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[A comparative analysis of different approaches to identifying cardiovascular diseases in coal miners during medical selection]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49975
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
L N Sizonenko
V V Cherkesov
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):130-5
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis
Coal Mining
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
English Abstract
Exercise Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis
Personnel Selection - methods
Risk factors
Ukraine
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
An expert evaluation of identifiability of cardiovascular diseases was carried out together with a clinical and functional examination of certain groups of miners of basic underground occupations at different ages and lengths of service, that showed a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases along with a low informative value of methodical approaches, indices and criteria used for their diagnosis in conducting preliminary and periodic health check-ups. To improve the quality of diagnosis of diseases of the circulatory system it is necessary that standardized methods of investigation should be employed together with consistent indices of high informative value as well as a purposive training of physicians.
PubMed ID
10424067 View in PubMed
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[Aerogenic risk factors and diagnosis of bauxite pneumoconiosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112905
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A O Peshkova
N A Roslaia
O F Roslyi
E I Likhacheva
A A Fedoruk
T V Slyshkina
E R Vagina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):15-8
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Aluminum Oxide - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - manpower - standards
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The research purpose is an estimation of influence of the bauxite dust on the state of the bronchopulmonary system of workers. It has been indicated that exposure of the poor fibrogenic dust while the process of the bauxite ore extraction, results in development of pnevmokoniosis characterized by substantial ventilatory and haemodynamic disorders limiting the workability of patients.
PubMed ID
23785803 View in PubMed
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[Age features of epidemiology of arterial hypertension in workers of the coal-mining enterprises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138281
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2011;24(4):697-700
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
S A Maksimov
A E Scripchenko
E V Indukaeva
É B Shapovalova
M Iu Iankin
T A Mulerova
N N Kozyreva
V A Semenikhin
M Iu Ogarkov
G V Artamonova
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2011;24(4):697-700
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Coal Mining - manpower
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - standards - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Occupations
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Workplace - standards
Abstract
The analysis of age features of prevalence of an arterial hypertensia in the basic professional groups of the coal-mining enterprises was carried out. In total 1575 workers of collieries and cuts of Kuzbas united in 9 professional groups participated in the research. The results of research demonstrated the distinctions of age structure in the professional groups, testifying about expressed professional senescence among workers of mines, which reveals itself in the decrease in relative density of persons of 50+ years. In these groups with the expressed professional senescence the decrease in relative density of persons with an arterial hypertensia--so-called effect of the "healthy worker", in turn, is observed.
PubMed ID
22550882 View in PubMed
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Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
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The age-related risk of occupational accidents: the case of Swedish iron-ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211973
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
E. Menckel
L. Lundholm
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The paper examines age-related accident risks faced by Swedish male iron-ore miners. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of national registers was conducted over a ten-year period using three times periods of five years and five age categories. Age-related accident frequency, characteristics and severity were examined. High accident ratios were rare among older miners whatever the time period, but some accident patterns became substantially more frequent in some older age cohorts over the years. Injuries tended to be more severe in older age groups, all accidents aggregated as well as by accident pattern. It is concluded that inequality in risk exposure between age groups may explain the lower accident ratios found among older workers, but also that the aging of a working population may lead to the application of task-assignment principles that penalize older workers, at least with regard to certain specific accident risks.
PubMed ID
8799439 View in PubMed
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Analysing factors related to slipping, stumbling, and falling accidents at work: Application of data mining methods to Finnish occupational accidents and diseases statistics database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121789
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):215-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Noora Nenonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Industrial Management, Center for Safety Management and Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. noora.nenonen@tut.fi
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):215-24
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Data Mining
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Workplace
Wounds and Injuries - etiology
Abstract
The utilisation of data mining methods has become common in many fields. In occupational accident analysis, however, these methods are still rarely exploited. This study applies methods of data mining (decision tree and association rules) to the Finnish national occupational accidents and diseases statistics database to analyse factors related to slipping, stumbling, and falling (SSF) accidents at work from 2006 to 2007. SSF accidents at work constitute a large proportion (22%) of all accidents at work in Finland. In addition, they are more likely to result in longer periods of incapacity for work than other workplace accidents. The most important factor influencing whether or not an accident at work is related to SSF is the specific physical activity of movement. In addition, the risk of SSF accidents at work seems to depend on the occupation and the age of the worker. The results were in line with previous research. Hence the application of data mining methods was considered successful. The results did not reveal anything unexpected though. Nevertheless, because of the capability to illustrate a large dataset and relationships between variables easily, data mining methods were seen as a useful supplementary method in analysing occupational accident data.
PubMed ID
22877702 View in PubMed
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Analysis of fatalities and injuries involving mining equipment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161185
Source
J Safety Res. 2007;38(4):461-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
W A Groves
V J Kecojevic
D. Komljenovic
Author Affiliation
The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, 110 Hosler Building, University Park, PA 16802-5000, USA. wag10@psu.edu
Source
J Safety Res. 2007;38(4):461-70
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Despite significant reductions, the number of injuries and fatalities in mining remains high. A persistent area of concern continues to be equipment-related incidents.
Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and Current Population Survey (CPS) data were used to examine equipment-related injuries over the period 1995-2004. Incidents were reviewed to determine which types of mining equipment were most often involved and to identify and characterize trends.
Non-powered hand tools was the equipment category most often involved with non-fatal injuries while off-road ore haulage was the most common source of fatalities.
Younger employees had an elevated risk of injury while workers >55 years had an elevated risk for fatality. A large majority of incidents involve workers with
PubMed ID
17884433 View in PubMed
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Assessment of hand-arm vibration syndrome in a northern Ontario base metal mine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192001
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2001;22(3-4):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
C. Hill
W J Langis
J E Petherick
D M Campbell
T. Haines
J. Andersen
K K Conley
J. White
N E Lightfoot
R J Bissett
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers Inc.(Sudbury), 1780 Regent Street South, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 3Z8. CHill@ohcow.on.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2001;22(3-4):88-92
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Hand - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Syndrome
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) in 617 workers at a base metal mine in northern Ontario. Workers who were employed at the mine between the years 1989 and 1994 and who continued to live within a 100 km radius of the mine were sent a self-reported questionnaire to identify individuals with possible vibration-induced symptoms in their upper extremities. Of the 162 workers who attended the medical examination, 50% were diagnosed with HAVS, 26% had other diagnoses with some workers having multiple afflictions e.g., both HAVS and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). No vibration-induced symptoms were reported in 35% of the workers who were clinically normal. The study was designed to educate, advise, and to make recommendations on the prevention of HAVS. Ongoing commitments to technological improvements, mandatory and regular rest periods, and continuing educational sessions on the syndrome should help to reduce the prevalence of this disease.
PubMed ID
11779422 View in PubMed
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Blood lead concentrations of Swedish preschool children in a community with high lead levels from mine waste in soil and dust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36237
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Jun;19(3):154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
B. Bjerre
M. Berglund
K. Harsbo
B. Hellman
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, Dalarna County Council, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Jun;19(3):154-61
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Lead - analysis - blood
Male
Mining
Risk factors
Seasons
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The lead concentration in capillary blood was investigated in 49 preschool children (0.7-7.4 years of age) visiting a day-care center in a Swedish community with high lead contamination from mining and milling in soil and dust in populated areas [up to 1400 and 14,000 micrograms.g-1 (6.76 and 67.63 mumol.g-1) of dry weight, respectively]. The blood lead levels were examined twice (in April and in September) in 33 of the children. The lead levels were low on both sampling occasions [arithmetic mean 31 (SD 13, median 30, range 13-79) micrograms.l-1, ie, arithmetic mean 0.15, (SD 0.06, median 0.14, range 0.06-0.38) mumol.l-1]. Whereas children up to four years of age showed significantly increased levels from April to September, a significant decrease was seen in older children. The level of lead in soil at home, gender, smoking habits at home, and estimated level of hand-to-mouth activity did not appear as strong determinants of lead in blood. The results indicate that lead from mine waste in soil and dust fallout does not constitute a significant health hazard for preschool children in Falun.
PubMed ID
8367692 View in PubMed
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Cancer among potash workers in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155241
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2008 Sep;50(9):1035-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Punam Pahwa
Helen H McDuffie
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute of Health and Safety in Agriculture, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2008 Sep;50(9):1035-41
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Complex Mixtures - adverse effects
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Mining
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate what factors contribute to the increased risk of developing cancer among potash mine workers.
Data on 1434 male potash workers based on a nested case-control (
potash workers whose personal identifiers matched those of an individual registered with the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Controls: all other potash workers) study design were analyzed.
An occupational history of farming (RR [95% CI =]: 1.79 [1.26, 2.55]), presence of pleurisy at baseline [1.90 (1.07 to 3.40)], previous hard rock mining experience [1.74 (1.01 to 3.00)], and age statistically significantly elevated the risk of becoming a case. Smoking status was an effect modifier for the relationship between any respiratory disease at baseline and cancer.
Age; previous occupational history of farming and rock mining; interaction between any respiratory disease and smoking status were positively associated with the development of cancer.
Notes
Erratum In: J Occup Environ Med. 2009 Jul;51(7):858
PubMed ID
18784552 View in PubMed
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92 records – page 1 of 10.