445-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intravenous
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects
Biomechanical Phenomena
Denmark
Female
Femoral Nerve - diagnostic imaging
Humans
Knee Joint - innervation - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Morphine - administration & dosage
Nerve Block - adverse effects - methods
Obturator Nerve - diagnostic imaging
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting - etiology - prevention & control
Recovery of Function
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Interventional
Abstract
Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with severe pain, and effective analgesia is essential for the quality of postoperative care and ambulation. The analgesic effects of adding an obturator nerve block (ONB) to a femoral triangle block (FTB) after TKA have not been tested previously. We hypothesized that combined ONB and FTB will reduce opioid consumption and pain compared with those of a single FTB or local infiltration analgesia (LIA).
Seventy-eight patients were randomized to combined ONB and FTB, single FTB, or LIA after primary unilateral TKA. The primary outcome was morphine consumption during the first 24 postoperative hours. Secondary outcomes included morphine consumption during the first 48 postoperative hours, pain at rest and passive knee flexion, nausea and vomiting, cumulated ambulation score, and Timed Up and Go test.
Seventy-five patients were included in the analysis. The total intravenous morphine consumption during the first 24 postoperative hours was 2 mg (interquartile range [IQR], 0-15) in the combined ONB and FTB group, 20 mg (IQR, 10-26) in the FTB group (P = 0.0007), and 17 mg (IQR, 10-36) in the LIA group (P = 0.002). The combined ONB and FTB group displayed reduced pain, nausea, and vomiting compared with the other groups. The ambulation tests showed no statistically significant differences between the groups.
Addition of ONB to FTB significantly reduced opioid consumption and pain after TKA compared with a single FTB or LIA, without impaired ambulation.
PubMed ID
27171822 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anti-alcoholic and anti-narcotic action of Methylobacteriim extorquens UCM B-3368]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98706
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2009 Jul-Aug;71(4):34-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
T P Kryshtab
V O Romanovs'ka
N A Stohnii
T V Kovtun
D S Lebediev
H M Tyshchenko
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 2009 Jul-Aug;71(4):34-41
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Alcohol-Related Disorders - enzymology - metabolism - prevention & control
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Amino Acids - isolation & purification
Animals
Biomass
Cholinesterases - metabolism
Dietary Supplements - microbiology
Disease Models, Animal
Male
Malondialdehyde - metabolism
Methylobacterium extorquens - chemistry - growth & development
Morphine Dependence - enzymology - metabolism - prevention & control
Rats
Abstract
The paper deals with action efficiency of microbial biomass on characteristic indicators at alcohol and morphine organism intoxication. The investigated microbial biomass affects the regulatory biochemical and physiological systems in experimental animals, normalizes activity of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehide dehydrogenase, as well as the content of dophamine, disturbed under the effect of alcohol and morphine. Thus, the organism intoxication decreases. Except for the specific action, the above microbial biomass can be a source of protein, aminoacids, vitamins, microelements. So, the microbial preparation, made on its basis, can be used for the treatment of alcohol and morphine dependence in a form of biologically active dope. Thus the microbial drug intended for treatment of alcohol and opium dependence has been developed. One of its action mechanisms is based on the microorganisms capacity to transform alcohols and aldehides, owing to availability of alcohol and aldehide dehydrogenase, other its action mechanisms are at the stage of investigation.
PubMed ID
19938614 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A pioneer group of morphine addicts 7 years later].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245606
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jul 9;77(28-29):2530-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-9-1980

169 records – page 1 of 17.