Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1792 records – page 1 of 180.

3-D modeling substantiates perfluorinated theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82705
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Renner Rebecca
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):632-3
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Alcohols
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Fluorocarbons - analysis - chemistry
Industry
Manufactured Materials
Models, Theoretical
Octanoic Acids - analysis - chemistry
Notes
Comment On: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Feb 1;40(3):924-3016509338
PubMed ID
16509290 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
Less detail

21st-century modeled permafrost carbon emissions accelerated by abrupt thaw beneath lakes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297387
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
08-15-2018
Author
Katey Walter Anthony
Thomas Schneider von Deimling
Ingmar Nitze
Steve Frolking
Abraham Emond
Ronald Daanen
Peter Anthony
Prajna Lindgren
Benjamin Jones
Guido Grosse
Author Affiliation
Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA. kmwalteranthony@alaska.edu.
Source
Nat Commun. 2018 08 15; 9(1):3262
Date
08-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Carbon - chemistry
Carbon Cycle
Carbon Dioxide - chemistry
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods - trends
Freezing
Geography
Geologic Sediments - chemistry
Global warming
Lakes - chemistry
Methane - chemistry
Models, Theoretical
Permafrost - chemistry
Soil - chemistry
Abstract
Permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) modeling has focused on gradual thaw of near-surface permafrost leading to enhanced carbon dioxide and methane emissions that accelerate global climate warming. These state-of-the-art land models have yet to incorporate deeper, abrupt thaw in the PCF. Here we use model data, supported by field observations, radiocarbon dating, and remote sensing, to show that methane and carbon dioxide emissions from abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes will more than double radiative forcing from circumpolar permafrost-soil carbon fluxes this century. Abrupt thaw lake emissions are similar under moderate and high representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), but their relative contribution to the PCF is much larger under the moderate warming scenario. Abrupt thaw accelerates mobilization of deeply frozen, ancient carbon, increasing 14C-depleted permafrost soil carbon emissions by ~125-190% compared to gradual thaw alone. These findings demonstrate the need to incorporate abrupt thaw processes in earth system models for more comprehensive projection of the PCF this century.
PubMed ID
30111815 View in PubMed
Less detail

1984 annual radiation doses in Canada: lognormal and hybrid lognormal analysis using maximum likelihood estimation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233535
Source
Health Phys. 1988 Feb;54(2):211-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
W N Sont
J P Ashmore
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare, Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1988 Feb;54(2):211-9
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computer simulation
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Medicine
Radiation Dosage
Registries
PubMed ID
3338921 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to health care for economically disadvantaged Canadians: a model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228053
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Nov-Dec;81(6):450-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M J Stewart
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Nov-Dec;81(6):450-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health status
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient Participation
Poverty
Abstract
In Canada, cultural, physical and structural barriers to the poor's accessibility to health care persist. The economically disadvantaged are clearly identified as a national high-risk target group because of poorer health status and health behaviours than higher-income Canadians. A four-component model is proposed to describe the complex, multivariate nature of access to health care for the economically disadvantaged. The mutual effects of characteristics of access and poverty are outlined and strategies to facilitate improved access are delineated and exemplified. Education, comprehensive and personalized care, consumer participation, and environmental strategies, while not uniquely applicable to the needs of the poor, may collectively constitute a reasonable approach to removing barriers to access to care for this vulnerable group. Furthermore, these four strategies are consistent with premises of primary health care and health promotion. While the model encompasses many relevant variables, it is neither exclusive nor all-inclusive. Further research is required to assess the linkage between specific elements of these four components and to conduct monetary and human cost-benefit analyses of recommended approaches.
PubMed ID
2282608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accident prediction models with random corridor parameters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149229
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2009 Sep;41(5):1118-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Karim El-Basyouny
Tarek Sayed
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4. basyouny@civil.ubc.ca
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2009 Sep;41(5):1118-23
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Analysis of Variance
Bayes Theorem
British Columbia
Humans
Markov Chains
Models, Statistical
Models, Theoretical
Poisson Distribution
Risk assessment
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Recent research advocates the use of count models with random parameters as an alternative method for analyzing accident frequencies. In this paper a dataset composed of urban arterials in Vancouver, British Columbia, is considered where the 392 segments were clustered into 58 corridors. The main objective is to assess the corridor effects with alternate specifications. The proposed models were estimated in a Full Bayes context via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation and were compared in terms of their goodness of fit and inference. A variety of covariates were found to significantly influence accident frequencies. However, these covariates resulted in random parameters and thereby their effects on accident frequency were found to vary significantly across corridors. Further, a Poisson-lognormal (PLN) model with random parameters for each corridor provided the best fit. Apart from the improvement in goodness of fit, such an approach is useful in gaining new insights into how accident frequencies are influenced by the covariates, and in accounting for heterogeneity due to unobserved road geometrics, traffic characteristics, environmental factors and driver behavior. The inclusion of corridor effects in the mean function could also explain enough variation that some of the model covariates would be rendered non-significant and thereby affecting model inference.
PubMed ID
19664455 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accountability and pediatric physician-researchers: are theoretical models compatible with Canadian lived experience?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130725
Source
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Christine Czoli
Michael Da Silva
Randi Zlotnik Shaul
Lori d'Agincourt-Canning
Christy Simpson
Katherine Boydell
Natalie Rashkovan
Sharon Vanin
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, c/o Bioethics Department, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:15
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Theoretical
Pediatrics
Physician's Role
Research Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Physician-researchers are bound by professional obligations stemming from both the role of the physician and the role of the researcher. Currently, the dominant models for understanding the relationship between physician-researchers' clinical duties and research duties fit into three categories: the similarity position, the difference position and the middle ground. The law may be said to offer a fourth "model" that is independent from these three categories.These models frame the expectations placed upon physician-researchers by colleagues, regulators, patients and research participants. This paper examines the extent to which the data from semi-structured interviews with 30 physician-researchers at three major pediatric hospitals in Canada reflect these traditional models. It seeks to determine the extent to which existing models align with the described lived experience of the pediatric physician-researchers interviewed.Ultimately, we find that although some physician-researchers make references to something like the weak version of the similarity position, the pediatric-researchers interviewed in this study did not describe their dual roles in a way that tightly mirrors any of the existing theoretical frameworks. We thus conclude that either physician-researchers are in need of better training regarding the nature of the accountability relationships that flow from their dual roles or that models setting out these roles and relationships must be altered to better reflect what we can reasonably expect of physician-researchers in a real-world environment.
Notes
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;38(2):6; author reply 6-718457218
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;38(2):5-6; author reply 6-718457217
Cites: JAMA. 2000 May 24-31;283(20):2701-1110819955
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):3-912189059
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):14-712189062
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):22-312189066
Cites: Am J Bioeth. 2002 Spring;2(2):27-812189069
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Apr 3;348(14):1386-812672868
Cites: Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2003 Jun;13(2):93-11814569997
Cites: Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2003 Dec;13(4):329-4615049297
Cites: Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2003 Dec;13(4):353-715049299
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2004 Jan-Feb;34(1):25-3315098404
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Jul 16;317(3):141-53600702
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Oct 28;280(16):1449-549801009
Cites: Health Law Rev. 2002;10(2):3-1315739307
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 2005 Fall;33(3):566-7416240736
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 2006 Summer;34(2):424-4016789965
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 2008 Mar-Apr;38(2):30-4218457227
PubMed ID
21974866 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for structural and exchange mobility in models of status attainment: Social fluidity in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294359
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
01-2017
Author
Jorge Rodríguez Menés
Author Affiliation
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain. Electronic address: jorge.rodriguez@upf.edu.
Source
Soc Sci Res. 2017 01; 61:112-125
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Children
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment
Father-Child Relations
Fathers
Germany
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Occupations
Social Class
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Abstract
This paper proposes a new method to distinguish structural from exchange mobility in status attainment models with interval endogenous variables. In order to measure structural mobility, the paper proposes to trace occupational and educational changes across generations using information provided by children about their fathers. The validity of the method is assessed by comparing the effects of father's socio-economic status and education on son's status and educational attainments, net of occupational upgrading and educational expansion, in five European countries: Britain, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and Spain, using data from the 2005 EU-SILC survey. The results show that the effect of father's on son's ISEI weakens greatly in all countries after considering occupational upgrading, and that much of father's influence over sons occurs by directing them towards occupations with good economic prospects. Useful extensions to the method are discussed in the conclusions.
PubMed ID
27886723 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for system dynamics in reserve design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87620
Source
Ecol Appl. 2007 Oct;17(7):1954-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Leroux Shawn J
Schmiegelow Fiona K A
Cumming Steve G
Lessard Robert B
Nagy John
Author Affiliation
Canadian BEACONs project, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 751 General Services Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H1, Canada. shawn.leroux@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Ecol Appl. 2007 Oct;17(7):1954-66
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Female
Fires
Models, Theoretical
Northwest Territories
Plants
Reindeer
Abstract
Systematic conservation plans have only recently considered the dynamic nature of ecosystems. Methods have been developed to incorporate climate change, population dynamics, and uncertainty in reserve design, but few studies have examined how to account for natural disturbance. Considering natural disturbance in reserve design may be especially important for the world's remaining intact areas, which still experience active natural disturbance regimes. We developed a spatially explicit, dynamic simulation model, CONSERV, which simulates patch dynamics and fire, and used it to evaluate the efficacy of hypothetical reserve networks in northern Canada. We designed six networks based on conventional reserve design methods, with different conservation targets for woodland caribou habitat, high-quality wetlands, vegetation, water bodies, and relative connectedness. We input the six reserve networks into CONSERV and tracked the ability of each to maintain initial conservation targets through time under an active natural disturbance regime. None of the reserve networks maintained all initial targets, and some over-represented certain features, suggesting that both effectiveness and efficiency of reserve design could be improved through use of spatially explicit dynamic simulation during the planning process. Spatial simulation models of landscape dynamics are commonly used in natural resource management, but we provide the first illustration of their potential use for reserve design. Spatial simulation models could be used iteratively to evaluate competing reserve designs and select targets that have a higher likelihood of being maintained through time. Such models could be combined with dynamic planning techniques to develop a general theory for reserve design in an uncertain world.
PubMed ID
17974334 View in PubMed
Less detail

1792 records – page 1 of 180.