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Activated dormant Cryptococcus gattii infection in a Dutch tourist who visited Vancouver Island (Canada): a molecular epidemiological approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148003
Source
Med Mycol. 2010 May;48(3):528-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ferry Hagen
Sander van Assen
Gert Jan Luijckx
Teun Boekhout
Greetje A Kampinga
Author Affiliation
CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Yeast and Basidiomycete Research, Uppsalalaan 8, Utrecht, The Netherlands. f.hagen@cbs.knaw.nl
Source
Med Mycol. 2010 May;48(3):528-31
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cryptococcosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Cryptococcus gattii - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA Fingerprinting
DNA, Fungal - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Genotype
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Mycological Typing Techniques
Netherlands
Travel
Abstract
An ongoing outbreak of Cryptococcus gattii-caused infections, which emerged on Vancouver Island and the Pacific Northwest, has affected more than 200 of the islands' residents, of whom eight died. While C. gattii infections are rarely described in travelers, we report a case of cryptococcosis caused by C. gattii in a patient treated with high dose corticosteroids for systemic lupus erythematosus induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She acquired the disease during a visit to Vancouver Island one year before the onset of the symptoms. This indicates that C. gattii may cause a dormant infection that can be activated during treatment with corticosteroids.
PubMed ID
19824880 View in PubMed
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Adapting spa typing for national laboratory-based surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137554
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Jun;30(6):789-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
A. Vainio
S. Koskela
A. Virolainen
J. Vuopio
S. Salmenlinna
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), PO Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. anni.vainio@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 Jun;30(6):789-97
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteremia - microbiology
Bacterial Typing Techniques - economics - methods
Cluster analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Finland
Genotype
Humans
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Molecular Typing - economics - methods
Staphylococcal Infections - microbiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Laboratory-based surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) monitors the baseline occurrence of different genotypes and identifies strains and transmission chains responsible for outbreaks. The consequences of substituting pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with spa typing as a first-line typing method were analyzed by typing 589 strains isolated between 1997 and 2006, with a focus on both short- and long-term correspondence between the PFGE and spa typing results. The study, covering these ten years, included all Finnish MRSA blood isolates and representatives of the two most prevalent MRSA strains (PFGE types FIN-4 and FIN-16) in Finland. In addition, all sporadic isolates from 2006 were included. spa typing was more expensive but approximately four times faster to perform than PFGE. Nearly 90% of FIN-4 and FIN-16 isolates showed consistent spa types, t172 and t067, respectively. spa typing predicted the PFGE result of the blood isolates by a Wallace coefficient of 0.9009, recognized internationally successful strains (t041, t067) to be common also in Finland, and identified a separate cluster of isolates, also related in time and place among the FIN-4 strains. Additional typing by another method was needed to provide adequate discrimination or to characterize isolates with a newly recognized spa type in Finland.
PubMed ID
21271269 View in PubMed
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Adult cystic fibrosis exacerbations and new strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182440
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Apr 1;169(7):811-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2004
Author
Shawn D Aaron
Karam Ramotar
Wendy Ferris
Katherine Vandemheen
Raphael Saginur
Elizabeth Tullis
David Haase
Dan Kottachchi
Melissa St Denis
Francis Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Peditrics Univeristy of Ottawa; Otawa, Ontario, Canada. saaron@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Apr 1;169(7):811-5
Date
Apr-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cystic Fibrosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Prospective Studies
Pseudomonas Infections - microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
We hypothesized that in adults with cystic fibrosis, the acquisition of a new strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be associated with a pulmonary exacerbation. Eighty-four patients who were chronically infected with P. aeruginosa were prospectively followed from eight centers over a 26-month period. Patients had sputum cultures performed every 3 months while clinically stable and at the time of an exacerbation. Forty patients (48%) had an exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics during the study period, and in 36 of these patients, their P. aeruginosa isolates were genetically typeable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. In 34 of the 36 patients (94%), P. aeruginosa recovered during clinical stability and at exacerbation were of the same genotype. In only two patients (6%; 95% confidence interval, 0-18%) was a new P. aeruginosa clone cultured during an exacerbation that had not been cultured during clinical stability. There were no significant differences in antibiotic susceptibilities, measured as mean minimal inhibitory concentrations, for isolates retrieved during clinically stable periods compared with isolates retrieved during exacerbations. We conclude that for the majority of adult patients with cystic fibrosis a new pulmonary exacerbation is not caused by the acquisition of a new strain of P. aeruginosa.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Apr 1;169(7):781-215044219
PubMed ID
14670805 View in PubMed
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[A genetic epidemiological study of arterial hypertension in an isolated mountain area of Dagestan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213134
Source
Ter Arkh. 1996;68(12):64-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
G G Guseinov
I A Shamov
K B Bulaeva
Source
Ter Arkh. 1996;68(12):64-6
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Altitude
Consanguinity
Dagestan - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology - genetics
Incidence
Male
Molecular Epidemiology
Phenotype
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Hereditary factors of arterial hypertension were evaluated genetically and epidemiologically in the study of an isolated population of Dagestan with high inbreeding. High prevalence of arterial hypertension was found. Its highest morbidity was found in native population of Tukhums characterized also by the highest inbreeding.
PubMed ID
9054045 View in PubMed
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Amplification by long RT-PCR of near full-length norovirus genomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158184
Source
J Virol Methods. 2008 May;149(2):226-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jennifer Kostela
Melissa Ayers
John Nishikawa
Lorraine McIntyre
Martin Petric
Raymond Tellier
Author Affiliation
Metabolism Research Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Virol Methods. 2008 May;149(2):226-30
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - virology
Canada
Feces - virology
Genome, Viral
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Molecular Sequence Data
Norovirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Phylogeny
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sequence Alignment
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
A long RT-PCR method was developed to amplify the norovirus genome. Starting from RNA extracted directly from clinical samples and using broadly reactive primers, it can generate near full-length amplicons that allow for easy determination of the near complete genomic sequence. Two norovirus isolates from Toronto, Canada, in 2002 and 2005 were sequenced. This approach will facilitate molecular epidemiology studies of noroviruses.
PubMed ID
18355931 View in PubMed
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Analysis of echovirus 30 isolates from Russia and new independent states revealing frequent recombination and reemergence of ancient lineages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159831
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Feb;46(2):665-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Alexander N Lukashev
Olga E Ivanova
Tatiana P Eremeeva
Larisa V Gmyl
Author Affiliation
Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitides RAMS, Moscow, Russia. Alexander_lukashev@hotmail.com
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2008 Feb;46(2):665-70
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Enterovirus B, Human - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Enterovirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Evolution, Molecular
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Recombination, Genetic
Russia - epidemiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology
Viral Proteins - genetics
Abstract
We studied two genome regions, VP1 and 3D, of 48 echovirus 30 (E30) isolates from Russia and the new independent states. In VP1, most isolates were similar to European strains reported earlier, and frequent change of circulating subgroups was noticed. We also observed, in 2003-2006, the reemergence of a group of E30 strains with a VP1 region very distant from most modern E30 strains and remotely similar to E30 isolates from the 1960s and the 1970s. A study of the 3D genome region detected multiple recombination events among the studied strains. Recombination presumably occurred every few years, and therefore, the study of a single VP1 genome region cannot accurately describe the phylogenetic history of the virus or predict pathogenetic properties of an isolate. In general, a comparison of the VP1 and 3D genome region phylogenies revealed, in some instances, virtually independent circulation of enterovirus genome fragments on a scale of years.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18077646 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of genomes of two rubella virus strains from the 2004-2005 outbreaks in West Siberia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163561
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2007 Mar-Apr;52(2):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L N Iashina
G I Tiunnikov
I D Petrova
S V Seregin
S S Seregin
V A Ternovoi
E M Malkova
E N Ustinova
S V Netesov
I G Drozdov
V S Petrov
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2007 Mar-Apr;52(2):16-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Outbreaks
Genome, Viral
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Rubella - epidemiology
Rubella virus - genetics
Siberia - epidemiology
Species Specificity
Viral Envelope Proteins - genetics
Abstract
Two outbreaks of rubella infections notified in the Tomsk and Kemerovo Regions were investigated. Two rubella virus strains from one patient in each outbreak were isolated and genetically characterized. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to reveal partial E1 gene sequence at a length of 915 nucleotides. Analysis indicated that the rubella virus strains circulating in the West-Siberian region belonged to international genetic 1g group, which had been first detected in Russia.
PubMed ID
17500233 View in PubMed
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Analysis of HIV-1 genetic subtypes in Finland reveals good correlation between molecular and epidemiological data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196799
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2000;32(5):475-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Liitsola
P. Holmström
T. Laukkanen
H. Brummer-Korvenkontio
P. Leinikki
M O Salminen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, HIV Laboratory, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2000;32(5):475-80
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology - virology
HIV-1 - classification - genetics
Humans
Molecular Epidemiology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
The molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 genetic subtypes was studied in a cross-sectional sample collected from HIV-infected individuals living in Finland between 1988 and 1994 and compared with independently collected epidemiological data. Subtypes were determined by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the gag NCp7 and the env coding regions of PBMC provirus. Finnish viruses belonging to 7 subtypes were found. Two thirds (n = 70) of the sequences could be classified as subtype B, while others belonged to subtypes A, C, D, F and G and the circulating recombinant form AE(CM240) (n = 25). There were significant differences in gender distribution and mode-of-transmission between B-type infections and infections with the other subtypes. Most subtype B strains in Finland were associated with homosexual transmission and about half of these were acquired in Finland, while most individuals harbouring non-B infections indicated heterosexual transmission and direct or indirect contact with Africa or Southeast Asia. The heterogeneity of genetic subtypes in the country was in good agreement with the epidemiological data suggesting that a significant proportion of infections were imported. HIV-1 subtype determination may prove to be a valuable tool for providing objective epidemiological data.
PubMed ID
11055649 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of HIV-1 integrase gene polymorphism in an HIV-infected population from the nosocomial outbreak of HIV infection in the south of Russia in 1989].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144460
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2010 Jan-Feb;55(1):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
I E Gafarova
Zh A Shideeva
D B Sandzhieva
M M Garaev
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2010 Jan-Feb;55(1):16-22
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - epidemiology - virology
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Female
Genes, pol
HIV Infections - epidemiology - virology
HIV Integrase - drug effects - genetics
HIV Integrase Inhibitors - pharmacology
HIV-1 - drug effects - genetics
Humans
Male
Molecular Epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper presents the data of an investigation of the polymorphism of the pol gene encoding HIV-1 integrase in a HIV subtype G infected population formed during the 1989 HIV-infection outbreak. The investigators analyzed 41 samples of the viruses obtained in 2005-2007. Polymorphism at codons associated with integrase resistance to chemicals was observed in 11 virus variants. The circulation of mutation viruses that potentially promote the formation of resistance to the integrase inhibitors raltegravir and elvitegravir has been established in untreated patients.
PubMed ID
20364666 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Puumala hantavirus in a bank vole population in northern Finland: evidence for co-circulation of two genetic lineages and frequent reassortment between strains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151379
Source
J Gen Virol. 2009 Aug;90(Pt 8):1923-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Maria Razzauti
Angelina Plyusnina
Tarja Sironen
Heikki Henttonen
Alexander Plyusnin
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Infection Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. maria.razzauti@hwlsinki.fi
Source
J Gen Virol. 2009 Aug;90(Pt 8):1923-31
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Arvicolinae - virology
Cluster analysis
Evolution, Molecular
Finland
Genotype
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - veterinary - virology
Humans
Lung - virology
Molecular Epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Puumala virus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reassortant Viruses - genetics - isolation & purification
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology
Abstract
In this study, for the first time, two distinct genetic lineages of Puumala virus (PUUV) were found within a small sampling area and within a single host genetic lineage (Ural mtDNA) at Pallasjärvi, northern Finland. Lung tissue samples of 171 bank voles (Myodes glareolus) trapped in September 1998 were screened for the presence of PUUV nucleocapsid antigen and 25 were found to be positive. Partial sequences of the PUUV small (S), medium (M) and large (L) genome segments were recovered from these samples using RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two genetic groups of PUUV sequences that belonged to the Finnish and north Scandinavian lineages. This presented a unique opportunity to study inter-lineage reassortment in PUUV; indeed, 32 % of the studied bank voles appeared to carry reassortant virus genomes. Thus, the frequency of inter-lineage reassortment in PUUV was comparable to that of intra-lineage reassortment observed previously (Razzauti, M., Plyusnina, A., Henttonen, H. & Plyusnin, A. (2008). J Gen Virol 89, 1649-1660). Of six possible reassortant S/M/L combinations, only two were found at Pallasjärvi and, notably, in all reassortants, both S and L segments originated from the same genetic lineage, suggesting a non-random pattern for the reassortment. These findings are discussed in connection to PUUV evolution in Fennoscandia.
PubMed ID
19386780 View in PubMed
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445 records – page 1 of 45.