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[Access to the early diagnosis of dementia in New Brunswick: perceptions of potential users of services depending on the language and the middle of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105864
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sarah Pakzad
Jalila Jbilou
Marie-Claire Paulin
Véronique Fontaine
Denise Donovan
Mathieu Bélanger
Paul-Émile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. sarah.pakzad@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dementia - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The early diagnosis of dementia (EDD) enables the identification of reversible causes of dementia and allows the timely implementation of secondary preventive and therapeutic interventions. This study explores New Brunswick seniors' perceptions of the accessibility and availability of EDD services as well as their satisfaction with them while taking into account their language of use and place of residence (urban or rural).
Self-administered survey exploring perceptions of EDD services in Francophone and Anglophone seniors from rural and urban areas of New Brunswick. Univariate and bivariate analyses were carried out.
Of the 157 participants aged 65 years and over who filled out the survey and whose data were analyzed, 84 identified as Francophone, 72 of whom lived in rural areas. Bivariate analyses showed that linguistic groups were comparable with regard to their perceptions of the availability, access to, and satisfaction with EDD services. However, when taking the geographic dimension into account, linguistic intergroup and intragroup disparities were observed, notably in the areas pertaining to the type of services available in the area.
These results suggest that seniors who live in rural areas of New Brunswick are a particularly vulnerable group with perceived limited access to EDD services in their area.
PubMed ID
24300314 View in PubMed
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Association between patients' gender, age and immigrant background and use of restraint--a 2-year retrospective study at a department of emergency psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163375
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
M. Knutzen
L. Sandvik
E. Hauff
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. maria.knutzen@ulleval.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(3):201-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - methods - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Restraint, Physical - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Social Isolation
Abstract
The study aimed to determine rates and types of patient restraint, and their relationship to age, gender and immigrant background. The study retrospectively examined routinely collected data and data from restraint protocols in a department of acute psychiatry over a 2-year period. Each patient is only counted once in this period, controlling for readmission. Of 960 admitted patients, 14% were exposed to the use of restraints. The rate was significantly higher among patients with immigrant background, especially in the younger age groups. Most commonly used were mechanical restraint alone for native-born patients and a combination of mechanical and pharmacological restraints for patients with immigrant background. The use of restraints decreased when patients reached 60 years. Both patients' age and immigrant background seem to have an impact on the use of restraint.
PubMed ID
17523032 View in PubMed
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The association between relationship markers of sexual orientation and suicide: Denmark, 1990-2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146506
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Feb;46(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Robin M Mathy
Susan D Cochran
Jorn Olsen
Vickie M Mays
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences and Kellogg College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Feb;46(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Bisexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Homosexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality, Female - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality, Male - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sexual Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Minority sexual orientation has been repeatedly linked to elevated rates of suicide attempts. Whether this translates into greater risk for suicide mortality is unclear. We investigated sexual orientation-related differences in suicide mortality in Denmark during the initial 12-year period following legalization of same-sex registered domestic partnerships (RDPs).
Using data from death certificates issued between 1990 and 2001 and population estimates from the Danish census, we estimated suicide mortality risk among individuals classified into one of three marital/cohabitation statuses: current/formerly in same-sex RDPs; current/formerly heterosexually married; or never married/registered.
Risk for suicide mortality was associated with this proxy indicator of sexual orientation, but only significantly among men. The estimated age-adjusted suicide mortality risk for RDP men was nearly eight times greater than for men with positive histories of heterosexual marriage and nearly twice as high for men who had never married.
Suicide risk appears greatly elevated for men in same-sex partnerships in Denmark. To what extent this is true for similar gay and bisexual men who are not in such relationships is unknown, but these findings call for targeted suicide prevention programs aimed at reducing suicide risk among gay and bisexual men.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20033129 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards human papillomavirus vaccination among Arab ethnic minority in Denmark: A qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265152
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):408-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Lina Zeraiq
Dorthe Nielsen
Morten Sodemann
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Jun;43(4):408-14
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arabs - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nuclear Family - ethnology - psychology
Papillomavirus Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Knowledge regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccine uptake among ethnic minorities is poorly explored in Denmark. The objective of this study was to explore attitudes and knowledge towards HPV vaccination among Arab mothers and their daughters.
Five Arabic-speaking focus groups with mothers of vaccine-eligible girls and three focus groups with daughters were conducted. The participants were recruited through different social clubs. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate attitudes and knowledge of HPV vaccination. Meaning condensation inspired by Amedeo Giorgi was used to analyse the transcribed material.
A total of 23 women and 13 daughters were included in this study. The mothers' knowledge regarding HPV was limited to the fact that HPV can cause cervical cancer. Two focus groups mentioned that HPV is a sexually transmitted disease and none of the mothers knew that HPV also causes genital warts. Both mothers and daughters acknowledged that the daughters have deeper insight into health-related issues. A gap of knowledge between generations was identified, as mothers and daughters obtained health information from different sources: mothers used the Arabic TV channels as a source of knowledge and daughters had a range of sources, e.g. school, internet, and Western TV channels. The consequence of these differences in obtaining knowledge is that mothers and daughters lack a common language to discuss health issues. Mothers were influenced by Arabic society, while daughters had created a hybrid of Arabic and Danish. Each generation had its own reasons for accepting the vaccine. The level of HPV knowledge and awareness did not affect their uptake decision in that all the participating mothers had accepted the vaccine for their daughters.
Educational programs should target both mothers and daughters because mothers have an inadequate knowledge about HPV. This is likely to bridge the gap of knowledge between mothers and daughters, which constitutes a barrier between the generations.
PubMed ID
25754868 View in PubMed
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Binge Drinking, Cannabis and Tobacco Use Among Ethnic Norwegian and Ethnic Minority Adolescents in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278845
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2015 Aug;17(4):992-1001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Dawit S Abebe
Gertrud S Hafstad
Geir Scott Brunborg
Bernadette Nirmal Kumar
Lars Lien
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2015 Aug;17(4):992-1001
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - ethnology
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Tobacco Use - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess prevalence and factors associated with binge drinking, cannabis use and tobacco use among ethnic Norwegians and ethnic minority adolescents in Oslo. We used data from a school-based cross-sectional survey of adolescents in junior- and senior high schools in Oslo, Norway. The participants were 10,934 adolescents aged 14-17 years, and just over half were females. The sample was comprised of 73.2 % ethnic Norwegian adolescents, 9.8 % 1st generation immigrants, and 17 % 2nd generation adolescents from Europe, the US, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Logistic regression models were applied for the data analyses. Age, gender, religion, parental education, parent-adolescent relationships, depressive symptoms and loneliness were covariates in the regression models. Ethnic Norwegian adolescents reported the highest prevalence of binge drinking (16.1 %), whereas the lowest prevalence was found among 2nd generation adolescents from Asia (2.9 %). Likewise, the past-year prevalence for cannabis use ranged from 10.6 % among 2nd generation Europeans and those from the US to 3.7 % among 2nd generation Asians. For daily tobacco use, the prevalence ranged from 12.9 % among 2nd generation Europeans and the US to 5.1 % among 2nd generation Asians. Ethnicity, age, gender, religion, parental education, and parent-adolescent relationships and mental health status were significantly associated with binge drinking, cannabis and tobacco use. These factors partly explained the observed differences between ethnic Norwegians and ethnic minority adolescents in the current study. There are significant differences in substance use behaviors between ethnic Norwegian and immigrant youth. Factors like age, gender, religion, parental education and relationships and mental health status might influence the relationship between ethnicity and substance abuse. The findings have implications for planning selective- as well as universal prevention interventions.
PubMed ID
25037580 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in an indigenous minority population. The All-Ireland Traveller Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130019
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1444-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Catherine McGorrian
Leslie Daly
Patricia Fitzpatrick
Ronnie G Moore
Jill Turner
Cecily C Kelleher
Author Affiliation
UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Population Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. catherine.mcgorrian@ucd.ie
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1444-53
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - economics - ethnology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Censuses
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Minority Health - economics - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sedentary Lifestyle - ethnology
Smoking - ethnology
Social Class
Transients and Migrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Trust
Young Adult
Abstract
The Traveller community are an indigenous minority group in Great Britain and Ireland who experience premature mortality. While minority populations worldwide are known to have high rates of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), Traveller CVD risk has not previously been defined.
All-Ireland cross-sectional census survey of the Traveller minority population (n?=?10,615 families).
A subsample of adult respondents completed a health survey (n?=?2023). CVD was defined as self-report of doctor-diagnosed heart attack, angina, or stroke. CVD risk factors and measures of social position were examined in the Traveller group using age-adjusted prevalence and prevalence ratios (PR). Comparisons were made with a general population sample of low socioeconomic status.
Age-adjusted prevalence of CVD in the Traveller population was 5.6% (95% CI 4.6-6.8), similar to that in the comparator population. Compared to those without CVD, Travellers with CVD had a higher prevalence of self-report of diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, current smoking, and a measure of distrust. Compared with the general population sample, Travellers had a higher prevalence of diabetes (adjusted PR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1-3.8) and lifestyle-related risk factors such as smoking (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4), fried food consumption (PR 2.8, 95% CI 2.4-3.2), and physical inactivity (PR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4).
This comprehensive census survey confirms CVD as an important health risk in the economically disadvantaged Irish Traveller community. Our findings add to the international knowledge base on minority populations and CVD risk.
PubMed ID
22042910 View in PubMed
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Childhood trauma mediates the association between ethnic minority status and more severe hallucinations in psychotic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265239
Source
Psychol Med. 2015 Jan;45(1):133-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
A O Berg
M. Aas
S. Larsson
M. Nerhus
E. Hauff
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2015 Jan;45(1):133-42
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Africa - ethnology
Aged
Asia - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hallucinations - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
Ethnic minority status and childhood trauma are established risk factors for psychotic disorders. Both are found to be associated with increased level of positive symptoms, in particular auditory hallucinations. Our main aim was to investigate the experience and effect of childhood trauma in patients with psychosis from ethnic minorities, hypothesizing that they would report more childhood trauma than the majority and that this would be associated with more current and lifetime hallucinations.
In this cross-sectional study we included 454 patients with a SCID-I DSM-IV diagnosis of non-affective or affective psychotic disorder. Current hallucinations were measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (P3; Hallucinatory Behaviour). Lifetime hallucinations were assessed with the SCID-I items: auditory hallucinations, voices commenting and two or more voices conversing. Childhood trauma was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, self-report version.
Patients from ethnic minority groups (n = 69) reported significantly more childhood trauma, specifically physical abuse/neglect, and sexual abuse. They had significantly more current hallucinatory behaviour and lifetime symptoms of hearing two or more voices conversing. Regression analyses revealed that the presence of childhood trauma mediated the association between ethnic minorities and hallucinations.
More childhood trauma in ethnic minorities with psychosis may partially explain findings of more positive symptoms, especially hallucinations, in this group. The association between childhood trauma and these first-rank symptoms may in part explain this group's higher risk of being diagnosed with a schizophrenia-spectrum diagnosis. The findings show the importance of childhood trauma in symptom development in psychosis.
PubMed ID
25065296 View in PubMed
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Comparison of dietary intake between Francophones and Anglophones in Canada: data from CCHS 2.2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105860
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S31-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Malek Batal
Ewa Makvandi
Pascal Imbeault
Isabelle Gagnon-Arpin
Jean Grenier
Marie-Hélène Chomienne
Louise Bouchard
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa Réseau de recherche appliquée sur la santé des francophones de l'Ontario (RRASFO). malek.batal@uottawa.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S31-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Choice Behavior
Diet - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Energy intake
Female
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Nutritional Status
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare the dietary intake and food choices between Francophone Canadians in a state of linguistic minority (outside of Quebec) and the English-speaking majority.
We used the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) cycle 2.2 (general health and 24-hour dietary recalls) to describe dietary intake of Francophone Canadians (excluding Quebec) and compare them to the English-speaking majority. The linguistic variable was determined by languages spoken at home, first language learned and still understood, language of interview, and language of preference. The mean differences in daily nutrient and food intake were assessed by t and chi-square tests.
Differences in total energy and daily food intakes by language groups were not observed in the sample; however, significant differences in weekly consumption were found in different age and sex categories: lower fruits and vegetables consumption, and vitamins and macronutrients intakes for older Francophone men and higher intakes of energy and saturated fat from "unhealthy" foods for Francophone men 19-30 years of age. Based on the Acceptable Macronutrients Distribution Range (AMDR), approximately 50% of the sample exceeded their acceptable energy intake from saturated fats, and 80% were below their required intake of linoleic fatty acid.
We confirmed that belonging to Francophone minorities in Canada affects food choices and nutritional well-being of this population. The most vulnerable groups identified by our study were Francophone men in the youngest (19-30) and older (50 and over) age categories. The extent to which the cultural setting influences the diet and, in turn, the health of the minority population needs further examination.
PubMed ID
24300318 View in PubMed
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Ethnic Differences in Persistence with COPD Medications: a Register-Based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291324
Source
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2017 Dec; 4(6):1246-1252
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Yusun Hu
Lourdes Cantarero-Arévalo
Anne Frølich
Ramune Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Pharmacy, Section for Social and Clinical Pharmacy, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2017 Dec; 4(6):1246-1252
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Delayed-Action Preparations
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ethnic groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - drug therapy - ethnology
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Long-acting bronchodilators (LABDs) are recommended as a first-line maintenance therapy in patients with moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the study was to explore potential ethnic differences in persistence with LABD in COPD patients.
A cohort of COPD patients diagnosed in 2003-2007 in Copenhagen, Denmark, was followed for 2 years in the Danish national registers. According to the number of the LABD medications dispensed, individuals were categorized into three therapy groups: monotherapy, drug combination therapy, and multiple drug therapy. Persistence was defined as the period from the first prescription date to the date of discontinuation. Treatment was considered discontinued if the interval between the two prescriptions was longer than the number of days of cumulative medication supply according to defined daily doses plus 7 days.
In total, 1129 incident COPD patients using LABDs were included; 6.7% had other than Danish ethnic background. Survival analyses showed that in the cases where LABD medication combination presented COPD maintenance therapy, ethnic background was associated with the higher risk of the therapy discontinuation: HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.03-1.90, p = 0.03. There were no ethnic differences in persistence in the monotherapy or multiple therapy groups.
COPD patients with other than Danish ethnic background discontinued COPD maintenance therapy more often than ethnic Danes. Attention to the barriers of persistent COPD medication use in COPD patients from ethnic minorities should be payed to facilitate better COPD management.
Notes
ErratumIn: J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2017 May 9;: PMID 28488250
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PubMed ID
28409477 View in PubMed
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Ethnicity, but not cancer family history, is related to response to a population-based mailed questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182470
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Jan;14(1):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Cristina Mancuso
Gord Glendon
Lynn Anson-Cartwright
Ellen Juqing Shi
Irene Andrulis
Julia Knight
Author Affiliation
Ontario Familial Breast Cancer Registry, Ontario Cancer Institute, Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Jan;14(1):36-43
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - genetics
Family Health - ethnology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - ethnology - genetics
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Registries
Reminder Systems
Risk factors
SEER Program
Abstract
To determine if family history and ethnic background are factors affecting response to a mailed cancer family history questionnaire from the Ontario Familial Breast Cancer Registry.
Individuals diagnosed with primary invasive breast carcinomas (probands) were mailed a family history questionnaire, the first contact in a multi-stage process. This questionnaire obtained cancer family history and ethnicity data. After one month, a follow up telephone call was made to those who did not return this questionnaire and attempts were made to ask similar questions by telephone interview. Characteristics of those responding to the mailed questionnaire were compared to those who responded to the telephone interview only.
339 probands were included in this study: 242 returned a mailed version of the questionnaire; 57 completed the questionnaire over the phone. Cancer family history/genetic risk criteria was not significantly related to type of response. Probands identifying themselves as visible minorities were significantly less likely to respond to the mailed questionnaire than the telephone interview (11.6% vs. 22.8%, P=0.03).
Having a family history of cancer did not appear to influence response to a mailed questionnaire, but those reporting an ethnic/racial background other than White were more likely to respond to a telephone interview.
PubMed ID
14664778 View in PubMed
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