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479 records – page 1 of 48.

10 morale boosters for off-shift staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223424
Source
MLO Med Lab Obs. 1992 Aug;24(8):40-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
K V Rondeau
Author Affiliation
School of Health Services Administration, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S.
Source
MLO Med Lab Obs. 1992 Aug;24(8):40-1
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Medical Laboratory Personnel - psychology
Morale
Night Care - manpower
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
PubMed ID
10120562 View in PubMed
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Abortion ethics--women's post abortion assessments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64698
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Jul;73(6):492-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
K. Holmgren
N. Uddenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1994 Jul;73(6):492-6
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Ethics
Female
Guilt
Humans
Interviews
Maternal-Fetal Relations
Moral Development
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Qualitative Research
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shame
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Induced abortion is often discussed in terms of ethics. The aim of the present report is to describe the abortion ethics as it was expressed by women undergoing a legal abortion. OBJECTIVE. Moral considerations expressed during semistructured interviews by 128 women two weeks after a first trimester abortion in Stockholm 1987-90 are reported. RESULT. The women had faced a choice between abortion and parenthood. At the time of the abortion many of them were living under conditions that meant they were unable to offer a child the security they regarded as a child's right. The conflict the women spontaneously described as their main moral dilemma was not a conflict between the woman and the fetus, but a conflict between several close relationships, also concerning the prospective father. The ethics that the women applied to the problems of abortion was founded on a long-term responsibility to care for persons in their relationships. CONCLUSION. The women interviewed had three levels of moral reasoning simultaneously present. 1. A theoretical level--most of all concerning other women--a liberal view of rights: abortion should be a freely obtainable option. 2. A theoretical level--above all, concerning themselves--a restrictive deontological view: the extinction of life is morally wrong and should be avoided. 3. A practical level--when the problem was a reality: a consequentialist ethics of care. According to this ethics of care it was important that the abortion could be performed as early as possible during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
8042463 View in PubMed
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Abortion: the legal right has been won, but not the moral right.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63203
Source
Reprod Health Matters. 2004 Nov;12(24 Suppl):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Mette Løkeland
Author Affiliation
Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. mette.lokeland@helse-bergen.no
Source
Reprod Health Matters. 2004 Nov;12(24 Suppl):167-73
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Adolescent
Adult
Contraception
Female
Humans
Morals
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unwanted
Reproductive Rights
Abstract
In 1978 the abortion law was liberalised in Norway. It permits abortion on request up to 12 weeks of pregnancy, and after that with the agreement of a medical commission, taking the woman's own views into consideration. In 2003, 96% of abortions took place before 12 weeks of pregnancy. There is considerable support among the population for the current law, and the right to abortion does not seem to be under threat, yet opponents of abortion attack the law frequently. Debates on recent biotechnology laws and difficulties introducing the abortion pill, on the spurious grounds that it would make abortion too easy, imply continuing moral qualms about abortion. While abortion among young, unmarried women is more accepted, many married women feel they have to justify their decision. Women are expected to feel sorrow, shame and guilt because of their sexual conduct for many reasons, but especially if the result is an unwanted pregnancy. It is easier to protect the law when there is recognition of the moral right to choose abortion. The legal battle has been won, but winning the moral battle is important in Norway now. I believe that until having an abortion is considered as acceptable morally as using contraception, women will not have gained their full reproductive rights.
PubMed ID
15938170 View in PubMed
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Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
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Accepting the inevitable: A mixed method approach with assessment and perceptions of well-being in very old persons within the northern Sweden Silver-MONICA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304552
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2021 Jan - Feb; 92:104275
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Albin D Almevall
Karin Zingmark
Sofi Nordmark
Ann-Sofie Forslund
Johan Niklasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden; Department of Development, Region Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. Electronic address: albin.dahlin.almevall@ltu.se.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2021 Jan - Feb; 92:104275
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Morale
Perception
Silver
Sweden
Abstract
As the group of very old persons will form an increasing part of society, the study of how well-being is described and affected by specific factors will be of importance to meet the future needs of these persons. The aim of the study was to increase knowledge of well-being in very old persons by combining assessments and perceptions using the Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale (PGCMS).
In a mixed method, convergent parallel design, 52 persons 80 years or older were assessed and interviewed using the PGCMS to combine assessment of morale and descriptions of perceptions of well-being using a mixed method approach.
Quantitative and qualitative results converged in four areas: not feeling lonely and being included, rating and perceiving health as good, high physical function/ability and being physically active, living in own house and feeling at home. Areas perceived as important to well-being captured only in qualitative analysis were having freedom and engagement. An example of insights not achievable from the quantitative or qualitative analysis alone was that individuals with high morale expressed anxiety about losing their health due to potential ageing-related threats and that individuals with low morale struggled with acceptance. Acceptance was the key strategy for handling adverse consequences of ageing in all described areas.
When using standardized assessment scales in clinical practice, it could be useful to combine quantitative and qualitative data. Acceptance was key for well-being; however, acceptance could be resigned or reorienting in nature.
PubMed ID
33032185 View in PubMed
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Access to health care information: legal imperative or moral responsibility?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104003
Source
Health Law Can. 1990;10(3):213-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

Achieving harmony with oneself: life with a chronic illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46998
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Sep;19(3):204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Charlotte Delmar
Trine Bøje
Dorrit Dylmer
Lisbeth Forup
Christina Jakobsen
Majbritt Møller
Hanne Sønder
Birthe D Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Aalborg Hospital, Arhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. cd@aas.nja.dk
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Sep;19(3):204-12
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Colitis, Ulcerative - prevention & control - psychology
Coronary Disease - prevention & control - psychology
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - prevention & control - psychology
Existentialism
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Morale
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This paper presents partial findings of a larger research project focusing on what it means to live with a chronic illness. Getting in harmony with oneself is a movement towards, and a form of, acceptance of the chronic suffering and disease. Some patients achieve this level of acceptance, while for others the obstacles of everyday life make this movement towards acceptance difficult. Achieving harmony with oneself is conditioned by the existence of hope and spirit of life/life courage and by the pressure of doubts on this hope. Doubts can shake this hope so that instead of moving towards acceptance, the patient drifts towards hopelessness and despair. The research design is qualitative and uses a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. A total of 18 patients were interviewed, divided into three groups of six patients diagnosed with 'type I' diabetes, colitis ulcerosa and patients with coronary occlusion in the rehabilitation phase. The goal of the research was to derive patterns/themes common to the three diagnosed groups regarding the patients' view of health and disease in connection with chronic illness and to elucidate the significance of this view for how the patients coped with everyday life. The research method is inspired by Paul Ricoeur.
PubMed ID
16101848 View in PubMed
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Acquired Duties for Ethical Research With American Indian/Alaska Native Populations: An Application of Pierson and Millum's Framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298977
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2018 Nov; 18(11):40-42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Ibrahim Garba
Leila Barraza
Elizabeth Hall-Lipsy
Author Affiliation
a University of Arizona.
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2018 Nov; 18(11):40-42
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Humans
Indians, North American
Morals
Notes
CommentOn: Am J Bioeth. 2018 Nov;18(11):6-17 PMID 30475176
CommentIn: Am J Bioeth. 2019 Jan;19(1):W5-W7 PMID 30676896
PubMed ID
30475179 View in PubMed
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479 records – page 1 of 48.