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[A 7-year experience with goiter surgery in an otorhinolaryngologic department. A retrospective study of the the period 1990-1996]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21042
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 26;161(17):2537-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1999
Author
T R Nielsen
F. Clement
H. Pihl
S. Vadstrup
Author Affiliation
Centralsygehuset Nykøbing F, øre-, naese- og halsafdelingen og medicinsk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Apr 26;161(17):2537-41
Date
Apr-26-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Goiter - pathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - prevention & control
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Thyroid Diseases - pathology - surgery
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Thyroidectomy - adverse effects - methods - standards
Abstract
The aim of this study was quality assurance and to analyse the frequency of complications following thyroid surgery. The most dreaded surgical complications are permanent injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve or persistent hypocalcaemia. Our surgical procedure included the use of the surgical microscope in connection with thyroid grand surgery. Our materiel includes 122 patients who underwent surgery for benign thyroid diseases in our department from 1990-1996. In nearly 50% of all cases a lobectomy was performed, reserving resections and subtotal thyroidectomy to special cases. Resections were primarily done in the beginning of the period. The surgical microscope was used as a standard procedure to identify and expose the recurrent laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands. Primary thyroid grand surgery in benign disease resulted in permanent unilateral laryngeal nerve palsy in one case or in 0.83% of the patients. When calculated as nerves at risk, the complication rate was reduced to 0.67%. In benign completion surgery the complication rate was 0%. No patient developed persistent hypocalcaemia.
PubMed ID
10327876 View in PubMed
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Auditory brainstem implants (ABIs)--20 years of clinical experience in Uppsala, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263235
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2014 Oct;134(10):1052-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Malin Siegbahn
Karin Lundin
Gun-Britt Olsson
Fredrik Stillesjö
Anders Kinnefors
Helge Rask-Andersen
Gunnar Nyberg
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 2014 Oct;134(10):1052-61
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Audiometry - methods
Auditory Brain Stem Implantation - adverse effects - methods
Auditory Brain Stem Implants
Auditory Perception - physiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Neurofibromatosis 2 - pathology - surgery
Neuroma, Acoustic - pathology - surgery
Postoperative Care - methods
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Even though sound perception may be limited after treatment with an auditory brainstem implant (ABI), it provides benefits and should be selectively offered to patients. Importantly the patients must be motivated, given reasonable expectations of outcome and offered long-term rehabilitation with a considerable 'learn to listen' period with the implant device.
To describe the clinical experiences and results of 24 ABI surgeries performed in Uppsala University Hospital between 1993 and 2013.
Most patients (n = 20) suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2); a few patients (n = 4) were paediatric non-NF2 patients. The files were searched for information on the presurgery size of the vestibular schwannoma, whether the patient had undergone gamma knife treatment, the surgical approach, the side effects of the surgery and of the use of the implant, the electrode activation pattern and implant use, and categories of auditory performance (CAP) score.
Our results show that many patients greatly benefited from an ABI, and most of the patients used their implants even though the hearing improvements usually consisted of awareness of surrounding sounds and improved lip-reading. No severe side effects were observed from implant stimulation.
PubMed ID
24881643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Central venous oxygen saturation during cardiopulmonary bypass predicts 3-year survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119862
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Jan;16(1):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Staffan Svenmarker
Sören Häggmark
Margareta Östman
Anders Holmgren
Ulf Näslund
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Heart Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. staffan.svenmarker@vll.se
Source
Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg. 2013 Jan;16(1):21-6
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Cardiopulmonary Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Hemodynamics
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Oxygen - blood
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Survivors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Long-term survival after cardiac surgery is determined by a number of different risk factors. Central venous oxygen saturation (S(v)O(2)) measures the balance between oxygen delivery and demand. S(v)O(2) levels in the intensive care situation are reported to be associated with patient outcome. The present report explores the connection between S(v)O(2) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and survival after cardiac surgery.
Retrospective analysis of one thousand consecutive cardiac surgical patients was undertaken. S(v)O(2) during CPB was monitored online. Registry data combining specific risk factors with S(v)O(2) were selected for Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis to examine the influence on 30-day and 3-year survivals.
Nine-hundred and thirty-two patient records were eligible for analysis. S(v)O(2) below 75% during CPB was associated with significantly shorter 30-day and 3-year survivals. Based on Kaplan-Meier statistics, the survival rate decreased by 3.1% (98.1-95.0), P = 0.011 and 6.1% (92.7-86.6), P = 0.003, respectively. The influence of S(v)O(2) on 3-year survival remained statistically significant after controlling for a series of risk factors in the Cox regression analysis. Patients with S(v)O(2)
Notes
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PubMed ID
23065747 View in PubMed
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[Complex ultrasonic study of parathyroids in diagnostic and surgical treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258800
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(6):13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A F Chernousov
L I Ippolitov
G Kh Musaev
M B Saliba
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(6):13-20
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Female
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Primary - diagnosis - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Moscow
Parathyroid Glands - radionuclide imaging - ultrasonography
Parathyroidectomy - adverse effects - methods
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
Preoperative Care - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - methods
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography - methods
Abstract
Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common disease in Russian Federation, cured by endocrine surgeons. Health status after surgical correction of primary hyperparathyroidism depends on availability of screening hypercalciemia, which is still absent in our country. Another problem is a model of surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism (frozen section, intraoperative monitoring of parathyroid hormone, gamma-detection and so on). Although minimally invasive parathyroidectomy has become the only method of treatment in many countries, it is still crucial to identify and accurately localize parathyroid glands before bilateral neck exploration surgery. The diagnostic efficacy of the various imaging techniques is still the subject of current debate. The usefulness of preoperative parathyroid imaging with both dual scintigraphy-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Tc 99m and high-resolution ultrasonography (US) was studied in 92 patients undergoing operations for primary hyperparathyroidism. The accuracy of "integrated" ultrasonography ("check-up US", "target US" after SPECT) and "intraoperative US") of parathyroid glands was 92.9%, sensitivity - 91% and positive predictive value - 94%. This study supports an algorithm of obtaining "integrated" ultrasonography as the initial and in most cases the only preoperative localization tests for patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.
PubMed ID
25042185 View in PubMed
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Defibrillation testing at the time of ICD insertion: an analysis from the Ontario ICD Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141893
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2010 Dec;21(12):1344-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
J S Healey
D H Birnie
D S Lee
A D Krahn
E. Crystal
C S Simpson
P. Dorian
Z. Chen
D. Cameron
A. Verma
S J Connolly
L J Gula
E. Lockwood
G. Nair
J V Tu
Author Affiliation
Population Health Research Institute and McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. healeyj@hhsc.ca
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2010 Dec;21(12):1344-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Defibrillators, Implantable - standards
Electric Countershock - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods - standards
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Registries - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
increasingly, ICD implantation is performed without defibrillation testing (DT).
To determine the current frequency of DT, the risks associated with DT, and to understand how physicians select patients to have DT.
between January 2007 and July 2008, all patients in Ontario, Canada who received an ICD were enrolled in this prospective registry.
a total of 2,173 patients were included; 58% had new ICD implants for primary prevention, 25% for secondary prevention, and 17% had pulse generator replacement. DT was carried out at the time of ICD implantation or predischarge in 65%, 67%, and 24% of primary, secondary, and replacement cases respectively (P = 20% (OR = 1.3, P = 0.05). A history of atrial fibrillation (OR = 0.58, P = 0.0001) or oral anticoagulant use (OR = 0.75, P = 0.03) was associated with a lower likelihood of having DT. Age, gender, NYHA class, and history of stroke or TIA did not predict DT. Perioperative complications, including death, myocardial infarction, stroke, tamponade, pneumothorax, heart failure, infection, wound hematoma, and lead dislodgement, were similar among patients with (8.7%) and without (8.3%) DT (P = 0.7)
DT is performed in two-thirds of new ICD implants but only one-quarter of ICD replacements. Physicians favored performance of DT in patients who are at lower risk of DT-related complications and in those receiving amiodarone. DT was not associated with an increased risk of perioperative complications.
PubMed ID
20662988 View in PubMed
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Effect of intended intraoperative cholangiography and early detection of bile duct injury on survival after cholecystectomy: population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119931
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e6457
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Björn Törnqvist
Cecilia Strömberg
Gunnar Persson
Magnus Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet and Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. bjorn.tornqvist@karolinska.se
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e6457
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bile Duct Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control
Bile Ducts - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
Cholangiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Cholecystectomy - adverse effects - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Iatrogenic Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Incidence
Intraoperative Care - methods
Intraoperative Complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
Registries
Risk Adjustment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine whether the routine use of intraoperative cholangiography can improve survival from complications related to bile duct injuries.
Population based cohort study.
Prospectively collected data from the Swedish national registry of gallstone surgery and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, GallRiks. Multivariate analysis done by Cox regression.
All cholecystectomies recorded in GallRiks between 1 May 2005 and 31 December 2010.
Evidence of bile duct injury, rate of intended use of intraoperative cholangiography, and rate of survival after cholecytectomy.
During the study, 51,041 cholecystectomies were registered in GallRiks and 747 (1.5%) iatrogenic bile duct injuries identified. Patients with bile duct injuries had an impaired survival compared with those without injury (mortality at one year 3.9% v 1.1%). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that early detection of a bile duct injury, during the primary operation, improved survival. The intention to use intraoperative cholangiography reduced the risk of death after cholecystectomy by 62% (hazard ratio 0.38 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.46)).
The high incidence of bile duct injury recorded is probably from GallRiks' ability to detect the entire range of injury severities, from minor ductal lesions to complete transections of major ducts. Patients with bile duct injury during cholecystectomy had impaired survival, and early detection of the injury improved survival. The intention to perform an intraoperative cholangiography reduced the risk of death after cholecystectomy.
Notes
Cites: Ann Surg. 2001 Oct;234(4):549-58; discussion 558-911573048
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PubMed ID
23060654 View in PubMed
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The effects of on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting on intraoperative graft flow in arterial and venous conduits defined by a flow/pressure ratio.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87226
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008 Mar;135(3):533-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Balacumaraswami Lognathen
Abu-Omar Yasir
Selvanayagam Joseph
Pigott David
Taggart David P
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, United Kingdom.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2008 Mar;135(3):533-9
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anastomosis, Surgical
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - methods - mortality
Coronary Artery Bypass, Off-Pump - methods - mortality
Coronary Circulation - physiology
Coronary Disease - mortality - radiography - surgery
Female
Fluorescence
Graft Rejection
Graft Survival
Great Britain
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Male
Mammary Arteries - physiology - transplantation
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Multivariate Analysis
Pressure
Probability
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow
Radial Artery - physiology - transplantation
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Despite profound differences in the neurohumoral milieu in patients undergoing on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, it is uncertain how this affects graft blood flow. METHODS: We prospectively recorded intraoperative transit-time flow measurements (MediStim BF 2004; MediStim AS, Oslo, Norway) in all internal thoracic artery, radial artery, and long saphenous vein conduits in patients undergoing off-pump and on-pump bypass grafting by a single surgeon. We calculated a flow/pressure ratio as a ratio of mean graft flow to mean arterial pressure for all the conduits just before chest closure. RESULTS: Transit-time flow measurements were recorded in 266 grafts (203 off-pump; 63 on-pump) in 100 patients (80 off-pump; 20 on-pump). Overall, mean graft flow (milliliters per minute) was higher for all grafts in the on-pump group despite a significantly lower mean arterial pressure compared with the off-pump group (P
PubMed ID
18329465 View in PubMed
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Fast-tracking (bypassing the PACU) does not reduce nursing workload after ambulatory surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178310
Source
Br J Anaesth. 2004 Dec;93(6):768-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
D. Song
F. Chung
M. Ronayne
B. Ward
S. Yogendran
C. Sibbick
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital and Nursing Information Systems, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Br J Anaesth. 2004 Dec;93(6):768-74
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - methods
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Clinical Nursing Research
Electroencephalography
Hospital Costs
Humans
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Ontario
Postanesthesia Nursing - economics - organization & administration
Postoperative Care - economics - methods
Recovery Room
Workload
Abstract
Postoperative day-case patients are usually allowed to recover from anaesthesia in a postanaesthesia care unit (PACU) before transfer back to the day surgical unit (DSU). Bypassing the PACU can decrease recovery time after day surgery. Cost savings may result from a reduced nursing workload associated with the decreased recovery time. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of bypassing the PACU on patient recovery time and nursing workload and costs.
Two hundred and seven consenting outpatients undergoing day surgery procedures were enrolled. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with a standardized technique and the electroencephalographic bispectral index was monitored and maintained at 40-60 during anaesthetic maintenance. At the end of surgery, patients were randomly assigned to either a routine or fast-tracking (FT) group. Patients in the FT group were transferred from the operating room to the DSU (i.e. bypassing the PACU) if they achieved the FT criteria. All other patients were transferred to the PACU and then to the DSU. Nursing workload was evaluated using a patient care hour chart based on the type and frequency of nursing interventions in the PACU and DSU. A cost associated with the nursing workload was calculated.
The overall time from end of anaesthesia to discharge home was significantly decreased in the fast-tracking group. However, overall patient care hours and costs were similar in the two recovery groups.
Bypassing the PACU after these short outpatient procedures significantly decreases recovery time without compromising patient satisfaction. However, the overall nursing workload and the associated cost were not significantly affected.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Anaesth. 2004 Dec;93(6):756-815533955
PubMed ID
15377581 View in PubMed
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Glucose as a marker of fluid absorption in bipolar transurethral surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147298
Source
Anesth Analg. 2009 Dec;109(6):1850-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
David Piros
Tim Fagerström
Justin W Collins
Robert G Hahn
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Karolinska Institutet at Söder Hospital, S-118 83 Stockholm, Sweden. david.piros@sodersjukhuset.se
Source
Anesth Analg. 2009 Dec;109(6):1850-5
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorption
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Computer simulation
Down-Regulation
England
Glucose - administration & dosage - diagnostic use - pharmacokinetics
Glycine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Isotonic Solutions - administration & dosage - adverse effects - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Sodium - blood
Sweden
Therapeutic Irrigation
Transurethral Resection of Prostate - adverse effects - methods
Up-Regulation
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Water-Electrolyte Imbalance - blood - diagnosis - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Historically, a reduced serum sodium concentration has been used to diagnose absorption of electrolyte-free irrigating fluid during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). In bipolar TURP, the irrigating solution contains electrolytes, thus invalidating the serum sodium method. In this study, we investigated whether glucose can be used to diagnose the absorption of irrigating fluid during TURP procedures.
The serum glucose and sodium concentrations were measured in 250 patients undergoing monopolar TURP using either 1.5% glycine or 5% glucose for urinary bladder irrigation. The glucose kinetics was analyzed in 10 volunteers receiving a 30-min infusion of 20 mL/kg of acetated Ringer's solution with 1% glucose. These data were then used in computer simulations of different absorption patterns that were summarized in a nomogram for the relationship between the glucose level and administered fluid volume.
There was a statistically significant inverse linear relationship between the decrease in serum sodium and the increase in glucose levels after absorption of 5% glucose during TURP (r(2) = 0.80). The glucose concentration increased, from 4.6 (sd 0.4) to 8.3 (0.9) mmol/L, during the experimental infusions. Regardless of the absorption pattern, all simulations indicated that the uptake of 1 L of fluid containing 1% glucose corresponded to an increase in the glucose level of 3.7 (sd 1.6) mmol/L at the end of surgery, whereas 2 L yielded an increase of 6.9 (1.7) mmol/L.
In bipolar TURP, the addition of glucose to a concentration of 1% in the electrolyte-containing irrigation fluid can be used as a tracer of absorption that is comparable with measuring serum sodium after monopolar TURP.
PubMed ID
19923514 View in PubMed
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[High-tech medical care in surgical endocrinology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258757
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(7):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
I A Chekmazov
A A Znamenskii
E D Osminskaia
A N Medvedev
T I Shpazhnikova
V V Kvashnin
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(7):55-9
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Technology - methods - standards
Endocrine System Diseases - classification - diagnosis - surgery
Humans
Monitoring, Intraoperative - methods - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality Improvement
Russia
Technology Assessment, Biomedical - statistics & numerical data
Video-Assisted Surgery - methods - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
The number of patients with endocrine system diseases increases annually. Widespread introduction of screening programs and improvement of laboratory and instrumental diagnostic is one of the most important causes for this. Treatment of patients with endocrine system diseases within the high-tech medical care leads to perform the unique surgical interventions. It increases survival and patients' life quality.
PubMed ID
25146543 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.