Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Chrysotile, tremolite, and mesothelioma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215812
Source
Science. 1995 Feb 10;267(5199):776-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1995

[Diagnostic value of the determination of fatty acid spectrum of expired air condensate in the workers of coal stripping].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193776
Source
Gig Sanit. 2001 Mar-Apr;(2):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Khyshiktuev
M V Maksimenia
Source
Gig Sanit. 2001 Mar-Apr;(2):38-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breath Tests
Coal
Coal Mining
Dust - adverse effects
Fatty Acids - analysis
Female
Humans
Lipid Peroxidation
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Siberia
Time Factors
Abstract
The fatty acid spectrum of an expired air condensate was studied in the workers of the Kharanor coal stripping and in the dwellers of Chita (a control group). Regularities in the changes of the expired air fatty acid profile were assessed by the degree of exposure to coal dust and by the length of service. The findings indicated the relationship of profile changes with the degree of exposure to occupational noxious agents: the proportion of saturated fatty acids decreases much more significantly in workers who were directly exposed to the dust than in those were indirectly done. It is concluded that the fatty acid composition of an expired air condensate adequately reflects the changes occurring in the respiratory system upon exposure to dust.
PubMed ID
11494488 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diesel exhaust - an occupational carcinogen?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246534
Source
J Occup Med. 1980 Jan;22(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1980
Author
M B Schenker
Source
J Occup Med. 1980 Jan;22(1):41-6
Date
Jan-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benzopyrenes - poisoning
Carcinogens, Environmental
Finland
Fuel Oils
Humans
London
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Petroleum
Polycyclic Compounds - poisoning
Railroads
United States
Vehicle Emissions - poisoning
Abstract
The existence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the particulate phase of diesel engine exhaust has raised concern about a carcinogenic effect in workers exposed to exhaust from diesel engines. Some of the PAH are carcinogenic following inhalation by experimental animals and are associated with excess cancer mortality in some occupational exposures. Studies of occupational exposure to diesel exhaust show concentrations of PAH are above ambient levels but below the very high levels in occupations with demonstrated excess cancer mortality. A critical review of the epidemiologic evidence on the carcinogenicity of workplace exposure to diesel engine exhaust is suggestive of a carcinogenic effect but the existing data are sparse and contradictory. Further epidemiologic studies of this question are needed.
PubMed ID
6153403 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Effect of working conditions in deep coal mines of the Donetsk region on the course of ischemic heart disease in miners]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55402
Source
Kardiologiia. 1989 Aug;29(8):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
L T Malaia
V V Cherkesov
G P Kobets
R A Kopytina
Source
Kardiologiia. 1989 Aug;29(8):25-8
Date
Aug-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiac Complexes, Premature - etiology
Coal Mining - standards
Coronary Disease - complications - mortality
Death, Sudden - etiology
English Abstract
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Ukraine
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
Clinical and functional examination of the miners who suffered from coronary heart disease showed a higher ectopic activity of the myocardium during their work under underground conditions and during the subsequent 4 hours after its termination. It also indicated a significantly higher fatal cases of sudden coronary death in the miners in the aforementioned periods. To prevent the development of complications occurred in miners, the status of the cardiovascular system was proposed to be dynamically controlled.
PubMed ID
2479793 View in PubMed
Less detail

Etiology of pleural calcification: a study of Quebec chrysotile asbestos miners and millers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247417
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1979 Mar-Apr;34(2):76-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
G W Gibbs
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1979 Mar-Apr;34(2):76-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asbestos - adverse effects
Calcinosis - etiology - genetics
Dust
Environmental Exposure
Geography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupations
Pleural Diseases - etiology - genetics
Quebec
Abstract
A review of 15,689 chest radiographs of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers, representing the latest film prior to November 1, 1966, for all such persons ever x-rayed, identified 206 men with pleural calcification. Of these, 198 had worked in the Thetford Mines area, 6 at Asbestos, and 2 at St. Remi de Tingwick; 2.5%, 0.08%, and 1% of the films from these areas, respectively. A series of case-control studies revealed that pleural calcification was concentrated in men employed at a small group of mines in Thetford Mines and occurred more often among miners and maintenance personnel than among millers. Calcification was not related to past history of illness or injury, place of residence, or employment in other industries. The distribution of pleural calcification in this Quebec industry suggests that it is related to some characteristic of airborne dust or mineral closely associated with the chrysotile that is encountered during mining in Thetford Mines but not in other mining areas. Possible minerals include mica, talc, and breunnerite.
PubMed ID
434935 View in PubMed
Less detail

Extended workdays in an underground mine: a work performance analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218051
Source
Hum Factors. 1994 Jun;36(2):258-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
J C Duchon
C M Keran
T J Smith
Author Affiliation
Human Factors Research Group, U.S. Bureau of Mines, Twin Cities Research Center, Minneapolis, MN 55417.
Source
Hum Factors. 1994 Jun;36(2):258-68
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Ergometry
Fatigue - etiology
Humans
Male
Metals
Middle Aged
Mining
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology - psychology
Abstract
Many companies in different industrial sectors are exploring alternative work schedules to deal with diverse problems associated with shiftwork. The use of extended workday schedules (regular shift lengths exceeding 8 h with compressed workweeks) is attracting growing interest in many industries that use continuous operations. To address concerns regarding possible fatigue effects on safety and work performance associated with such schedules, the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a two-phase study at an underground metal mine in western Canada. Data were collected before and after a group of workers employed at the mine changed from an 8- to a 12-h schedule. Results indicate nearly unanimous acceptance and improved sleep quality associated with the new schedule. In general, fatigue-sensitive behavioral and physiological performance measures show either no change or improvement with 12-h shifts. We conclude that the extended workday schedule should be retained but periodically reevaluated.
PubMed ID
8070791 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hypertension risk factors in iron ore miners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231830
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(12):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
V N Kovalenko
V T Aronov
A M Vasilenko
A B Gurin
O A Volynets
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1989;(12):30-3
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Iron
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Risk factors
Russia
Abstract
An in-depth study of the prevalence of hypertonic disease among 3075 underground miners of Krivoi Rog iron-ore basin was carried out. The incidence of the disease was 11.3 +/- 0.6 percent. A correlative dependence between incidence of HD, age and length of work underground was found; there were also found differences in the incidence of HD among different occupational groups and occupations. A single-factor disperse analysis indicated that the proportion of seven identified risk factors for HD accounted for 22.0 percent. Under favourable and unfavourable combination of factors the risk of HD, as demonstrated by estimates made with the help of Bayes method, varied from 6.5 to 95.1 percent. Based on the calculated standard intensive indicators the groups of prognosis for HD were determined. Curative and health-promoting activities were conducted in sanatoria facilities among groups of special attention and unfavourable prognosis. The experience was summarized in methodical recommendations.
PubMed ID
2533705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interaction between underground mining and smoking in the causation of lung cancer: a study of nonuranium miners in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27094
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1982;5(4):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
L G Larsson
L. Damber
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1982;5(4):385-9
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
Combined effects of underground mining (nonuranium mines) and smoking were analyzed in a case-control study of male lung cancer in northern Sweden. Lung cancer cases exposed to underground mining had a considerably lower average cumulative tobacco consumption than other lung cancer cases, indicating that smoking is especially dangerous for underground miners. When relative risks were estimated, a synergistic effect of multiplicative type was found between smoking and underground mining.
PubMed ID
7182067 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.