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364 records – page 1 of 37.

Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-30-2017
Author
Jon Røyne Kyllingstad
Author Affiliation
Norsk Teknisk Museum/The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Oslo, Norway, jon.kyllingstad@tekniskmuseum.no.
Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Date
Dec-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Anthropology
Continental Population Groups - ethnology - history
Emigration and Immigration
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Minority Groups
Norway - ethnology
Racism - ethnology - history
Science
PubMed ID
28708062 View in PubMed
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[Access of French-speaking elderly to nursing homes among minorities, a linguistic challenge for health and greater welfare].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129806
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Eric Forgues
Michel Doucet
Josée Guignard Noël
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. eric.forgues@umoncton.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Dec;30(4):603-16
Date
Dec-2011
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication Barriers
Health Services Accessibility
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Language
Minority Groups
New Brunswick
Nursing Homes
Abstract
Access to long-term nursing homes by French-speaking seniors in minority situations is a very real problem. However, few studies have been conducted on this subject. We wanted to better understand this issue in New Brunswick while taking into account the language aspect. In this article, we will present the problem based on different issues encountered by Francophones in minority situations and by giving an overview of the studies conducted on French-speaking seniors in minority situations. We will then address the issue related to the rights of French-speaking senior to receive services in French in nursing homes by analyzing briefly the province's legal requirements. Furthermore, we will present the regulatory framework of nursing homes in New Brunswick. Finally, we will provide a geographic analysis of existing New Brunswick nursing homes while taking into account the language aspect, the levels of service and the distribution of French-speaking seniors within the territory.
PubMed ID
22067633 View in PubMed
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[Access to the early diagnosis of dementia in New Brunswick: perceptions of potential users of services depending on the language and the middle of life].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105864
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sarah Pakzad
Jalila Jbilou
Marie-Claire Paulin
Véronique Fontaine
Denise Donovan
Mathieu Bélanger
Paul-Émile Bourque
Author Affiliation
Université de Moncton. sarah.pakzad@umoncton.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S16-20
Date
2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dementia - diagnosis
Early Diagnosis
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
New Brunswick
Patient satisfaction
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The early diagnosis of dementia (EDD) enables the identification of reversible causes of dementia and allows the timely implementation of secondary preventive and therapeutic interventions. This study explores New Brunswick seniors' perceptions of the accessibility and availability of EDD services as well as their satisfaction with them while taking into account their language of use and place of residence (urban or rural).
Self-administered survey exploring perceptions of EDD services in Francophone and Anglophone seniors from rural and urban areas of New Brunswick. Univariate and bivariate analyses were carried out.
Of the 157 participants aged 65 years and over who filled out the survey and whose data were analyzed, 84 identified as Francophone, 72 of whom lived in rural areas. Bivariate analyses showed that linguistic groups were comparable with regard to their perceptions of the availability, access to, and satisfaction with EDD services. However, when taking the geographic dimension into account, linguistic intergroup and intragroup disparities were observed, notably in the areas pertaining to the type of services available in the area.
These results suggest that seniors who live in rural areas of New Brunswick are a particularly vulnerable group with perceived limited access to EDD services in their area.
PubMed ID
24300314 View in PubMed
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Accounting for Irish Catholic ill health in Scotland: a qualitative exploration of some links between 'religion', class and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179028
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Patricia Walls
Rory Williams
Author Affiliation
MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow. WallsAMP@aol.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2004 Jul;26(5):527-56
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Choice
Career Mobility
Catholicism - psychology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Employment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Ireland - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Prejudice
Protestantism - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Scotland - epidemiology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options. The paper considers whether the competence of Catholics or Catholic cultural factors are implicated in thwarting social mobility among Catholics or, alternatively, whether institutional sectarianism is involved. We conclude that, of these options, theories of institutional sectarianism provide the hypothesis which currently best fits these data. In Glasgow, people of indigenous Irish descent are recognisable from their names and Catholic background and are identified as Catholic by others. Overt historical exclusion of Catholics from middle class employment options now seems to take unrecognised forms in routine assumptions and practices which restrict Catholic employment opportunities. It is argued that younger Catholics use education to overcome the obstacles to mobility faced by older people and circumvent exclusions by recourse to middle class public-sector employment. This paper aims to link historical, structural and sectarian patterns of employment experience to accounts of health and work, and in so doing to contribute to an explanation for the relatively poor health of Catholic Glaswegians with Irish roots.
PubMed ID
15283776 View in PubMed
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Acculturation strategies and ethnic identity as predictors of behavior problems in arctic minority adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5544
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;42(1):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Siv Kvernmo
Sonja Heyerdahl
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Medical Faculty, University of Tromsoe, Norway. sivk@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;42(1):57-65
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Minority Groups - psychology
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Social Identification
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of acculturation attitudes and ethnic and national identity on behavior problems in arctic minority adolescents in northern Norway. METHOD: The Youth Self-Report, the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, and acculturation strategies were completed by 581 indigenous Sami and 291 Kven high school students in 1994-1995, at age 15-18 years. Response rate was 85%. Behavior problems were in addition to ethnic/national identity and acculturation attitudes studied in relation to ethnicity, gender, age, socioeconomic status, parentage, ethnic language, and ethnic context. RESULTS: Although there were no ethnic group differences in behavior problems, the impact of ethnocultural predictors differed between ethnocultural and indigenous adolescents. Acculturation attitudes were most significant for indigenous adolescents' mental health, and identity issues showed the strongest impact on ethnocultural peers. The study revealed significant gender differences regarding the influence of ethnocultural factors, and contextual variation among Sami adolescents with the strongest impact in contexts with low density of Sami people. CONCLUSIONS: The significant ethnic group variations emphasize the importance of conducting both between- and within-group analysis on the impact of ethnocultural issues on behavior problems in minority adolescents.
PubMed ID
12500077 View in PubMed
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Activism for medical geographers: American, British and Canadian viewpoints.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103469
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(1):173-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
M R Greenberg
M W Rosenberg
D R Phillips
D. Schneider
Author Affiliation
Department of Urban Studies and Community Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1990;30(1):173-7
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Consumer Advocacy
Educational Status
Great Britain
Health Education - methods
Health planning
Health Policy
Humans
Minority Groups
Research
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Abstract
This paper describes some of our personal efforts to launch research projects that address public health issues of interest to geographers in the United States, Canada and Britain. In pressing these agendas we have found through our experiences that there are personal and disciplinary costs associated with activism. We describe the loss of identity with geography; the frustration of trying to persuade bench scientists, corporate representatives, and government officials of the importance of our work; the loss of research time and contact with both our academic colleagues and students.
PubMed ID
2305280 View in PubMed
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AIDS among racial/ethnic minorities--United States, 1993.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3029
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1994 Sep 9;43(35):644-7, 653-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-1994
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1994 Sep 9;43(35):644-7, 653-5
Date
Sep-9-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - ethnology
Adolescent
Adult
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
In 1993, local, state, and territorial health departments reported to CDC 58,538 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) among racial/ethnic minorities (Table 1). A total of 38,544 (66%) cases were reported among blacks, 18,888 (32%) among Hispanics, 767 (1%) among Asians/Pacific Islanders, and 339 (1%) among American Indians/Alaskan Natives. These cases represented 55% of the 106,949 AIDS cases reported in the United States in 1993. Rates of AIDS and modes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exposure varied substantially both among and within minority populations. This report describes these differences and summarizes the epidemiologic characteristics of AIDS cases reported among racial/ethnic minorities during 1993.
PubMed ID
8072475 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption among racial/ethnic minorities: Theory and research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102394
Source
Alcohol Health & Research World. 1998;22(4):233-241
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Caetano, R
Clark, CL
Tam, T
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Texas, Dallas
Alcohol Research Group, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, California
Source
Alcohol Health & Research World. 1998;22(4):233-241
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African American
AOD use pattern
AOD consumption
Asian American
Causes of AODU (alcohol and other drug use)
Ethnic differences
Hereditary factors
Hispanic
History of AOD use
Literature review
Minority group
Native American
Psychological stress
Racial differences
Sociocultural norms
Abstract
Ethnic minorities (e.g., Hispanics, blacks, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans) are still underrepresented in alcohol research in the United States. Furthermore, existing studies often do not take into consideration the variability that exists within each ethnic group, resulting in inaccurate generalizations. Studies among Hispanics have found substantial differences among Hispanic subgroups in drinking patterns and rates of alcohol-related problems. Moreover, no single variable can explain the observed patterns. Similarly, numerous factors have been shown to shape drinking patterns among blacks, including individual and environmental characteristics as well as historical and cultural factors. Different subgroups of Asian-Americans also vary substantially in their rates of drinking and heavy drinking, although their lifetime alcohol use is lower than the national average. Genetic and cultural factors, as well as stress and historic experiences, may influence drinking patterns of Asian-Americans. The widely differing drinking patterns among Native Americans also are likely shaped by a variety of influences.
Online Resources
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364 records – page 1 of 37.