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An engagement and access model for healthcare delivery to adolescents with mood and anxiety concerns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128740
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;6(1):97-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Erin Ross
Evelyn Vingilis
Elizabeth Osuch
Author Affiliation
FEMAP, London, Canada.
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;6(1):97-105
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Community-Institutional Relations
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Ontario
Program Evaluation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Mood and anxiety disorders typically begin during adolescence or early adulthood. Yet services targeting this population are frequently lacking. This study implemented an outreach, access and assessment programme for youth with these concerns. The data reported constitute an evaluation of this mental healthcare delivery approach.
This evaluation included specification of both programme and implementation theories through causal and programme logic models and formative (process) evaluation. Outreach focused on access points for youth such as schools and family physicians' offices. Concerned youth were encouraged to self-refer. Participants completed a semi-structured clinical interview and symptom and function questionnaire package.
Engagement sessions were conducted and results involved 93 youth. The majority of youth self-referred, a process not possible in traditional physician-referral healthcare systems. Interestingly, almost half had received prior treatment and over half had tried a psychiatric medication. Yet participants had significant symptomatology: 81% reported moderate to severe depressive symptoms; 95% reported high levels of trait-anxiety. Functional impairment was substantial: on average, participants missed 2.6 days of school/work and functioned at reduced levels on 4.2 days in the week prior to assessment. Demographic details are presented.
This study evaluated a mental healthcare delivery system that identified individuals with significant distress and functional impairment from mood/anxiety concerns and previous unsuccessful treatment attempts, verifying that they were in need of mental health services. This approach provides a model for outreach and assessment in this population, where earlier intervention has the potential to prevent chronic mental illness and disability.
PubMed ID
22171651 View in PubMed
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Bright-light exposure combined with physical exercise elevates mood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49796
Source
J Affect Disord. 2002 Nov;72(2):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
S. Leppämäki
T. Partonen
J. Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300, Helsinki, Finland. sami.leppamaki@ktl.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2002 Nov;72(2):139-44
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Circadian Rhythm - physiology
Comparative Study
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Phototherapy - methods
Random Allocation
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Physical exercise alleviates depressive symptoms, as does exposure to bright light, especially in those with seasonal variation. Our objective was to compare the effect of exercise alone or combined with morning bright light on mood and the health-related quality of life in healthy subjects. METHODS: Study subjects were working-age adults, randomized in two groups (n=80): exercise in bright light (group A), or exercise in normal indoor illumination (group B). Intervention lasted for 8 weeks and questionnaire data on mood and the health-related quality of life were collected at study entry, and at weeks 4 and 8. RESULTS: Physical exercise both in normal indoor illumination and in bright light was effective at alleviating depressive symptoms. The exercise was significantly more effective at alleviating so-called atypical depressive symptoms when combined with bright-light exposure. LIMITATIONS: There was no active placebo condition, but a comparative, randomized trial was executed. CONCLUSIONS: Physical exercise in bright light had a positive effect on mood and health-related quality of life in a sample of healthy, working-age people. Further research is needed to explore the mechanisms of the apparent additive effect of exercise and light.
PubMed ID
12200204 View in PubMed
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Evaluating change in symptomatic and functional level of children and youth with emotional disorders: a naturalistic observation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272618
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;24(10):1219-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Toril Sørheim Nilsen
Bjørn-Helge Handegård
Martin Eisemann
Siv Kvernmo
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;24(10):1219-31
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study is to describe the changes in symptomatic and functional impairment for children and youth with emotional disorders treated at child and adolescent mental health outpatient services (CAMHS) in Norway. The study was of naturalistic observational type in which the treatment can be classified as "treatment as usual" (TAU). The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), the Health of the Nation Outcome Scale (HONOSCA) and the Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) were used as measures of change. The information from multiple informants allowed the evaluation of change from different perspectives. The sample consisted of 84 children and youth with emotional disorders treated at two CAMHS in the North of Norway. The SDQ, the HONOSCA and the CGAS were administered at intake (T0), during assessment (T1) and approximately, 6 months after T1 (T2). Change was analysed by means of the Linear Mixed Models procedure. The results show that children and youth with emotional disorders experience a statistically significant improvement per month during outpatient treatment according to nearly all the measures of change. For the clinician rated scores, change rates during active assessment/treatment were larger than during the waitlist period. Evaluating change from the perspective of clinical significance showed that only a small proportion of the subjects had change scores that were statistically reliable and clinically significant. Whether an actual change has occurred is uncertain for the majority of patients.
PubMed ID
25572868 View in PubMed
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Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(23):2600-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Leppämäki Sami
Author Affiliation
Kansanterveyslaitos, mielenterveyden ja alkoholitutkimuksen osasto, Helsinki. sami.leppamaki@fimnet.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(23):2600-5
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Melatonin - metabolism
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Phototherapy - methods
Prognosis
Risk factors
Seasonal Affective Disorder - diagnosis - therapy
Treatment Outcome
PubMed ID
16447627 View in PubMed
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[Specialized outpatient care--effective in affective disorders].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115124
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Feb 27-Mar 12;110(9-10):491-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anna Aberg Wistedt
Lars Häggström
Mikael Landén
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet, institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Solna. anna.aberg.wistedt@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Feb 27-Mar 12;110(9-10):491-2
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - standards
Community Mental Health Centers - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Psychiatry - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
23540033 View in PubMed
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