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[A general survey of epidemiologic research in Norwegian psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236907
Source
Ann Med Psychol (Paris). 1986 Jun;144(6):604-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986

Alcoholics Anonymous and the Minnesota Model of treatment in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137253
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Jan;32(1):36-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
McMenamin D
Warren M
Tyrfingsson T
Hansdóttir I
Dermatis H
Galanter M
McMahon C
Author Affiliation
New York University Medical Center, New York, New York 10016, USA.
Source
Subst Abus. 2011 Jan;32(1):36-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholics Anonymous
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Minnesota
Residential Treatment
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Abstract
This study was undertaken to provide an initial characterization of the current status of patients admitted to an alcoholism treatment program in Iceland. Consistent with the Minnesota Model, 12-step facilitation has been a central component of the program since its inception. Of the 94 patients assessed in this study, 67% were male and 40% had attended over 90 AA meetings prior to admission. The mean number of drinking days during the month prior to admission was 15.51 days and the mean length of hospital stay was 12.32 days. At time of hospital discharge, 39% were referred to residential treatment. Significant predictors of referral to residential treatment included having attended less than 90 AA meetings prior to admission and length of stay.
PubMed ID
21302182 View in PubMed
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Analysis of community-based cardiovascular disease prevention studies--evaluation issues in the North Karelia Project and the Minnesota Heart Health Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236934
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Jun;15(2):176-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
J T Salonen
T E Kottke
D R Jacobs
P J Hannan
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Jun;15(2):176-82
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Finland
Humans
Minnesota
Models, Theoretical
Research Design
Risk
Sampling Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Karelia project of the Minnesota Heart Health Program. International Journal of Epidemiology 1986, 15: 176-182. Community-based cardiovascular disease control studies represent an effort to change cardiovascular disease rates in entire communities. Communities, rather than individuals, are the primary units of analysis. The cross-community multiple time series model to estimate and test the effects is based on multiple communities that are evaluated at several points over time. Issues that influence the power of the analysis include: the number of communities to be studied, community size and composition, sample sizes of surveys, the decision to use cohorts or cross-sectional surveys, the number of surveys conducted in each community, and assumptions of latencies in the effects. These points are illustrated using the experiences of the North Karelia Project and the Minnesota Heart Health Program. The North Karelia Project was a community-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention programme consisting of a five-year intervention period in 1972-7. It took place in two provinces in Finland. The Minnesota Heart Health Program is similar, taking place between 1980 and 1990 in six communities in the American Midwest.
PubMed ID
3721679 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological study of the ocular and visual profiles of Oklahoma Cherokees and Minnesota Chippewas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5412
Source
J Am Optom Assoc. 1990 Oct;61(10):784-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1990
Author
W C Maples
J. Atchley
W. Ashby
T. Ficklin
Author Affiliation
Northeastern State University, College of Optometry, Tahlequah, OK 74464.
Source
J Am Optom Assoc. 1990 Oct;61(10):784-8
Date
Oct-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Astigmatism - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Indians, North American
Minnesota - epidemiology
Myopia - epidemiology
Oklahoma - epidemiology
Prevalence
Refractive Errors - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology
Vision Screening
Abstract
Over the last three decades some American Indian tribes in North America have received attention in the literature as a minority group with unique visual characteristics. Studies on the refractive status of Indians have shown an increase of refractive errors and particularly an abnormally high prevalence, and amount of, with-the-rule astigmatism. These changes appear to have taken place over the last 40 years. Eskimos, on the other hand, have recently showed an astoundingly high incidence of myopia. Other Native American tribes do not show dramatic changes in myopia or astigmatism. The Public Health Service-Indian Health Service, as an ongoing aspect of their responsibilities to Native Americans, perform screenings on children. This study reports the results of visual screenings primarily of Oklahoma Cherokee and Minnesota Chippewa children.
PubMed ID
2246473 View in PubMed
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An international/multicentre report on patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) over the age of 40 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155577
Source
J Cyst Fibros. 2008 Nov;7(6):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Margaret E Hodson
Nicholas J Simmonds
Warren J Warwick
Elizabeth Tullis
Carlo Castellani
Baroukh Assael
John A Dodge
Mary Corey
Author Affiliation
Department of Cystic Fibrosis, Royal Brompton Hospital/Imperial College, London SW3 6NP, UK. m.hodson@imperial.ac.uk
Source
J Cyst Fibros. 2008 Nov;7(6):537-42
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Italy
Life expectancy
London
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Abstract
The lifespan of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is increasing significantly. The objective of this international pilot study was to study the characteristics of these long-term survivors.
Four centres with large CF clinics from London (UK), Minneapolis (USA), Toronto (Canada) and Verona (Italy) identified 366 patients who had survived 40 years and longer.
At all centres males survived longer than females. There were more pancreatic sufficient patients in Verona (60%) and Toronto (40%) than in London (16%) and Minneapolis (21%). The percentage of DeltaF508 homozygous patients varied between 47% in London and 45% in Minneapolis to only 26% in Toronto and 9% in Verona. Average FEV(1) and BMI values of the surviving population appeared to stabilise after 40 years of age. FEV(1) was on average 12% higher in patients who were pancreatic sufficient (p > 0.0001). There was no difference in survival between the centres. The overall median survival after the age of 40 was 13 years. The estimated annual death rate was approximately 3.4% from the age of 40-60 years.
Significant numbers of patients are now surviving to 40 years or more, and it is hoped that an in-depth study of these patients may identify the factors contributing to longer survival.
PubMed ID
18715831 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of measles at an international sporting event with airborne transmission in a domed stadium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215641
Source
J Infect Dis. 1995 Mar;171(3):679-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
K R Ehresmann
C W Hedberg
M B Grimm
C A Norton
K L MacDonald
M T Osterholm
Author Affiliation
Minnesota Department of Health, Minneapolis 55440-9441.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1995 Mar;171(3):679-83
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Male
Measles - epidemiology - transmission
Medical Records
Minnesota - epidemiology
Sports
Abstract
An outbreak of measles occurred in conjunction with the International Special Olympics Games in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area during July 1991. Sixteen outbreak-associated cases of measles were reported among US residents from seven states, with 9 additional cases resulting from subsequent transmission. The primary case was a track and field athlete from Argentina. Transmission occurred in three settings: the opening ceremonies in a domed stadium, track and field events, and first aid stations. Eight secondary cases had their only potential exposure at the opening ceremonies; 2 of these cases were unrelated spectators sitting in the same section of the upper deck > 30.5 m above the athlete's entrance. These findings demonstrate that the risk of indigenous measles transmission associated with international events in the United States must be considered, even in areas without recent measles activity. Moreover, the dynamic airborne transmission of measles illustrates the potential for transmission in the absence of a recognized exposure.
PubMed ID
7876616 View in PubMed
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Antibody biomarker discovery through in vitro directed evolution of consensus recognition epitopes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106196
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Nov 26;110(48):19330-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-2013
Author
John T Ballew
Joseph A Murray
Pekka Collin
Markku Mäki
Martin F Kagnoff
Katri Kaukinen
Patrick S Daugherty
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Bioengineering, Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013 Nov 26;110(48):19330-5
Date
Nov-26-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amino Acid Sequence
Antibodies - blood - diagnostic use
Biological Markers - blood
Celiac Disease - diagnosis - immunology
Cohort Studies
DNA Primers - genetics
Directed Molecular Evolution - methods
Epitopes - genetics
Female
Finland
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptides - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
To enable discovery of serum antibodies indicative of disease and simultaneously develop reagents suitable for diagnosis, in vitro directed evolution was applied to identify consensus peptides recognized by patients' serum antibodies. Bacterial cell-displayed peptide libraries were quantitatively screened for binders to serum antibodies from patients with celiac disease (CD), using cell-sorting instrumentation to identify two distinct consensus epitope families specific to CD patients (PEQ and (E)/DxFV(Y)/FQ). Evolution of the (E)/DxFV(Y)/FQ consensus epitope identified a celiac-specific epitope, distinct from the two CD hallmark antigens tissue transglutaminase-2 and deamidated gliadin, exhibiting 71% sensitivity and 99% specificity (n = 231). Expansion of the first-generation PEQ consensus epitope via in vitro evolution yielded octapeptides QPEQAFPE and PFPEQxFP that identified ?- and ?-gliadins, and their deamidated forms, as immunodominant B-cell epitopes in wheat and related cereal proteins. The evolved octapeptides, but not first-generation peptides, discriminated one-way blinded CD and non-CD sera (n = 78) with exceptional accuracy, yielding 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Because this method, termed antibody diagnostics via evolution of peptides, does not require prior knowledge of pathobiology, it may be broadly useful for de novo discovery of antibody biomarkers and reagents for their detection.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24222690 View in PubMed
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Association between stimulated plasma C-peptide and age: the Wadena City Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73500
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Apr;40(4):309-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
L R French
F C Goetz
A M Martinez
J R Boen
S A Bushhouse
J M Sprafka
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease and Environmental Epidemiology Section, Minnesota Department of Health.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Apr;40(4):309-15
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - blood - metabolism - urine
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood - urine
Cholesterol - blood
Creatinine - blood - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - physiology
Fasting
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Hemoglobins - analysis
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Linear Models
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota
Predictive value of tests
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess age-related changes in stimulated plasma C-peptide in a population-based sample of adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Wadena, Minnesota, a city of 4,699 residents (1980 census) in west central Minnesota, approximately 150 miles from Minneapolis/St. Paul. STUDY SUBJECTS: 344 non-diabetic subjects (NDDG standards) from a stratified random sample of the total adult population of Wadena, MN. The six-study strata were men and women from three age groups: young, 20-39 years of age; middle-aged, 40-59; and older, greater than 60 years of age. MEASUREMENTS: During a liquid meal of Ensure-Plus (Ensure-Plus challenge test; EPCT; Ross Laboratories), blood samples were taken for glucose, free fatty acids, creatinine, and C-peptide. Plasma C-peptide taken 90 minutes after the EPCT was used as a surrogate measure for insulin. Clinical tests included one-time samples for hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoproteins. Physical measurements included height, weight, and blood pressure. Urine was assayed for C-peptide and creatinine. Assays of urine and plasma C-peptide used antibody M1221 (from Novo; Copenhagen, Denmark). MAIN RESULTS: No differences were observed for the relationship between age and C-peptide within each of the three age groups for men and the three age groups for women. However, the levels of plasma C-peptide for older men or women were statistically significantly higher than levels for the young age groups of the same sex; fasting plasma glucose also was higher for older groups of both sexes, and postmeal glucose was significantly higher for older women. There were decreases with age in urine C-peptide clearance for women and men; the decline for women was statistically significant. In multiple regression models for men alone and women alone, that controlled for age, post-meal plasma glucose best explained plasma C-peptide levels. For young men, plasma glucose alone provided the best prediction of plasma C-peptide levels; body mass index (BMI) and plasma glucose provided the best prediction for young women. For older men and both middle-aged and older women, a combination of urine C-peptide clearance and plasma glucose best predicted plasma C-peptide levels; for middle-aged men, BMI also contributed to the prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Secretion of insulin in response to an orally administered mixed meal is undiminished with age in non-diabetic adults.
PubMed ID
1556356 View in PubMed
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The autopsy and epidemiology--Olmsted County, Minnesota and Malmo, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228472
Source
APMIS. 1990 Sep;98(9):765-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
P N Nemetz
E G Tangalos
L T Kurland
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic.
Source
APMIS. 1990 Sep;98(9):765-85
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Databases, Bibliographic
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Minnesota
Research
Sweden
Abstract
The existence of high quality, population-based, medical data facilitates the practice of modern epidemiology with its concomitant benefits for clinical practice and public health policy. Two exceptional examples of such databases are provided by Malmo, Sweden, and Olmsted County, Minnesota. This paper outlines briefly the similarities between these two geographic entities, and focuses, in particular, on the central role of the autopsy in Olmsted County. Changing temporal and spatial patterns of autopsy are reviewed as well as two important related issues: the role of consent and the medico-legal autopsy. The paper concludes with a summary of some of the more noteworthy contributions of autopsy-based epidemiological research in Olmsted County, and offers several recommendations for the establishment of a select network of special population-based study areas. These epidemiological "laboratories", through the interchange of data and tissue specimens, could make significant contributions to the study of diseases both nationally and internationally. Their interactive efforts and high quality data bases would help to increase the efficiency of the expenditure of scarce societal resources in epidemiology and health care.
PubMed ID
2223034 View in PubMed
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159 records – page 1 of 16.