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Mobile devices in medicine: a survey of how medical students, residents, and faculty use smartphones and other mobile devices to find information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256878
Source
J Med Libr Assoc. 2014 Jan;102(1):22-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jill T Boruff
Dale Storie
Author Affiliation
jill.boruff@mcgill.ca , Associate Librarian, Life Sciences Library, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6, Canada; dale.storie@ualberta.ca , Public Services Librarian, John W. Scott Health Sciences Library, University of Alberta, 2K3.28 Walter Mackenzie Centre, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R7, Canada.
Source
J Med Libr Assoc. 2014 Jan;102(1):22-30
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Computers, Handheld - utilization
Faculty, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Internet - utilization
Internship and Residency
Library Services - utilization
Mobile Applications - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The research investigated the extent to which students, residents, and faculty members in Canadian medical faculties use mobile devices, such as smartphones (e.g., iPhone, Android, Blackberry) and tablet computers (e.g., iPad), to answer clinical questions and find medical information. The results of this study will inform how health libraries can effectively support mobile technology and collections.
An electronic survey was distributed by medical librarians at four Canadian universities to medical students, residents, and faculty members via departmental email discussion lists, personal contacts, and relevant websites. It investigated the types of information sought, facilitators to mobile device use in medical information seeking, barriers to access, support needs, familiarity with institutionally licensed resources, and most frequently used resources.
The survey of 1,210 respondents indicated widespread use of smartphones and tablets in clinical settings in 4 Canadian universities. Third- and fourth-year undergraduate students (i.e., those in their clinical clerkships) and medical residents, compared to other graduate students and faculty, used their mobile devices more often, used them for a broader range of activities, and purchased more resources for their devices.
Technological and intellectual barriers do not seem to prevent medical trainees and faculty from regularly using mobile devices for their medical information searches; however, barriers to access and lack of awareness might keep them from using reliable, library-licensed resources.
Libraries should focus on providing access to a smaller number of highly used mobile resources instead of a huge collection until library-licensed mobile resources have streamlined authentication processes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24415916 View in PubMed
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A Mobile Phone Based Method to Assess Energy and Food Intake in Young Children: A Validation Study against the Doubly Labelled Water Method and 24 h Dietary Recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276545
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jan;8(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Christine Delisle Nyström
Elisabet Forsum
Hanna Henriksson
Ylva Trolle-Lagerros
Christel Larsson
Ralph Maddison
Toomas Timpka
Marie Löf
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jan;8(1)
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Candy
Cell Phones
Child, Preschool
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys - instrumentation - methods
Eating
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Female
Fruit
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Mobile Applications - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Vegetables
Water
Abstract
Mobile phones are becoming important instruments for assessing diet and energy intake. We developed the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH), which uses a mobile phone to assess energy and food intake in pre-school children. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare energy intake (EI) using TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water (DLW); and (b) to compare intakes of fruits, vegetables, fruit juice, sweetened beverages, candy, ice cream, and bakery products using TECH with intakes acquired by 24 h dietary recalls. Participants were 39 healthy, Swedish children (5.5 ± 0.5 years) within the ongoing Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers (MINISTOP) obesity prevention trial. Energy and food intakes were assessed during four days using TECH and 24 h telephone dietary recalls. Mean EI (TECH) was not statistically different from TEE (DLW) (5820 ± 820 kJ/24 h and 6040 ± 680 kJ/24 h, respectively). No significant differences in the average food intakes using TECH and 24 h dietary recalls were found. All food intakes were correlated between TECH and the 24 h dietary recalls (? = 0.665-0.896, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
26784226 View in PubMed
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Treatment of stress urinary incontinence with a mobile app: factors associated with success.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297755
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2018 09; 29(9):1325-1333
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Emma Nyström
Ina Asklund
Malin Sjöström
Hans Stenlund
Eva Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Research, Education and Development-Östersund, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. emma.nystrom@regionjh.se.
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2018 09; 29(9):1325-1333
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Mobile Applications - statistics & numerical data
Pelvic Floor
Pregnancy
Quality of Life
Self Care - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Stress urinary incontinence is common among women. First-line treatment includes pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and lifestyle advice, which can be provided via a mobile app. The efficacy of app-based treatment has been demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In this study, we aimed to analyze factors associated with successful treatment.
Secondary analysis of data from the RCT. At baseline and 3-month follow-up, participants (n?=?61) answered questions about symptoms, quality of life, background, and PFMT. Success was defined as rating the condition as much or very much better according to the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire. Factors possibly associated with success were analyzed with univariate logistic regression; if p?
Notes
CommentIn: Int Urogynecol J. 2018 Apr;29(4):613 PMID 29508042
CommentIn: Int Urogynecol J. 2018 Jun;29(6):925 PMID 29594320
PubMed ID
29222718 View in PubMed
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