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Public policy and aboriginal peoples in Canada: taking a life-course perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133006
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S15-S31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Cooke
Jennifer McWhirter
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S15-S31
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Government - history
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Life Change Events - history
Minority Groups - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Minority Health - ethnology - history
Public Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Change - history
Social Conditions - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The health and social conditions of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples in Canada remain important policy concerns. The life course has been proposed by some as a framework for analysis that could assist in the development of policies that would improve the economic and social inclusion of Aboriginal peoples. In this paper we support the goal of applying a life-course perspective to policies related to Aboriginal peoples but suggest that the framework needs to consider the unique relationship between Aboriginal peoples and public policies. We provide some illustrations using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.
PubMed ID
21751484 View in PubMed
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Status homogamy in the preindustrial marriage market: partner selection according to age, social origin, and place of birth in nineteenth-century rural Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146798
Source
J Fam Hist. 2009 Oct;34(4):387-406
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Martin Dribe
Christer Lundh
Author Affiliation
Lund Univ., Sweden; Univ. of Gothenburg, Sweden
Source
J Fam Hist. 2009 Oct;34(4):387-406
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Networks - economics - history
Ethnic Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Family Health - ethnology
Family Relations - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 19th Century
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Minority Groups - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Social Behavior
Social Class - history
Social Conditions - economics - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Sweden - ethnology
Abstract
This article studies partner selection according to three dimensions: social origin, age, and place of birth. The authors use micro-level data from local population registers in five parishes in southern Sweden from 1815 to 1895. The results confirm that all three aspects were important but that socioeconomic status was the most important characteristic, structuring much of the selection process. The importance of social and age homogamy remained stable over the period, while geographic exogamy became more frequent, which could be interpreted in terms of an increasing openness of rural society. The authors also find some indications of exchange of characteristics in the partner selection process.
PubMed ID
19999643 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.