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3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness, part 1: contextualizing case management for ending homelessness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130590
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, AB, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management
Community Health Services
Concept Formation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Homeless Persons
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, organizational
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and part-2 articulates the 6 Dimensions of Quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are: (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
21986969 View in PubMed
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2020 healthcare management in Canada: a new model home next door.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184152
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):6-10, 44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
D Wayne Taylor
Author Affiliation
Michael G. DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2003;16(1):6-10, 44-9
Date
2003
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Sharing
Efficiency
Employment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Reform
Health Expenditures - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Models, organizational
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration - trends
Politics
Population Dynamics
Social Change
Social Values
Taxes - trends
Abstract
The Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada asked whether Medicare is sustainable in its present form. Well, Medicare is not sustainable for at least six reasons. Given a long list of factors, such as Canada's changing dependency ratio, the phenomenon of diminishing returns from increased taxation, competing provincial expenditure needs, low labour and technological productivity in government-funded healthcare, the expectations held by baby boomers, and the evolving value sets of Canadians--Medicare will impoverish Canada within the next couple of decades if not seriously recast. As distasteful as parallel private-pay, private-choice healthcare may be to some policy makers and providers who grew up in the 1960s, the reality of the 2020s will dictate its necessity as a pragmatic solution to a systemic problem.
PubMed ID
12908160 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
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Achieving the 'perfect handoff' in patient transfers: building teamwork and trust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122387
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2012 Jul;20(5):592-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Diana Clarke
Kim Werestiuk
Andrea Schoffner
Judy Gerard
Katie Swan
Bobbi Jackson
Betty Steeves
Shelley Probizanski
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. diana_clarke@umanitoba.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2012 Jul;20(5):592-8
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Checklist
Communication
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient care team
Patient transfer
Program Development
Trust
Abstract
To use the philosophy and methodology of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) in the investigation of unit to unit transfers to determine aspects which are working well and should be incorporated into standard practice.
Handoffs can result in threats to patient safety and an atmosphere of distrust and blaming among staff can be engendered. As the majority of handoffs go well, an alternative is to build on successful handoffs.
The AI methodology was used to discover what was currently working well in unit to unit transfers. The data from semi-structured interviews that were conducted with staff, patients, and family informed structural process improvements.
Themes extracted from the interviews focused on the situational variables necessary for the perfect transfer, the mode and content of transfer-related communication, and important factors in communication with the patient and family.
This project was successful in demonstrating the usefulness of AI as both a quality improvement methodology and a strategy to build trust among key stakeholders.
Giving staff members the opportunity to contribute positively to process improvements and share their ideas for innovation has the potential to highlight expertise and everyday accomplishments enhancing morale and reducing conflict.
PubMed ID
22823214 View in PubMed
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[A competence center for Sjogren's syndrome--an example to be followed]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14186
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Nov 10;118(27):4195
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1998

Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180338
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Bryn Williams-Jones
Janice E Graham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Research & Homerton College, University of Cambridge, UK.
Source
New Genet Soc. 2003 Dec;22(3):271-96
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Canada
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Genes, BRCA1
Genes, BRCA2
Genetic Counseling
Genetic Research
Genetic Services - economics - ethics - trends
Genetic Testing - economics - ethics - methods
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Industry
Internationality
Marketing
Models, organizational
Patents as Topic
Private Sector
Public Policy
Public Sector
Research Support as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Technology Transfer
Abstract
Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies.
PubMed ID
15115034 View in PubMed
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Actor or arena: contrasting translations of a law on interorganizational integration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117925
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2012;26(6):778-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Johanna Andersson
Mikael Löfström
Susanna Bihari Axelsson
Runo Axelsson
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health NHV, Gothenburg, Sweden. johanna.andersson@nhv.se
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2012;26(6):778-93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Financial Management - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, organizational
Rehabilitation, Vocational - economics
Social Work - economics - organization & administration
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish framework law has enabled integration between public agencies in vocational rehabilitation. With the support of this law, coordination associations can be formed to fund and organize joint activities. The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze how the law has been interpreted and translated into local coordination associations and how local institutional logics have developed to guide the organization of these associations.
Data was collected through observations of meetings within two coordination associations and supplemented with documents. The material was analyzed by compilation and examination of data from field notes, whereupon the most important aspects were crystallized and framed with institutional organization theory.
Two different translations of the law were seen in the associations studied: the association as an independent actor, and as an arena for its member organizations. Two subsequent institutional logics have developed, influencing decisions on autonomy, objectives and rationality for initiating and organizing in the two associations and their activities. The institutional logics are circular, further enhancing the different translations creating different forms of integration.
Both forms of integration are legitimate, but the different translations have created integration with different degrees of autonomy in relation to the member organizations. Only a long-term analysis can show whether one form of integration is more functional than the other.
This article is based on an extensive material providing insights into a form of interorganizational integration which has been scarcely researched. The findings show how different translations can influence the integration of welfare services.
PubMed ID
23252326 View in PubMed
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Acute care surgery: a new strategy for the general surgery patients left behind.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144682
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Apr;53(2):84-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Chad G Ball
S Morad Hameed
Frederick D Brenneman
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA. ball.chad@gmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2010 Apr;53(2):84-5
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
General Surgery
Humans
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration
Traumatology
Notes
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Apr;54(4):795-712707548
Cites: J Trauma. 2005 Mar;58(3):614-615761359
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2009 Feb;53(2):198-20718439724
Cites: Am Surg. 2007 Feb;73(2):157-6017305294
Cites: Surgery. 2007 Mar;141(3):297-817349834
Cites: J Am Coll Surg. 2006 Apr;202(4):655-6716571438
PubMed ID
20334739 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and implementation of the nurse-family partnership in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Susan M Jack
Dianne Busser
Debbie Sheehan
Andrea Gonzalez
Emily J Zwygers
Harriet L Macmillan
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. jacksm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
International agencies are required to adapt, pilot and then evaluate the effectiveness of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) prior to broad implementation of this public health intervention. The objectives of this qualitative case study were to: 1) determine whether the NFP can be implemented in Canada with fidelity to the US model, and 2) identify the adaptations required to increase the acceptability of the intervention for service providers and families.
108 low-income, first-time mothers in Hamilton, Ontario, received the NFP intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with NFP clients (n=38), family members (n=14) and community professionals (n=24).
Hamilton, Ontario.INTERVENTION AND DATA COLLECTION: An intensive nurse home visitation program delivered to women starting early in pregnancy and continuing until the child was two years old. Processes to adapt and implement the NFP were explored across seven focus groups with public health nurses and managers. Eighty documents were reviewed to identify implementation challenges. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis.
The NFP model elements are acceptable to Canadian health care providers, public health nurses and families receiving the intervention. The primary adaptation required was to reduce nurse caseloads from 25 to 20 active clients. Recommendations for adapting and implementing all model elements are described.
The NFP model requires minor adaptations to increase the acceptability of the intervention to Canadian stakeholders. A consistent approach to adapting the NFP program in Canada is necessary as provincial jurisdictions commit themselves to supporting an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the NFP.
PubMed ID
23618049 View in PubMed
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793 records – page 1 of 80.