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466 records – page 1 of 47.

Letter: Unwanted pregnancy and abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252489
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Feb 22;112(4):419-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1975
Source
Can Nurse. 1988 Oct;84(9):56-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
A J Davis
Source
Can Nurse. 1988 Oct;84(9):56-8
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics, Nursing
Humans
Morals
Questionnaires
Religion
PubMed ID
3197038 View in PubMed
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Access to health care information: legal imperative or moral responsibility?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104003
Source
Health Law Can. 1990;10(3):213-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

Ethical principles for the conduct of research in the North

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293565
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies
Date
1998
Language
English
French
Inuktitut
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Research - Moral and ethical aspects
Arctic regions - research
Notes
G615.A87 1998 ALASKA
Online Resources
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Residents' attitudes to training in ethics in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215154
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 1995 May;85(5 part 1):783-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995

Ethical and legal reflections on euthanasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207924
Source
Health Law Can. 1997 Aug;18(1):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
D N Weisstub
Author Affiliation
Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal.
Source
Health Law Can. 1997 Aug;18(1):15-22
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Morals
Netherlands
PubMed ID
10178190 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1993 Oct 1;149(7):926
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-1993
Author
S M Alibhai
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Oct 1;149(7):926
Date
Oct-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics Committees
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia
Humans
Morals
Physicians
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Jun 4;326(23):1560-41285741
Cites: CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1293-78462050
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 May 1;148(9):1463-67682892
Comment On: CMAJ. 1993 Apr 15;148(8):1293-78462050
PubMed ID
8117351 View in PubMed
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Continuity in social policy behaviours: the case of voluntary blood donorship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245167
Source
J Soc Policy. 1981 Jan;10(1):53-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1981
Author
E S Lightman
Source
J Soc Policy. 1981 Jan;10(1):53-79
Date
Jan-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Donors - psychology
Humans
Morals
Ontario
Questionnaires
Social Behavior
Abstract
Using voluntary blood donation as a case example, the study on which this article is based explored not only the extent, or breadth, of community involvement in social policy behaviours, but also the continuity, or depth, of this commitment. Demographic and motivational data were collected through a postal questionnaire returned by 1,784 persons who had voluntary donated blood at least once in metropolitan Toronto between 1974 and 1978. An empirical distinction was also drawn between the 'active' and the 'lapsed' donor. The study found that while certain sectors of society were probably disproportionately represented among those who close to undertake voluntary social behaviours, the continuity of these actions could not be statistically associated with demographic or socio-economic variables. However, it did find that donors initially motivated by 'external' considerations such as convenience of location were more likely to lapse, while those for whom moral considerations and a sense of community were most important were more likely to continue as active donors. The general conclusion suggests that manipulating the context may be useful to broaden the initial participatory base in voluntary actions, but to produce continuity in this involvement the challenge must be phrased in moral language.
PubMed ID
10250264 View in PubMed
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Human attribute concepts: relative ubiquity across twelve mutually isolated languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260810
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Jul;107(1):199-216
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Gerard Saucier
Amber Gayle Thalmayer
Tarik S Bel-Bahar
Source
J Pers Soc Psychol. 2014 Jul;107(1):199-216
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Concept Formation
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Humans
Language
Morals
Personality
Abstract
It has been unclear which human-attribute concepts are most universal across languages. To identify common-denominator concepts, we used dictionaries for 12 mutually isolated languages-Maasai, Supyire Senoufo, Khoekhoe, Afar, Mara Chin, Hmong, Wik-Mungkan, Enga, Fijian, Inuktitut, Hopi, and Kuna-representing diverse cultural characteristics and language families, from multiple continents. A composite list of every person-descriptive term in each lexicon was closely examined to determine the content (in terms of English translation) most ubiquitous across languages. Study 1 identified 28 single-word concepts used to describe persons in all 12 languages, as well as 41 additional terms found in 11 of 12. Results indicated that attribute concepts related to morality and competence appear to be as cross-culturally ubiquitous as basic-emotion concepts. Formulations of universal-attribute concepts from Osgood and Wierzbicka were well-supported. Study 2 compared lexically based personality models on the relative ubiquity of key associated terms, finding that 1- and 2-dimensional models draw on markedly more ubiquitous terms than do 5- or 6-factor models. We suggest that ubiquitous attributes reflect common cultural as well as common biological processes.
PubMed ID
24956320 View in PubMed
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466 records – page 1 of 47.