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55 records – page 1 of 6.

[Aerogenic risk factors and diagnosis of bauxite pneumoconiosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112905
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
A O Peshkova
N A Roslaia
O F Roslyi
E I Likhacheva
A A Fedoruk
T V Slyshkina
E R Vagina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(1):15-8
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Aluminum Oxide - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - manpower - standards
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The research purpose is an estimation of influence of the bauxite dust on the state of the bronchopulmonary system of workers. It has been indicated that exposure of the poor fibrogenic dust while the process of the bauxite ore extraction, results in development of pnevmokoniosis characterized by substantial ventilatory and haemodynamic disorders limiting the workability of patients.
PubMed ID
23785803 View in PubMed
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[Benz(a)pyrene antibodies are a marker of carcinogenic load in coal-processing workers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96898
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):53-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Glushkov
E G Poleniuk
S A Mun
S A Larin
S F Zinchuk
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):53-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies - blood - immunology
Benzo(a)pyrene - metabolism
Carcinogens
Coal Mining
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Neoplasms - blood - immunology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Siberia
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood - immunology
Abstract
The authors studied benz(a)pyrene-specific secretory and serum antibody ratios (Ka) in 249 workers of the Kemerovo Power Station, by applying their modified enzyme immunoassay technique. There were 37 (20.5%) and 4 (5.8%) cases with Ka >2 at the preset immunoassay parameters of the 180 and 69 workers of mainline production and auxiliary units, respectively. A Ka value of >2 was found in 35 (21.6%) of the 162 males and only in 6 (6.9%) of the 87 females of the whole sample, in 29 (26.1%) of the 111 smokers and in 12 (8.7%) of the 138 non-smokers. The technique is proposed to study specific immune reactions and exposure to carcinogens primarily in workers of the enterprises processing coal and other types of fuel.
PubMed ID
20491270 View in PubMed
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[Bronchopulmonary diseases features in miners of Kolsky Transpolar area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150420
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(4):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
S A Siurin
A N Nikanov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(4):35-9
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Bronchial Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Copper - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Miners engaged into open-cast and underground extraction of copper-nickel ores in Kolsky Transpolar area have chronic bronchitis as a main nosologic entity among chronic bronchopulmonary diseases (19.1% of the workers). Considerably lower (4.0% of the workers) occurrence concerns chronic obstructive lung disease and bronchial asthma, both developed before the occupational involvement (1.3% of the workers). Complex of occupational and nonoccupational risk factors is connected mostly with smoking that increases COLD/CB risk 10.7-15.8-fold.
PubMed ID
19514169 View in PubMed
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Cancer among potash workers in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155241
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2008 Sep;50(9):1035-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Punam Pahwa
Helen H McDuffie
Author Affiliation
Canadian Institute of Health and Safety in Agriculture, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2008 Sep;50(9):1035-41
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Complex Mixtures - adverse effects
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Mining
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate what factors contribute to the increased risk of developing cancer among potash mine workers.
Data on 1434 male potash workers based on a nested case-control (
potash workers whose personal identifiers matched those of an individual registered with the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, Controls: all other potash workers) study design were analyzed.
An occupational history of farming (RR [95% CI =]: 1.79 [1.26, 2.55]), presence of pleurisy at baseline [1.90 (1.07 to 3.40)], previous hard rock mining experience [1.74 (1.01 to 3.00)], and age statistically significantly elevated the risk of becoming a case. Smoking status was an effect modifier for the relationship between any respiratory disease at baseline and cancer.
Age; previous occupational history of farming and rock mining; interaction between any respiratory disease and smoking status were positively associated with the development of cancer.
Notes
Erratum In: J Occup Environ Med. 2009 Jul;51(7):858
PubMed ID
18784552 View in PubMed
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Cancer occurrence among European mercury miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21128
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):591-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
P. Boffetta
M. Garcia-Gómez
V. Pompe-Kirn
D. Zaridze
T. Bellander
M. Bulbulyan
J D Caballero
F. Ceccarelli
D. Colin
T. Dizdarevic
S. Español
A. Kobal
N. Petrova
G. Sällsten
E. Merler
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Cancer Epidemiology, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. boffetta@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):591-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects
Mining
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the carcinogenicity of inorganic mercury in humans. METHODS: We studied the mortality from cancer among 6784 male and 265 female workers of four mercury mines and mills in Spain, Slovenia, Italy and the Ukraine. Workers were employed between the beginning of the century and 1990; the follow-up period lasted from the 1950s to the 1990s. We compared the mortality of the workers with national reference rates. RESULTS: Among men, there was no overall excess cancer mortality; an increase was observed in mortality from lung cancer (standardized mortality ratio [SMR] 1.19, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.38) and liver cancer (SMR 1.64, CI 1.18-2.22). The increase in lung cancer risk was restricted to workers from Slovenia and the Ukraine: no relationship was found with duration of employment or estimated mercu ry exposure. The increase in liver cancer risk was present both among miners and millers and was stronger in workers from Italy and Slovenia: there was a trend with estimated cumulative exposure but not with duration of employment, and the excess was not present in a parallel analysis of cancer incidence among workers from Slovenia. No increase was observed for other types of cancer, including brain and kidney tumours. Among female workers (Ukraine only), three deaths occurred from ovarian cancer, likely representing an excess. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to inorganic mercury in mines and mills does not seem strongly associated with cancer risk, with the possible exception of liver cancer; the increase in lung cancer may be explained by co-exposure to crystalline silica and radon.
PubMed ID
10189044 View in PubMed
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Carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners: possible aetiological factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225366
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1991 Dec;48(12):808-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
R A Kusiak
J. Springer
A C Ritchie
J. Muller
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1991 Dec;48(12):808-17
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology - mortality
Arsenic - adverse effects
Canada
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung - etiology - mortality
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - etiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Geological Phenomena
Geology
Gold
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Nickel
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Radon - adverse effects
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of 54,128 men who worked in Ontario mines was observed for mortality between 1955 and 1986. Most of these men worked in nickel, gold, or uranium mines; a few worked in silver, iron, lead/zinc, or other ore mines. If mortality that occurred after a man had started to mine uranium was excluded, an excess of carcinoma of the lung was found among the 13,603 Ontario gold miners in the study (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 129, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 115-145) and in men who began to mine nickel before 1936 (SMR 141, 95% CI 105-184). The excess mortality from lung cancer in the gold miners was confined to men who began gold mining before 1946. No increase in the mortality from carcinoma of the lung was evident in men who began mining gold after the end of 1945, in men who began mining nickel after 1936, or in men who mined ores other than gold, nickel, and uranium. In the gold mines each year of employment before the end of 1945 was associated with a 6.5% increase in mortality from lung cancer 20 or more years after the miner began working the mines (95% CI 1.6-11.4%); each year of employment before the end of 1945 in mines in which the host rock contained 0.1% arsenic was associated with a 3.1% increase in lung cancer 20 years or more after exposure began (95% CI 1.1-5.1%); and each working level month of exposure to radon decay products was associated with a 1.2% increase in mortality from lung cancer five or more years after exposure began (95% CI 0.02-2.4%). A comparison of two models shows that the excess of lung cancer mortality in Ontario gold miners is associated with exposure to high dust concentrations before 1946, with exposure to arsenic before 1946, and with exposure to radon decay products. No association between the increased incidence of carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners and exposure to mineral fibre could be detected. It is concluded that the excess of carcinoma of the lung in Ontario gold miners is probably due to exposure to arsenic and radon decay products.
Notes
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1988 Nov 2;80(17):1404-73172266
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1987;11(1):15-263028136
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1979 Aug;36(3):199-205315411
Cites: Cancer. 1977 Apr;39(4):1647-55192433
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1979 Nov;120(5):1025-9228572
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Cites: Cancer. 1981 Mar 1;47(5):1042-66261919
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Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1985;7(4):285-942986455
PubMed ID
1663386 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of occupational factors and the workers' health state in strip mining of tungsten and molybdenum ores].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197366
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(7):8-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A P Naumova
A G Chebotarev
T K Losik
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(7):8-14
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Molybdenum - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Russia - epidemiology
Tungsten - adverse effects
Abstract
Ores extraction in Tyrnaouz tungsten-molybdenum pool is conducted in specific climate and geologic conditions that considerably influence aimbient dust levels in open pit and mining workplaces, levels of exhaust, radioactive and explosive gases and lower those levels to the MACs or below. With regular mining equipment used, noise and vibration levels are the same as at other open pits. The stated occupational hazards could induce vibration disease and deafness in the workers.
PubMed ID
10974821 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.