Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion during early phase of acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37907
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1990 Jan-Feb;109(1-2):111-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
H. Karjalainen
M. Koskela
J. Luotonen
E. Herva
P. Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1990 Jan-Feb;109(1-2):111-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - analysis
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology - isolation & purification
Otitis Media with Effusion - immunology - microbiology
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology - isolation & purification
Abstract
Serum type (IgG, IgM and IgA-class) and secretory type antibodies specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 46 serum and 114 middle ear effusion (MEE) samples from 85 children with acute otitis media (AOM). The samples were obtained within 12 h from the onset of the ear symptoms. Serum (but not secretory) type antibodies to the infecting Pn serotype were found in 24% of the MEE samples of the patients with Pn AOM and, correspondingly, serum and/or secretory type antibodies to Hi and Br were seen in 54% and 63% of the MEE samples of the patients with Hi or Br AOM, respectively. Moreover, antibodies against bacteria other than the causative one could also be found in the MEE. The occurrence of the serum type antibodies against these bacteria in the MEE was closely correlated with their serum levels. The findings of this study indicate that during the very early phase of AOM, the MEE contains both serum type antibodies originating from the serum, and secretory antibodies of middle ear origin. Among them there are antibodies specific to the three most common bacteria causing AOM (Pn, Hi, and Br) regardless of the bacterial etiology of the AOM attack in question.
PubMed ID
2106760 View in PubMed
Less detail

Influence of age, gender and smoking on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis antibody titres in an elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52709
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1997;29(5):485-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Kurtti
R. Isoaho
L. von Hertzen
T. Keistinen
S L Kivelä
M. Leinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1997;29(5):485-9
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Smoking
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of serum antibody levels to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis with age, gender and smoking in an elderly population. The study population comprised all the inhabitants aged 65 years or over in a rural municipality in south-western Finland. Serum samples were obtained from 1,174 out of a total of 1,360 subjects. Bacterial antibodies were measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) using pneumolysin and whole bacterial cells of H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis (mixture of 10 different strains for both) as antigens. The main findings were as follows: (i) antibody levels generally decreased with increasing age both in men and in women; (ii) antibody titres against H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were higher in men than in women; and (iii) antibody titres to H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, but not to S. pneumoniae, were significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers. These data suggest that antibody-mediated protection against respiratory pathogens may be impaired in the elderly, leading to a higher susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, that the exposure to H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis may be higher in men than in women, and that smokers have more respiratory infections or colonization due to these 2 bacteria than do non-smokers.
Notes
Erratum In: Scand J Infect Dis 1998;30(1):95
PubMed ID
9435037 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mixed bacterial and viral infections are common in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38028
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Oct;8(10):683-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
J. Hietala
M. Uhari
H. Tuokko
M. Leinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Oulu University, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Oct;8(10):683-6
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bacterial Infections - complications - diagnosis
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Complement Fixation Tests
Female
Haemophilus Infections - complications - diagnosis
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Infant
Latex Fixation Tests
Leukocyte Count
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology
Pneumococcal Infections - complications - diagnosis
Virus Diseases - complications - diagnosis
Abstract
Acute phase and convalescent sera from 51 pediatric patients who had a documented viral infection and no obvious culture-confirmed bacterial infection such as meningitis, otitis media or urinary tract infection were tested by enzyme immunoassay for antibodies to Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis and by the latex agglutination test for pneumococcal antigens to evaluate the frequency of mixed bacterial and viral infections. A mixed bacterial and viral infection was documented in 19 patients (37%). Seven patients (14%) showed a diagnostic rise in antibodies to H. influenzae and 8 patients (16%) showed an antibody elevation to B. catarrhalis in their paired sera; pneumococcal antigen was detected in acute phase serum from 4 patients (8%). The rate of mixed infections in patients having respiratory symptoms was 52%. High serum C-reactive protein values and white blood cell counts were found significantly more often in those with mixed infections than in those who had viral infections. The results indicate that mixed bacterial and viral infections occur more frequently in children than one could anticipate on the basis of the earlier reports. Mixed bacterial and viral etiology is highly probable in a child who has a defined viral infection with high C-reactive protein and white blood cell count values, especially in the presence of respiratory symptoms.
PubMed ID
2510121 View in PubMed
Less detail

Moraxella catarrhalis--an uncommon cause of community-acquired pneumonia in Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35987
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):399-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
B A Claesson
M. Leinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):399-402
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Infant
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology - isolation & purification
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Neisseriaceae Infections - epidemiology
Pneumonia, Bacterial - epidemiology - microbiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In 284 Swedish children with community-acquired, roentgenologically verified pneumonia, antibodies to Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis were determined in paired serum samples with an enzyme immunoassay using a whole-cell antigen preparation from 10 strains of M. catarrhalis. Only 9 children (3%) had significant increases in antibodies to M. catarrhalis. Among these 9 children, 11-39 months of age, 6 had serologic evidence of concurrent infection with other respiratory pathogens such as S. pneumoniae, non-capsulated H. influenza, RS virus and adenovirus. In 6 (67%) of the 9 children with antibody response and in 74 (27%) of the 275 children without antibody response to M. catarrhalis, nasopharyngeal cultures yielded growth of this bacterium. M. catarrhalis seems to be a common commensal in the upper respiratory tract, but a rare cause of pneumonia in children.
PubMed ID
7984970 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occurrences of antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion and serum during the course of acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37335
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1991;111(1):112-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H. Karjalainen
M. Koskela
J. Luotonen
E. Herva
P. Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1991;111(1):112-9
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Haemophilus Infections - immunology
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology
Otitis Media with Effusion - immunology - microbiology
Pneumococcal Infections - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Time Factors
Abstract
The occurrence of IgG, IgM and IgA class antibodies against a type-specific capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn) and against a whole cell antigen of Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) was studied using the ELISA method on middle ear effusion (MEE) samples of 85 patients and paired serum samples of 40 patients during the course of acute otitis media (AOM). Although specific antibodies to all of these three bacteria appeared in MEE during the course of an AOM episode, antibodies against the infecting bacteria of that particular AOM episode were more often prominent. The antibodies were also detectable in the MEE without simultaneous presence in the serum. The middle ear infection was prolonged more often if specific antibodies to the infecting bacterium could not be detected in the MEE obtained at the beginning of the AOM attack. The present study indicates that AOM caused by Pn, Hi or Br may induce both a systemic and a local production of specific antibodies against the causative organisms during the course of otitis media. The occurrence of such antibodies in MEE seems to play a major role in the resolution of AOM.
PubMed ID
1901685 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of repeated Moraxella catarrhalis colonization is increased in children with Toll-like receptor 4 Asp299Gly polymorphism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106590
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Nov;32(11):1185-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Juho Vuononvirta
Ville Peltola
Jussi Mertsola
Qiushui He
Author Affiliation
From the *Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare; †Department of Pediatric, Turku University Hospital; and ‡Turku Institute for Child and Youth Research, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Nov;32(11):1185-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Load
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology - isolation & purification
Moraxellaceae Infections - genetics - immunology - microbiology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Toll-Like Receptor 4 - genetics - immunology
Abstract
Moraxella catarrhalis is a common causative agent of acute otitis media and other respiratory infections in children. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is an important protein of human innate immunity. One polymorphic site Asp299Gly of TLR4 is proven to result in an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria. We investigated whether Finnish children who carry Asp299Gly had increased risk of M. catarrhalis colonization during their first 2 years of life.
This was a prospective cohort study carried out in Turku, Finland. We studied M. catarrhalis colonization in 161 Finnish children, whose nasopharyngeal specimens were taken at 2, 12 and 24 months of age. The semiquantitative culture method was used for identification of different bacterial species and the pyrosequencing-based method for detection of TLR4 Asp299Gly.
Of 161 subjects, 126 (78%) were TLR4 A/A wild type and 35 (22%) were A/G heterozygote variants. The prevalence of M. catarrhalis increased from 24% at 2 months to 48% at 12 months and to 58% at 24 months of age. Of the 35 subjects with TLR4 variant, 15 (43%) were M. catarrhalis positive at all 3 time points, whereas only 11 (9%) subjects with TLR4 wild type were positive at these time points (relative risk 4.91, 95% confidence interval: 2.482-9.711, P=0.0001). Moreover, subjects with TLR4 variant had significantly higher bacterial load of M. catarrhalis in their nasopharynx than those with TLR4 wild type (P=0.0032).
Our results indicate that children with TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism have an increased risk of repeated M. catarrhalis colonization.
PubMed ID
24141797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Secretory antibodies specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Branhamella catarrhalis in middle ear effusion during acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37334
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1991;111(3):524-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H. Karjalainen
M. Koskela
J. Luotonen
P. Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1991;111(3):524-9
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis - secretion
Child
Child, Preschool
Exudates and Transudates - chemistry
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Infant
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - immunology
Otitis Media with Effusion - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Species Specificity
Streptococcus pneumoniae - immunology
Abstract
The occurrence of specific secretory antibodies against the type-specific capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae (Pn) and against the whole cell antigen of Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Branhamella catarrhalis (Br) were measured by the ELISA method in 211 middle ear effusion (MEE) samples of 85 children with acute otitis media (AOM) during the course of the disease. Antibodies against at least one of those bacteria were detected at the initial visit in 33.6% of the ears and later in 20%. All in all, such antibodies could be found in 50% of the ears during the follow-up. Pneumococcal secretory antibodies were found in 5 out of 116 ears only, anti-Hi antibodies in 52 and anti-Br antibodies in 42 ears. The specific secretory antibodies were detected against all these bacteria regardless of the bacterial etiology of the AOM attack in question. The AOM attack was prolonged more often if such antibodies were not found in the MEE sample taken at the initial visit. The appearance of such antibodies during the disease seemed to imply termination of the AOM episode in question. The conclusions of this study are that during an AOM attack a local production of antibodies in middle ear against the three most common bacteria. Pn, Hi and/or Br, causing AOM may be induced. The appearance of such antibodies in MEE seems to be beneficial for the resolution of AOM.
PubMed ID
1909486 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.