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32 records – page 1 of 4.

Alcoholism--North America and Asia. A comparison of population surveys with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229351
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1990 Apr;47(4):313-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
J E Helzer
G J Canino
E K Yeh
R C Bland
C K Lee
H G Hwu
S. Newman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110.
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1990 Apr;47(4):313-9
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alberta
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Korea
Male
Middle Aged
Missouri
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Puerto Rico
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Taiwan
Abstract
The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) is a highly structured instrument that enables lay examiners to gather the clinical information necessary to generate psychiatric disorders according to the DSM-III, Feighner, and Research Diagnostic Criteria. It was developed originally as the diagnostic interview for the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) survey. Because it adheres to DSM-III and can be used by lay interviewers, thus making it practical for studies involving large samples, it has been used for other population surveys in North and South America, Europe, and Asia. This investigation compares the epidemiology of DSM-III-defined alcohol abuse and addiction in DIS-based population surveys cross-nationally (in St Louis, Mo; Edmonton, Canada; Puerto Rico; Taipei City, Taiwan; and South Korea). We found considerable variation in the lifetime prevalence of alcoholism but a similarity in the age of onset, the symptomatic expression, and the associated risk factors. We also found an inverse correlation between the prevalence of alcoholism and the strength of the association of the risk factors we examined. The work described herein demonstrates the utility of consistent definition and method in cross-cultural psychiatric research. The substantive findings have implications for the definition of alcoholism and for a better understanding of genetic and environmental interactions in its etiology.
PubMed ID
2322082 View in PubMed
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An assessment of ST-segment measurement variability between two core electrocardiogram laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106098
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2014 Jan-Feb;47(1):38-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
Neda Dianati Maleki
Karen Stocke
Yinggan Zheng
Cynthia M Westerhout
Yuling Fu
Bernard R Chaitman
Ahmed Awad
Pushpa Jagasia
Paul W Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Canadian VIGOUR Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2014 Jan-Feb;47(1):38-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta
Electrocardiography - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Laboratories, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Missouri
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
We evaluated inter-reader agreement of the ST-segment between two electrocardiogram (ECG) core laboratories.
Accurate measurement of the ST-segment is key to diagnosis and management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Clinical trials also rely on adherence to the pre-specified ECG eligibility criteria.
150 patients (100 ST-segment elevation (STE)-ACS, 50 non-STE-ACS) were selected. An experienced ECG reader from each laboratory measured ST-segment deviation on the baseline ECGs (nearest 0.1mm).
?ST-segment deviation showed excellent inter-reader agreement (R=0.965, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.949, 95% CI (0.930-0.963)). Similar agreement was observed when ?ST-segment elevation (?STE) and ?ST-segment depression (?STD) were assessed separately. Better agreement was evident in STE-ACS cohort (ICC (95% CI): 0.968 (0.953-0.978, 0.969 (0.954-0.979), 0.931 (0.899-0.953)) compared to NSTE-ACS patients (ICC (95% CI): 0.860 (0.768-0.917), 0.816 (0.699-0.890), 0.753 (0.605-0.851) across measurement of ?ST-segment deviation, ?STE, and ?STD.
We demonstrated excellent agreement on ST-segment measurements between two experienced readers from two ECG core laboratories.
PubMed ID
24246251 View in PubMed
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Boil before eating: paragonimiasis after eating raw crayfish in the Mississippi River Basin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127661
Source
J La State Med Soc. 2011 Sep-Oct;163(5):261-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
James H Diaz
Author Affiliation
Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, USA.
Source
J La State Med Soc. 2011 Sep-Oct;163(5):261-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Anthelmintics - therapeutic use
Astacoidea - parasitology
Child
Cooking
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Food Contamination
Food Parasitology
Humans
Lung Diseases, Parasitic - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Missouri - epidemiology
Paragonimiasis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Paragonimus westermani
Praziquantel - therapeutic use
Rivers
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Paragonimiasis is a parasitic infection of the lungs caused by zoonotic lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus. Most cases are reported from Asia and caused by P. westermani following consumption of raw crustaceans. With the exception of imported cases, human paragonimiasis was rarely described prior to 1984 in the United States (US), which has only one indigenous lung fluke species, P. kellicotti. Between 1984 and 2010, 15 cases of P. kellicotti paragonimiasis were reported in the United States. This study will analyze all US cases and compare an earlier series of six cases reported during the period 1984-2005 with a recently reported cluster of nine cases from Missouri during the period 2006-2010 in order to determine any significant behavioral and/ or recreational risk factors for paragonimiasis and to recommend early diagnostic, treatment and preventive strategies. Significant behavioral and recreational risk factors included eating raw crayfish while on canoeing trips on local rivers (p = 0.002), eating raw crayfish while on canoeing trips in Missouri (p = 0.002), and eating raw crayfish while intoxicated (p = 0.007). The male:female case ratio was 9.3:1.0 and more than 80% of cases presented with fever, cough, pleural effusions and peripheral eosinophilia. One patient developed cerebral paragonimiasis, and one patient died of pneumonic sepsis. Clinicians should inquire about consumption of raw or undercooked crayfish in all patients with unexplained fever, cough, eosinophilia and pleural effusions returning from camping or canoeing adventures in P. kellicotti-endemic areas of the Mississippi River Drainage Basin; institute diagnostic evaluation by specific parasitological and serological methods and treat all cases as soon as possible to avoid the pulmonary and cerebral complications of paragonimiasis.
PubMed ID
22272548 View in PubMed
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Echinococcosis (hydatid disease) in Missouri: diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration of a lung cyst.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37316
Source
Diagn Cytopathol. 1991;7(5):527-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
E A Ingram
M A Helikson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Missouri, Columbia 65212.
Source
Diagn Cytopathol. 1991;7(5):527-31
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy, Needle
Child
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - pathology
Female
Humans
Missouri
Abstract
Echinococcus granulosus was diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration cytology of a lung cyst in a 6-yr-old white female in central Missouri. No adverse reaction occurred following the aspiration. The cytologic sample yielded clear fluid containing numerous clearly identifiable protoscoleces diagnostic for echinococcosis using routine PAP staining. Since hydatid disease is extremely uncommon in the Midwest, it had not initially been considered in the differential diagnosis. The infection was probably not indigenous to Missouri, since the patient lived the first 3 1/2 yr of life in Alaska, where the organism is endemic. This can only be speculative, however, since echinococcal organisms are found in wildlife in the Midwest.
PubMed ID
1954835 View in PubMed
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Foodborne hepatitis A--Missouri, Wisconsin, and Alaska, 1990-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5681
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1993 Jul 16;42(27):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-1993
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1993 Jul 16;42(27):526-34
Date
Jul-16-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Missouri - epidemiology
Restaurants
Wisconsin - epidemiology
Abstract
Person-to-person spread is the predominant mode of transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. However, based on findings for national surveillance for viral hepatitis, since 1983, 3%-8% of reported hepatitis A cases have been associated with suspected or confirmed foodborne or waterborne outbreaks (1). This report summarizes three recent foodborne outbreaks of hepatitis A and addresses the prevention of this problem.
PubMed ID
8321179 View in PubMed
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Genetic differences at four DNA typing loci in Finnish, Italian, and mixed Caucasian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222727
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1992 Nov 15;89(22):10583-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1992
Author
D E Krane
R W Allen
S A Sawyer
D A Petrov
D L Hartl
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1992 Nov 15;89(22):10583-7
Date
Nov-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Chromosomes, Human
DNA - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland - ethnology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Linkage
Genome, Human
Humans
Italy - ethnology
Missouri
Polymorphism, Genetic
Probability
Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid
Restriction Mapping
Abstract
Highly polymorphic segments of the human genome containing variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) have been widely used to establish DNA profiles of individuals for use in forensics. Methods of estimating the probability of occurrence of matching DNA profiles between two randomly selected individuals have been subject to extensive debate regarding the possibility of significant substructure occurring within the major races. We have sampled two Caucasian subpopulations, Finns and Italians, at four commonly used VNTR loci to determine the extent to which the subgroups differ from each other and from a mixed Caucasian database. The data were also analyzed for the occurrence of linkage disequilibrium among the loci. The allele frequency distributions of some loci were found to differ significantly among the subpopulations in a manner consistent with population substructure. Major differences were also found in the probability of occurrence of matching DNA profiles between two individuals chosen at random from the same subpopulation. With respect to the Finnish and Italian subpopulations, the conventional product rule for estimating the probability of a multilocus VNTR match using a mixed Caucasian database consistently yields estimates that are artificially small. Systematic errors of this type were not found using the interim ceiling principle recently advocated in the National Research Council's report [National Research Council (1992) DNA Technology in Forensic Science (Natl. Acad. Sci., Washington)]. The interim ceiling principle is based on currently available racial or ethnic databases and sets an arbitrary lower limit on each VNTR allele frequency. In the future the ceiling frequencies are expected to be established from more adequate data acquired for relevant VNTR loci from multiple subpopulations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
1438254 View in PubMed
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Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with a conditioning regimen of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide for children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): a phase I study of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196991
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 2000 Oct;35(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
E S Sandler
R. Hagg
M J Coppes
M M Mustafa
A. Gamis
N. Kamani
D. Wall
Author Affiliation
UT Southwestern Medical School and Children's Hospital of Dallas, Dallas, Texas, USA. esandler@nemours.org
Source
Med Pediatr Oncol. 2000 Oct;35(4):403-9
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Busulfan - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Disease-Free Survival
Drug Administration Schedule
Etoposide - administration & dosage
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - mortality - therapy
Male
Missouri
Texas
Transplantation Conditioning
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an important treatment modality for children with AML. The optimal conditioning regimen is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate dosing of etoposide in combination with busulfan and cyclophosphamide in this setting.
Twenty patients with a diagnosis of AML in first or second remission, or myelodysplasia scheduled for bone marrow transplantation, were included in this study. Patients received busulfan 640 mg/m(2) in 16 doses, cyclophosphamide 120 to 150 mg/kg in two doses, and etoposide from 40-60 mg/kg as a single dose. Extensive toxicity data was collected.
Nineteen patients were evaluable for toxicity. Mucositis was seen in all patients. Four patients developed bacteremia and one patient died from overwhelming sepsis on day +3. Four patients developed moderate to severe skin toxicity. The major dose-limiting +3 toxicity was hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 14 of 19 patients. Eight patients developed clinical veno-occlusive disease, including three patients at dose level 4, two of whom had life-threatening disease. This hepatic toxicity defined the MTD of 640 mg/m(2) busulfan, 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide, and 60 mg/kg of etoposide. Overall, 9 of 20 patients enrolled in the study survive in remission, 8/14 allogeneic (median follow-up 44 months), and one of six autologous patients (follow-up, 54 months).
We conclude that the combination of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide at the doses defined above has activity in the treatment of children with high-risk AML/MDS undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Whether it offers an advantage over other conditioning regimens will require a randomized trial with a larger cohort of patients.
PubMed ID
11025470 View in PubMed
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Host-feeding patterns of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) at a temperate North American site.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222084
Source
J Med Entomol. 1993 Jan;30(1):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
Author
H M Savage
M L Niebylski
G C Smith
C J Mitchell
G B Craig
Author Affiliation
Medical Entomology-Ecology Branch, Centers for Disease Control, Ft. Collins, CO 80522.
Source
J Med Entomol. 1993 Jan;30(1):27-34
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aedes - physiology
Animals
Birds
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Insect Vectors - physiology
Mammals
Missouri
Rats
Abstract
Precipitin tests and ELISA were used to investigate host-feeding patterns of 172 blood-fed Aedes albopictus (Skuse) collected at Potosi, MO, during the summers of 1989 and 1990. One hundred ten (64.0%) mosquitoes had fed on mammals, 29 (16.9%) on birds, and none on turtles or snakes. Thirty-three (19.2%) mosquitoes failed to react in all tests. Eighty-six (78.2%) of the 110 mammalian feeds were positive for lower taxa as follows: rabbit, 24.5%; deer, 14.5%; dog, 13.6%; human, 8.2%; squirrel, 7.3%; opossum, 4.5%; myomorph rodents other than Rattus, 3.6%; raccoon, 0.9%; and bovine, 0.9%. Positive feeds were not detected for the following mammals: cat (n = 99); horse (n = 95); Rattus (n = 84); and swine (n = 84). Fourteen (48.3%) of the 29 avian feeds were positive for lower taxa as follows: Passeriformes, 24.1%; Columbiformes, 17.2%; Ciconiiformes, 3.4%; and quail, 3.4%. These data, the first on host-feeding patterns for Ae. albopictus populations in the New World, indicate that Ae. albopictus is an opportunistic feeder that utilizes a wide variety of hosts and, therefore, has the potential to become involved in the transmission cycles of indigenous arboviruses.
PubMed ID
8433336 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.