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65 records – page 1 of 7.

[A follow-up study registered, occupational skin diseases in an iron mine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244572
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1981
Author
A. Thörn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Date
Apr-15-1981
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Mining
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
6452559 View in PubMed
Less detail

The age-related risk of occupational accidents: the case of Swedish iron-ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211973
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
E. Menckel
L. Lundholm
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The paper examines age-related accident risks faced by Swedish male iron-ore miners. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of national registers was conducted over a ten-year period using three times periods of five years and five age categories. Age-related accident frequency, characteristics and severity were examined. High accident ratios were rare among older miners whatever the time period, but some accident patterns became substantially more frequent in some older age cohorts over the years. Injuries tended to be more severe in older age groups, all accidents aggregated as well as by accident pattern. It is concluded that inequality in risk exposure between age groups may explain the lower accident ratios found among older workers, but also that the aging of a working population may lead to the application of task-assignment principles that penalize older workers, at least with regard to certain specific accident risks.
PubMed ID
8799439 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air in mines and health risk (1): A study of the lung cytology of underground workers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68130
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 24;74(34):2819-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1977

[Air in mines and health risk (2): A clinical study of bronchitis in underground workers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68129
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 24;74(34):2822-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1977

Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: a field evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257398
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2014 Feb 28;267:245-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2014
Author
Peter Nason
Raymond H Johnson
Clara Neuschütz
Lena Alakangas
Björn Öhlander
Author Affiliation
Division of Geosciences and Waste Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.nason@ltu.se.
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2014 Feb 28;267:245-54
Date
Feb-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Ash - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Industrial Waste - analysis
Metals - analysis - chemistry
Mining
Oxidation-Reduction
Sewage - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sulfides - chemistry
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation.
PubMed ID
24462894 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of future workshop's usefulness as an ergonomics tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71006
Source
Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2004;10(2):119-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Ingegerd Skoglind-Ohman
Houshang Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. ingskog@tele2.se
Source
Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2004;10(2):119-28
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Education - trends
Female
Forecasting
Health Education - trends
Health Personnel
Human Engineering
Humans
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Personal Satisfaction
Probability
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sweden
Time Factors
Workplace
Abstract
This study was carried out to assess Future Workshop (FW) regarding its usefulness as a participatory ergonomics method, using a descriptive evaluation design analysed by phenomenographical approach. The study was conducted among professional cleaners, health care personnel and miners, with a sample of 105 participating subjects in 8 different FWs. Multiple methods, giving a combination of both qualitative and quantitative data, were used for data collection. Good involvement of participants was observed during workshops. Evaluations immediately after FWs and 3 months later showed a strong relationship with high correlation, indicating that the perception of FW participants was very positive. Interviews revealed conformity between developed problem identification and proposed changes. Participants' own perceptions of FW's influence on creativity depict their belief of developed ideas and solutions in order to identify and solve workplace problems. FW is considered to be a useful ergonomics tool, and its qualities are related to structure and practical performance.
PubMed ID
15182468 View in PubMed
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Blood lead concentrations of Swedish preschool children in a community with high lead levels from mine waste in soil and dust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36237
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Jun;19(3):154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
B. Bjerre
M. Berglund
K. Harsbo
B. Hellman
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Dalarna County Council, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Jun;19(3):154-61
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Mining
Risk factors
Seasons
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The lead concentration in capillary blood was investigated in 49 preschool children (0.7-7.4 years of age) visiting a day-care center in a Swedish community with high lead contamination from mining and milling in soil and dust in populated areas [up to 1400 and 14,000 micrograms.g-1 (6.76 and 67.63 mumol.g-1) of dry weight, respectively]. The blood lead levels were examined twice (in April and in September) in 33 of the children. The lead levels were low on both sampling occasions [arithmetic mean 31 (SD 13, median 30, range 13-79) micrograms.l-1, ie, arithmetic mean 0.15, (SD 0.06, median 0.14, range 0.06-0.38) mumol.l-1]. Whereas children up to four years of age showed significantly increased levels from April to September, a significant decrease was seen in older children. The level of lead in soil at home, gender, smoking habits at home, and estimated level of hand-to-mouth activity did not appear as strong determinants of lead in blood. The results indicate that lead from mine waste in soil and dust fallout does not constitute a significant health hazard for preschool children in Falun.
PubMed ID
8367692 View in PubMed
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Cluster analyses of association of weather, daily factors and emergent medical conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113709
Source
Coll Antropol. 2013 Mar;37(1):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jasmin Malkic
Nermin Sarajlic
Barbara U R Smrke
Dragica Smrke
Author Affiliation
University Hospital, Diagnostics, Anesthesia and Technology Division, Uppsala, Sweden. jasmin.malkic@etfbl.net
Source
Coll Antropol. 2013 Mar;37(1):189-94
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - diagnosis
Algorithms
Chest Pain - diagnosis
Cluster analysis
Data Mining
Databases, Factual
Dizziness
Emergency Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Headache - diagnosis
Humans
Lung Diseases - diagnosis
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Seasons
Stroke - diagnosis
Sweden
Weather
Abstract
The goal of this study was to evaluate associations between the meteorological conditions and the number of emergency cases for five distinctive causes of dispatch groups reported to SOS dispatch centre in Uppsala, Sweden. Center's responsibility include alerting to 17 ambulances in whole Uppsala County, area of 8,209 km2 with around 320,000 inhabitants representing the target patient group. Source of the medical data for this study is the database of dispatch data for the year of 2009, while the metrological data have been provided from Uppsala University Department of Earth Sciences yearly weather report. Medical and meteorological data were summoned into the unified data space where each point represents a day with its weather parameters and dispatch cause group cardinality. DBSCAN data mining algorithm was implemented to five distinctive groups of dispatch causes after the data spaces have gone through the variance adjustment and the principal component analyses. As the result, several point clusters were discovered in each of the examined data spaces indicating the distinctive conditions regarding the weather and daily cardinality of the dispatch cause, as well as the associations between these two. Most interesting finding is that specific type of winter weather formed a cluster only around the days with the high count of breathing difficulties, while one of the summer weather clusters made similar association with the days with low number of cases. Findings were confirmed by confidence level estimation based on signal to noise ratio for the observed data points.
PubMed ID
23697272 View in PubMed
Less detail

Combined effects of mining and smoking in the causation of lung carcinoma. A case-control study in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27129
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1982;21(5):305-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
L. Damber
L G Larsson
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1982;21(5):305-13
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air pollution, radioactive - analysis
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Radon - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
Within a case-control study of male lung carcinoma in northern Sweden combined effects of underground mining (iron ore mines) and smoking were analysed. A synergistic effect was found approximately of multiplicative type. Cases with lung carcinoma exposed to underground mining had a considerably lower average cumulative tobacco consumption than other lung carcinoma cases as an expression of the fact that smoking is particularly dangerous in underground miners. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma was overrepresented among the cases exposed to underground mining and were especially often low tobacco consumers. In the 2 municipalities where the iron mines were located 74 per cent of the male lung carcinoma incidence could be explained by smoking and 55 per cent by underground mining (etiologic fractions).
PubMed ID
6297249 View in PubMed
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65 records – page 1 of 7.