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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Acute cholecystitis and cholangitis caused by Echinococcus granulosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212287
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 1996 Apr;91(4):805-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
S. Abou-Khalil
B M Smith
J D MacLean
D. Poenaru
G M Fried
P. Bret
A N Barkun
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 1996 Apr;91(4):805-7
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cholangitis - parasitology
Cholecystitis - parasitology
Cholestasis, Extrahepatic - parasitology
Cystic Duct
Diagnosis, Differential
Echinococcosis, Hepatic - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morocco - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology
Rupture, Spontaneous
Abstract
We report for the first time in the recent North American literature, the case of a patient with rupture of a hepatic hydatid cyst into the gallbladder, with subsequent obstruction of the cystic duct by a daughter cyst acting as a ball-valve and causing acute acalculous cholecystitis.
PubMed ID
8677959 View in PubMed
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Birth defects and parental consanguinity in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34355
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Mar 1;145(5):439-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1997
Author
C. Stoltenberg
P. Magnus
R T Lie
A K Daltveit
L M Irgens
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Mar 1;145(5):439-48
Date
Mar-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - ethnology
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Consanguinity
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Age
Morocco - ethnology
Norway - epidemiology
Pakistan - ethnology
Parity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
The study compares frequencies of birth defects between immigrant groups and the rest of the Norwegian population in Norway and estimates the influence of consanguinity and socioeconomic factors on these frequencies. The authors studied all 1.56 million births in Norway from 1967 to 1993. Of these, 7,494 children had two Pakistani parents, 84,688 had one Norwegian and one immigrant parent, and 25,891 had two immigrant parents from countries other than Pakistan. The risk of birth defects relative to the Norwegian group was 0.98 (95% confidence interval 0.92-1.03) in the group with one foreign and one Norwegian parent, 1.39 (95% confidence interval 1.22-1.60) in the group with two Pakistani parents, and 1.04 (95% confidence interval 0.95-1.14) in the group with two parents from other foreign countries; 0.1% of the Norwegian and 30.1% of the Pakistani children had parents who were first cousins. There was no difference in risk between children of nonconsanguineous Pakistani parents and the other groups. The relative risk of birth defects among children whose parents were first cousins was about 2 in all groups. Among the Pakistani, 28% of all birth defects could be attributed to consanguinity. Low paternal educational level was associated with a slightly increased risk in the Norwegian group, while independent effects of parental educational levels were not found in any other groups.
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Epidemiol 1997 May 15;145(10):957
PubMed ID
9048518 View in PubMed
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[Caries in 2-3 year old children in relation to feeding habits and nationality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36834
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
L A Nielsen
L. Esmark
Author Affiliation
Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Date
Feb-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Infant
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
PubMed ID
1449738 View in PubMed
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Childhood tuberculosis in a developed country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37991
Source
Eur Respir J. 1989 Nov;2(10):985-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
J. Mortensen
P. Lange
H K Storm
K. Viskum
Author Affiliation
Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1989 Nov;2(10):985-7
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Incidence
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Philippines - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
From 1975 to 1985, 25 Danish children (aged less than 15 yrs) and 40 children of immigrants were notified for tuberculosis in Copenhagen for the first time. A follow-up was undertaken in 1987. The annual rate of tuberculosis per 100,000 among the Danish children was 5 and among immigrant children 68-200 depending on the nationality. At the time of diagnosis, no significant differences were present between Danes and immigrants as regards age, sex, occurrence of symptoms or previous BCG immunization, whereas there were significantly more bacteriologically proven cases among the immigrants. All Danish children had respiratory tuberculosis only, whereas 13 immigrant children had extrapulmonary manifestations including one case of miliary and two cases of meningeal tuberculosis. At follow-up, all patients were cured for tuberculosis and had experienced a normal physical development.
PubMed ID
2606201 View in PubMed
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Detection of a highly toxic clone of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (JP2) in a Moroccan immigrant family with multiple cases of localized aggressive periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30591
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2004 Jan;14(1):41-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
D. Haubek
J. Westergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Oral Health and Pediatric Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark. dhaubek@odont.au.dk
Source
Int J Paediatr Dent. 2004 Jan;14(1):41-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacillus Infections - microbiology
Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans - classification - genetics
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Base Sequence - genetics
Child
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Dental Plaque - microbiology
Emigration and Immigration
Exotoxins - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingivitis - microbiology
Humans
Male
Morocco - ethnology
Operon - genetics
Periodontitis - microbiology
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Sequence Deletion - genetics
Abstract
The JP2 clone of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a high-leukotoxin-producing strain, characterized by a 530-basepair (bp) deletion in the promoter region of the leukotoxin gene operon and mainly found among individuals with African origin, is associated with localized aggressive periodontitis. The objective of the study was to examine the occurrence of periodontal disease in a Moroccan immigrant family living in Denmark in which the oldest son (14 year) was referred and treated for localized aggressive periodontitis. Further, the potential occurrence of the JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans in the family was examined. Here we present the clinical, radiographic, and microbiological findings from the family. Clinical and radiographic examination of the other family members revealed that 3 of 5 younger siblings had localized aggressive periodontitis, one had gingivitis and the mother had chronic periodontitis. Despite scaling followed by intensive maintenance therapy several family members, including the sibling with gingivitis, had further attachment loss at the 1-year examination. The JP2 clone of A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated from subgingival plaque samples from 4 children with periodontitis. In contrast, it was not detected in plaque from the oldest boy, who had been treated for localized aggressive periodontitis by surgery combined with antibiotic therapy. The 4 children with periodontitis and colonized with the JP2 clone were treated by scaling and antibiotic administration. One month later the JP2 clone could still be detected in plaque samples. In conclusion, it is confirmed that members of immigrant families with African origin are potential carriers of the JP2 clone and that those families often have multiple family members with localized aggressive periodontitis. It is proposed that those families are given periodontal examination frequently to benefit from early diagnosis and treatment of the disease.
PubMed ID
14706027 View in PubMed
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Preconception Folic Acid Supplement Use in Immigrant Women (1999-2016).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308806
Source
Nutrients. 2019 Sep 27; 11(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-27-2019
Author
Roy M Nilsen
Anne K Daltveit
Marjolein M Iversen
Marit G Sandberg
Erica Schytt
Rhonda Small
Ragnhild B Strandberg
Eline S Vik
Vigdis Aasheim
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Inndalsveien, 28, 5063 Bergen, Norway. roy.miodini.nilsen@hvl.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2019 Sep 27; 11(10):
Date
Sep-27-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Africa, Eastern - ethnology
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements - statistics & numerical data
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Folic Acid - therapeutic use
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Morocco - ethnology
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Preconception Care - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examines how preconception folic acid supplement use varied in immigrant women compared with non-immigrant women. We analyzed national population-based data from Norway from 1999-2016, including 1,055,886 pregnancies, of which 202,234 and 7,965 were to 1st and 2nd generation immigrant women, respectively. Folic acid supplement use was examined in relation to generational immigrant category, maternal country of birth, and length of residence. Folic acid supplement use was lower overall in 1st and 2nd generation immigrant women (21% and 26%, respectively) compared with Norwegian-born women (29%). The lowest use among 1st generation immigrant women was seen in those from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Morocco, and Somalia (around 10%). The highest use was seen in immigrant women from the United States, the Netherlands, Denmark, and Iceland (>30%). Folic acid supplement use increased with increasing length of residence in immigrant women from most countries, but the overall prevalence was lower compared with Norwegian-born women even after 20 years of residence (adjusted odds ratio: 0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.67). This study suggests that immigrant women from a number of countries are less likely to use preconception folic acid supplements than non-immigrant women, even many years after settlement.
PubMed ID
31569600 View in PubMed
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Quality of life and coping strategies among immigrant women living with pain in Denmark: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271502
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008075
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Camilla Michaëlis
Maria Kristiansen
Marie Norredam
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(7):e008075
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Chronic Pain - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Denmark
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Social Participation
Somalia - ethnology
Abstract
To examine quality of life and coping strategies among immigrant women living with chronic pain.
Qualitative content analysis based on in-depth semistructured interviews.
A clinic specifically targeting immigrants at a larger university hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark.
Non-western female immigrant patients suffering from chronic pain (n=13).
Experiences of the impact of chronic pain on quality of life.
Chronic pain was perceived to have an extensive, adverse effect on all aspects of quality of life, including physical health, mental well-being and social relations. This included the ability to maintain activities of daily living and the ability to work. Chronic pain was further experienced as a cause of emotional distress, depression and altered personalities, which all had great consequences on women's social interactions, causing change and loss of social relations. A variety of coping strategies were used to cope with the pain, manage its consequences, and restore a level of health that would enable women to function and fulfil social roles. Many participants coped with the pain by altering everyday life, keeping daily activities to a minimum and taking pain-killing drugs, offering temporary relief. Seeking healthcare was another coping strategy used as an active means to assert agency and as a temporary distraction from pain. However, accessing healthcare also involved a risk of disagreement and disappointments.
Chronic pain had a severe negative impact on quality of life and necessitated alterations in everyday life and active health-seeking strategies. Implications for practice imply a need for a more holistic approach to immigrant women with chronic pain, including a family-centred approach. Further research is needed to explore similarities or differences in and between populations with diverse ethnic, socioeconomic and psychosocial backgrounds, and to assess how ethnicity and culture might influence the experiences of chronic pain.
Notes
Cites: Pain. 2012 Dec;153(12):2332-822959600
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Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Oct;46(4):546-5523507129
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PubMed ID
26163036 View in PubMed
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Soluble leptin receptor and risk of gestational diabetes in a multiethnic population: A prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283798
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov;101(11):4070-4075
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Sommer
Gulseth
Jenum
Sletner
Thorsby
Birkeland
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Nov;101(11):4070-4075
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - ethnology
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Iraq - ethnology
Leptin - blood
Morocco - ethnology
Norway - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Leptin - blood
Risk
Sri Lanka - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R), a potential marker of leptin resistance, is inversely associated with risk of type 2 diabetes, independently of leptin concentrations. We have previously shown that ethnic difference in leptin concentration may partly explain the increased risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) in South Asians.
Our objective was to investigate whether sOb-R concentrations are associated with risk of GDM, whether concentrations of sOb-R differ across ethnic groups, and whether ethnic differences in sOb-R explain the ethnic differences in GDM risk.
The STORK Groruddalen study; a prospective cohort study of pregnant women living in Oslo, Norway, between May 2008 and May 2010.
Of the total sample (n = 823), 680 (47.1% Europeans) had sOb-R measured in pregnancy week 15 and an oral glucose tolerance test performed in week 28.
GDM was diagnosed according to World Health Organization 2013 criteria.
sOb-R was inversely associated with GDM (odds ratio, 0.76 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.83] per ng/ml increase in sOb-R, P
PubMed ID
27537771 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.