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The 15-Minute Family Interview as a learning strategy for senior undergraduate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117158
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lorraine Holtslander
Jessica Solar
Nicole R Smith
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada. lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca
Source
J Fam Nurs. 2013 May;19(2):230-48
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - methods
Family Nursing - education - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Nursing
Students, Nursing
Abstract
Nursing care of families continues to be a challenge within complex and demanding health-care systems. Educational strategies to bridge the theory-practice gap, connecting classroom learning with clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing education, enable students to develop the skills required to form meaningful partnerships with families. This article describes how undergraduate nursing students complete a 15-Minute Family Interview in a clinical practice setting, and document the interview process in a reflective major paper. Students integrate research and theory and identify ways to improve the care of families in the clinical setting while building communication skills and confidence in interacting with families in everyday practice. The implementation of the assignment and the evaluation of the process, including quotes from 10 student papers and 2 clinical faculty members, are discussed. Implications for education and ongoing research are offered.
PubMed ID
23329627 View in PubMed
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Acting at a disaster site: experiences expressed by Swedish nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210291
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Jan;25(1):155-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
B O Suserud
H. Haljamäe
Author Affiliation
Borås University College of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1997 Jan;25(1):155-62
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disasters
Emergency Nursing - education
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Railroads
Sweden
Abstract
In a previous study the knowledge and views of nursing students on how they thought nurses, both in their professional role and as private persons, should act at a disaster site were evaluated. In the present study the practical functional role and experiences of nurses (n = 16) in two major disaster situations (one 'load and go' and one 'stay and play' type of emergency situation) were assessed from personal interviews along a standardized questionnaire. Nurses more routinely involved in emergency care and nurses with no or limited previous practical experience of disaster nursing were included in the study. Leadership-type actions, i.e. a systematic way of attempting to survey and to comprehend the situation, what has happened, and how many injured there may be at the site of the accident, were reported by most of the experienced nurses, while inexperienced nurses were involved mainly in the immediate care of injured according to directions given by more experienced members of the emergency team. Readiness for action, reflected by having a feeling of being prepared for work at the disaster site, was experienced more often by nurses with considerable previous experience of disaster nursing than by nurses with limited experience. Negative experiences, such as feelings of being insufficient, of unreality, mental strain, and problems in understanding the organization, were commonly mentioned by the inexperienced nurses. The present study stresses the importance, for all types of nurses, of more systematic training in disaster nursing.
PubMed ID
9004024 View in PubMed
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ACTION: application and extension of the GENESIS community analysis model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211809
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
C K Russell
D M Gregory
D. Wotton
E. Mordoch
M M Counts
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, Memphis 38163, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Cultural Diversity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
United States
Urban health
Abstract
GENESIS (General Ethnographic and Nursing Evaluation Studies In the State) is a tested and proven community analysis strategy that integrates ethnographic and epidemiologic data to arrive at a comprehensive, holistic description of the health of a community and its residents. Communities analyzed in most project GENESIS studies have been rural or semirural. ACTION (Assessing Communities Together in the Identification Of Needs) is an extension of the GENESIS community analysis model that was developed to meet the unique needs of community-level research and analysis in an urban, multicultural setting. Significant differences in the context in which the ACTION projects took place necessitated extensions in specific components of the GENESIS model. Application of the GENESIS model by the ACTION team is described. Based on the experiences with ACTION, recommendations are offered for future urban, multicultural community analysis projects.
PubMed ID
8677234 View in PubMed
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Acute care in a geriatric facility: five years at Baycrest Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221915
Source
J Long Term Care Adm. 1993-1994 Winter;21(4):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Gordon
M. Cheung
S. Wiesenthal
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto.
Source
J Long Term Care Adm. 1993-1994 Winter;21(4):30-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing - therapy
Aged
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospitals, Public - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Nursing
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Progressive Patient Care - organization & administration
Abstract
Although most long-term care facilities cannot always evaluate and treat their residents during acute, intercurrent illnesses, it is possible to design systems that allow for effective care without transfer.
PubMed ID
10132996 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and implementation of the nurse-family partnership in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128390
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Susan M Jack
Dianne Busser
Debbie Sheehan
Andrea Gonzalez
Emily J Zwygers
Harriet L Macmillan
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. jacksm@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS42-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Professional-Family Relations
Program Evaluation
Public Health Nursing - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
International agencies are required to adapt, pilot and then evaluate the effectiveness of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) prior to broad implementation of this public health intervention. The objectives of this qualitative case study were to: 1) determine whether the NFP can be implemented in Canada with fidelity to the US model, and 2) identify the adaptations required to increase the acceptability of the intervention for service providers and families.
108 low-income, first-time mothers in Hamilton, Ontario, received the NFP intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with NFP clients (n=38), family members (n=14) and community professionals (n=24).
Hamilton, Ontario.INTERVENTION AND DATA COLLECTION: An intensive nurse home visitation program delivered to women starting early in pregnancy and continuing until the child was two years old. Processes to adapt and implement the NFP were explored across seven focus groups with public health nurses and managers. Eighty documents were reviewed to identify implementation challenges. Data were analyzed using directed content analysis.
The NFP model elements are acceptable to Canadian health care providers, public health nurses and families receiving the intervention. The primary adaptation required was to reduce nurse caseloads from 25 to 20 active clients. Recommendations for adapting and implementing all model elements are described.
The NFP model requires minor adaptations to increase the acceptability of the intervention to Canadian stakeholders. A consistent approach to adapting the NFP program in Canada is necessary as provincial jurisdictions commit themselves to supporting an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the NFP.
PubMed ID
23618049 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of heterosexually infected HIV-positive women: a Swedish pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7968
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1994 Jul-Aug;15(4):265-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
M E Florence
K. Lützén
B. Alexius
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1994 Jul-Aug;15(4):265-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Female
HIV Infections - nursing - psychology - transmission
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Pilot Projects
Sexual Behavior
Social Support
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
The experiences and adaptation of 8 women who were heterosexually infected with the HIV were examined. An interview schedule consisting of open-ended questions was used to elicit a full range of responses. Roy's (1984) adaptation model, focusing on physiological needs, self-concept, role-function, and interdependence provided the structure for analysis of each transcript. The interviews indicated that the women who had strong social and family support were coping better with their situation than were women who had little support. The interview responses also showed a lack of professional comportment among health care professionals in their contact with women who are HIV positive, indicating a need for further investigation of health care workers' knowledge and understanding of the needs of HIV-positive women. To plan effective programs, health care professionals need to identify the specific needs of each woman from a holistic perspective.
PubMed ID
8056643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adequacy of time per visit in community nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188233
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2002;16(1):43-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Rhonda Cockerill
Linda L O'Brien Palla
Michael Murray
Diane Doran
Souraya Sidani
Brenda Laurie Shaw
Jacquelyn Lochhaas Gerlach
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2002;16(1):43-51
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burnout, Professional - nursing
Community Health Nursing
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Models, Nursing
Nursing Staff - psychology
Ontario
Time Factors
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This article is a study of the experiences of community based nurses; specifically, their ratings of the adequacy of time they had to complete treatment and prevention activities. Perception of adequacy of time to complete job functions is important because of its links to job satisfaction and job stress. The largest predictor of a sense of inadequate time was visit characteristics. Specifically, it was the mental health speciality team which was most likely to experience inadequate time to deliver treatment and prevention activities. Possible explanations include the time required to deliver care to this patient population, and/or the greater travelling distances and coordination activities linked to provision of services to this patient population. Nurse characteristics were also important in the analysis. Nurses with an RN designation were less likely to report stress with the time they had to complete their activities. Years of community nursing experience was also an important predictor; individuals with greater community experience were less likely to report inadequate time for their duties.
PubMed ID
12371468 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Adult Critical Care Nursing (ACCN) post-basic distance education program: flexibility in learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221728
Source
AARN News Lett. 1993 Feb;49(2):19-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993

Advice concerning breastfeeding from mothers of infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit: the Roy adaptation model as a conceptual structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59542
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jan;18(1):54-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
K H Nyqvist
P O Sjödén
Author Affiliation
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 95F, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1993 Jan;18(1):54-63
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding
Counseling - methods - standards
Female
Health Facility Environment - standards
Hospitals, University
Humans
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Models, Nursing
Mothers - education - psychology
Nursing Evaluation Research
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Data were collected by telephone interviews with 178 mothers of full-term patients in a NICU (neonatal intensive care unit) concerning advice on facilitation of the initiation of breastfeeding. The main advice to the first author as a nurse in the NICU concerned the environment, advice on breastfeeding, distance between units, work organization and nurse behaviour. The advice to other mothers of patients centred on persistence, physical contact with the infant, and not to let nurses take over maternal role functions. The data were structured into themes and categories, classified by one author and two research assistants according to Roy's adaptation theory, and analysed for degree of interrater agreement. The overall agreement of classification was high, reaching 92.5%. It was easily applied by nurses after a brief introduction and proved useful for structuring interview data. It also contributed to clarification of nurse behaviour and division of roles between nurses and mothers. As the four adaptation modes showed considerable overlap, this kind of classification seems inadvisable for application to the assessment of patient/parent situations in the nursing process. For use in a clinical setting, the theory needs the addition of the interactive aspect of nurse and patient/family role functions, and may then be used as a framework for the development of assessment tools.
PubMed ID
8429168 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affective learning in end-of-life care education: the experience of nurse educators and students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153526
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Louise-Andrée Brien
Alain Legault
Nicole Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Université de Montréal, Quebéc, Canada. louise-andree.brien@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2008 Dec;14(12):610-4
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Competency-Based Education - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Learning
Models, Educational
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem-Based Learning - organization & administration
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Terminal Care - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
Preparing future nurses to care for dying patients and their families represents a challenge for nursing education. Affective learning, essential to nurture a caring perspective in end-of-life care, can elicit strong emotional reactions in students, to which nurse educators must remain keenly sensitive. This article presents the experience of nurse educators and students with experiential and reflective activities addressing the affective domain of learning, within an intensive 4-week undergraduate course on end-of-life care, developed with a competency-based approach. It stressed the importance of strategic teaching for developing interpersonal competencies in end-of-life care, but revealed difficulties for both nurse educators and students in assessing outcomes derived from affective learning.
PubMed ID
19104478 View in PubMed
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475 records – page 1 of 48.