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163 records – page 1 of 17.

[Activity of embryonic mink genome during diapause (cytogenetic analysis): nucleolar and extranucleolar rna synthesis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63769
Source
Ontogenez. 2001 Jul-Aug;32(4):302-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
G K Isakova
L P Zakharenko
M P Abramova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Akademika Lavrent'eva 10, Novosibirsk, 630090 Russia.
Source
Ontogenez. 2001 Jul-Aug;32(4):302-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Autoradiography - methods
Cell Nucleolus - genetics
Cytogenetic Analysis
Embryonic Development - genetics
English Abstract
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
Genome
Mink - embryology - physiology
Pregnancy
RNA - biosynthesis
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
RNA, Nuclear
Abstract
The nucleolar and extranucleolar RNA synthesis was studied in the mink blastocysts at different stages of embryonic diapause and during the periimplantation period using cytoradioautography. The data obtained suggest a differential and stage specific activity of the embryonic mRNA and rRNA synthesis during the period of delayed implantation.
PubMed ID
11573428 View in PubMed
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Acute interstitial pneumonia in mink kits: experimental reproduction of the disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4624
Source
Vet Pathol. 1986 Sep;23(5):579-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1986
Author
S. Alexandersen
Source
Vet Pathol. 1986 Sep;23(5):579-88
Date
Sep-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aleutian Mink Disease - pathology
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - isolation & purification
Animals
Female
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Lung - pathology - ultrastructure
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Mink
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - pathology - veterinary
Pulmonary Fibrosis - pathology - veterinary
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Organ homogenates from kits that died of interstitial pneumonia were inoculated into adult Aleutian disease virus (ADV)-negative mink and shown to contain infectious ADV. Acute interstitial pneumonia was experimentally reproduced with the organ homogenate but only by inoculation of newborn kits born from ADV-negative dams. Older kits and kits from ADV-positive dams did not develop interstitial pneumonia, but later developed the classic form of Aleutian disease. Electron microscopic examination was done on purified suspensions of defined ADV isolates and on purified organ homogenates from kits with spontaneous or experimental interstitial pneumonia. In kits from both groups a virus, morphologically resembling the defined ADV isolates, was demonstrated. Findings of intranuclear inclusion bodies and intranuclear ADV antigen in alveolar type-II cells in affected lungs and the lack of immunologically mediated lesions suggest that lung lesions result from primary viral injury to alveolar type-II cells. Experiments also showed that infection of dams with ADV before pregnancy decreased the number of kits per mated dam and infection with ADV in mid-pregnancy caused fetal death, fetal resorption, or abortion.
PubMed ID
3022453 View in PubMed
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Aleutian disease serology, protein electrophoresis, and pathology of the European mink (Mustela lutreola) from Navarra, Spain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91885
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2008 Sep;39(3):305-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Sánchez-Migallón Guzmán David
Carvajal Ana
García-Marín Juan F
Ferreras María C
Pérez Valentín
Mitchell Mark
Urra Fermín
Ceña Juan C
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-8410, USA.
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2008 Sep;39(3):305-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Aleutian Mink Disease - epidemiology - mortality
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - immunology
Animals
Animals, Wild - microbiology - virology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Cause of Death
Conservation of Natural Resources
Cross-Sectional Studies
Distemper - epidemiology - mortality
Distemper Virus, Canine
Female
Male
Mink
Mycoses - epidemiology - mortality - veterinary
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
The European mink, Mustela lutreola, has suffered a dramatic decline in Europe during the 20th century and is one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. The subpopulation of European mink from Navarra, Spain, estimated to number approximately 420, represents approximately two thirds of the total number of mink in Spain. Aleutian Disease Virus (ADV) is a parvovirus with a high degree of variability that can infect a broad range of mustelid hosts. The pathogenesis of this virus in small carnivores is variable and can be influenced by both host factors (e.g., species, American mink genotype, and immune status) and viral strain. A cross-sectional study was conducted during the pre-reproductive period of February-March 2004 and 2005 and the postreproductive period of September-December 2004. Mink were intensively trapped along seven rivers that were representative of the European mink habitat in Navarra. Antibody counter immunoelectrophoresis against ADV was performed on 84 European mink blood samples. All the samples were negative. Protein electrophoresis was performed on 93 plasma samples. Nine of those samples (9.6%) had gamma globulin levels exceeding 20% of the total plasma protein. Complete necropsies were performed on 23 cadavers of European mink collected in the area between 2000 and 2005. Seventeen of the mink (74%) had traumatic and hemorrhagic lesions compatible with vehicular impact injuries. Although there were no histopathologic lesions associated with ADV, this study documents the first description of a naturally occurring canine distemper virus infection in a European mink. In addition, pulmonary adiaspiromycosis in three European mink from Spain was reported.
PubMed ID
18816991 View in PubMed
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Anatomical distribution and gross pathology of wounds in necropsied farmed mink (Neovison vison) from June and October.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276980
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2016 Jan 25;58:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-2016
Author
Anna Jespersen
Jens Frederik Agger
Tove Clausen
Stine Bertelsen
Henrik Elvang Jensen
Anne Sofie Hammer
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2016 Jan 25;58:6
Date
Jan-25-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Male
Mink - injuries
Seasons
Sex Factors
Abstract
Wounds are regarded as an indicator of reduced welfare in mink production; however, information on the occurrence and significance of wounds is sparse. To provide a basis for assessment and classification of wounds in farmed mink, the distribution pattern and characteristics of wounds in farmed mink in June and October, respectively, is described. A total of 791 and 660 mink from 6 to 12 Danish mink farms, respectively, were examined. The mink were either found dead or were euthanized due to injury or other disease. Mink included from June were kits in the pre-weaning and weaning period (1-2 months old). Mink included from October were juveniles in the late growth period (approximately 5-6 months old) or older. Macroscopic pathology and wound location was systematically recorded.
There was considerable variation in morphology as well as location of wounds between June and October. Wounds were primarily located on the front parts of the body and in the head in June (1-2 month old kits) and mainly on the rear parts of the body and on the tail in October (5-6 month old kits and older). Moreover, there were significantly more females than males with wounds for most wound types, and significant differences in occurrence of ear and tail base wounds between certain colour types.
Wounds varied significantly from June to October with respect to morphology and anatomical location. Wounds in June were primarily located on the front parts of the body and in the head, while wounds in October were mainly present on the hind parts of the body and on the tail. The majority of the wounds were found in specific well defined skin areas and could therefore be grouped into categories according to anatomical location.
Notes
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Cites: Br Poult Sci. 2009 Jul;50(4):407-1719735009
PubMed ID
26809878 View in PubMed
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Application of real-time PCR to detect Aleutian Mink Disease Virus on environmental farm sources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262977
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2014
Author
Alberto Prieto
José Manuel Díaz-Cao
Ricardo Fernández-Antonio
Rosario Panadero
Pablo Díaz
Ceferino López
Patrocinio Morrondo
Pablo Díez-Baños
Gonzalo Fernández
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):355-9
Date
Oct-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aleutian Mink Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus - genetics - isolation & purification
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Mink
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods - veterinary
Regression Analysis
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
The Aleutian Mink Virus (AMDV) causes the Aleutian Mink Disease (AMD) or Mink Plasmacytosis, a disease responsible of high economic losses for industry worldwide. Despite there is evidence of the environmental persistence of the virus, there is not literature on the detection of this virus in environmental samples in farms and this fact would have great importance in the control programs of the disease. In order to detect contamination caused by AMDV on farms, several environmental samples were taken and examined using qPCR. 93.9% of samples taken from farms confirmed to be infected tested positive. The virus was also detected on a farm which, despite having no previous positive results, was sharing personnel with an infected farm. All samples taken from AMD-free farms tested negative, including a farm where an eradication procedure by stamping out had been performed during the preceding months. Higher contamination levels were observed in samples from those surfaces in direct contact with animals. These results are the first demonstration of environmental contamination in farms, hitherto suggested by epidemiological evidences, caused by AMDV on surfaces, furniture and equipments inside mink farms. qPCR is an useful tool for evaluating the spread of AMDV into the environment, and it may have important applications within the disease control programs.
PubMed ID
25183237 View in PubMed
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Associations between biosecurity and outbreaks of canine distemper on Danish mink farms in 2012-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276810
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Sep 30;57:66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2015
Author
Louise Gregers-Jensen
Jens Frederik Agger
Anne Sofie Vedsted Hammer
Lars Andresen
Mariann Chrièl
Emma Hagberg
Mette Kragh Jensen
Mette Sif Hansen
Charlotte Kristiane Hjulsager
Tina Struve
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Sep 30;57:66
Date
Sep-30-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Animals - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Case-Control Studies - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Denmark - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Disease Outbreaks - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Distemper - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Distemper Virus, Canine - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Foxes - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Mink - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Risk Factors - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Vaccination - methods - epidemiology - veterinary - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology - physiology - veterinary
Abstract
During 8 months from July 2012 to February 2013, a major outbreak of canine distemper involving 64 mink farms occurred on the Danish peninsula of Jutland. The canine distemper outbreak was associated with exposure of farmed mink to infected wild carnivores and could represent a deficit in biosecurity on the mink farms. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and association of specific biosecurity measures with the outbreak. The study was carried out in an epidemiological case-control design. The case group consisted of the 61 farms, which had a confirmed outbreak of canine distemper from July 2012 to February 2013. The control group included 54 farms without an outbreak of canine distemper in 2012 or 2013, selected as the closest geographical neighbour to a case farm.
The results showed that significantly more control than case farms had vaccinated their mink against canine distemper virus. Mortality was only assessed on the case farms, and there was a non-significantly lower mortality on vaccinated farms than on the non-vaccinated farms. Furthermore, the proportion of farms with observations of wild red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) inside the farm enclosures were larger for case farms, indicating that the control farms had a better biosecurity or were not equally exposed to canine distemper virus. Generally, all farms had very few specific precautions at the gate entrance in respect to human visitors as well as animals. The use of biosecurity measures was very variable in both case and control farms. Not using plastic boot covers, presence of dogs and cats, presence of demarcated area for changing clothes when entering and leaving the farm area and presence of hand washing facilities significantly lowered the odds of the farm having a canine distemper virus outbreak.
The results of the study indicate that consistent use of correct vaccination strategies, implementation of biosecurity measures and limiting human and animal access to the mink farm can be important factors in reducing the risk for canine distemper outbreaks.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26423523 View in PubMed
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Astrovirus epidemiologically linked to pre-weaning diarrhoea in mink.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61711
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2002 Feb 26;85(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-26-2002
Author
L. Englund
M. Chriél
H H Dietz
K O Hedlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Small Animals, National Veterinary Institute, SE-751 89 Uppsala, Sweden. lena.englund@sva.se
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2002 Feb 26;85(1):1-11
Date
Feb-26-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Suckling
Apocrine Glands - secretion
Astroviridae Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology - veterinary
Astrovirus - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - physiopathology - veterinary - virology
Feces - virology
Intestines - virology
Microscopy, Electron - veterinary
Mink
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Syndrome
Weaning
Abstract
Diarrhoea and excessive secretion from the cervical apocrine glands in young, suckling mink kits is a well-known, but poorly defined, syndrome often referred to as "sticky", "greasy", or "wet" kits. We have performed a case-control study, at farm level as well as at mink kit level, in Denmark and Sweden to investigate whether enteric virus infections may be a risk factor in the development of pre-weaning diarrhoea. Tissue samples from the enteric tract of 180 sacrificed mink kits were analysed histologically. Faecal contents were examined by electron microscopy (EM). Astrovirus was detected in abundance and found to be a significant risk factor both at farm level (OR=21.60, p
PubMed ID
11792486 View in PubMed
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163 records – page 1 of 17.