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34 records – page 1 of 4.

[Ambient air pollution in naturally doped ore processing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194280
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):42-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001

Aquatic selenium pollution is a global environmental safety issue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75403
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2004 Sep;59(1):44-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
A Dennis Lemly
Author Affiliation
United States Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Coldwater Fisheries Research Unit, 1650 Ramble Road, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA. dlemly@vt.edu
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2004 Sep;59(1):44-56
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Coal Mining
Conservation of Natural Resources
Environment
Humans
Industrial Waste
Metallurgy
Mining
Power Plants
Risk Management
Selenium - analysis - toxicity
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Water Pollution - prevention & control
World Health
Abstract
Selenium pollution is a worldwide phenomenon and is associated with a broad spectrum of human activities, ranging from the most basic agricultural practices to the most high-tech industrial processes. Consequently, selenium contamination of aquatic habitats can take place in urban, suburban, and rural settings alike--from mountains to plains, from deserts to rainforests, and from the Arctic to the tropics. Human activities that increase waterborne concentrations of selenium are on the rise and the threat of widespread impacts to aquatic life is greater than ever before. Important sources of selenium contamination in aquatic habitats are often overlooked by environmental biologists and ecological risk assessors due to preoccupation with other, higher priority pollutants, yet selenium may pose the most serious long-term risk to aquatic habitats and fishery resources. Failure to include selenium in the list of constituents measured in contaminant screening/monitoring programs is a major mistake, both from the hazard assessment aspect and from the pollution control aspect. Once selenium contamination begins, a cascade of bioaccumulation events is set into motion which makes meaningful intervention nearly impossible. However, this cascade of events need not happen if adequate foresight and planning are exercised. Early evaluation and action are key. Prudent risk management based on environmentally sound hazard assessment and water quality goals can prevent biological impacts.
PubMed ID
15261722 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285596
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
M. Huvinen
E. Pukkala
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Metallurgy
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Respiration Disorders - chemically induced - mortality
Risk factors
Stainless Steel - adverse effects
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Although stainless steel has been produced for more than a hundred years, exposure-related mortality data for production workers are limited.
To describe cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel workers.
We studied Finnish stainless steel production chain workers employed between 1967 and 2004, from chromite mining to cold rolling of stainless steel, divided into sub-cohorts by production units with specific exposure patterns. We obtained causes of death for the years 1971-2012 from Statistics Finland. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) as ratios of observed and expected numbers of deaths based on population mortality rates of the same region.
Among 8088 workers studied, overall mortality was significantly decreased (SMR 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-0.84), largely due to low mortality from diseases of the circulatory system (SMR 0.71; 95% CI 0.61-0.81). In chromite mine, stainless steel melting shop and metallurgical laboratory workers, the SMR for circulatory disease was below 0.4 (SMR 0.33; 95% CI 0.07-0.95, SMR 0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.65 and SMR 0.16; 95% CI 0.00-0.90, respectively). Mortality from accidents (SMR 0.84; 95% CI 0.67-1.04) and suicides (SMR 0.72; 95% CI 0.56-0.91) was also lower than in the reference population.
Working in the Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel industry appears not to be associated with increased mortality.
Notes
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jan 6;109(1):71-714676145
Cites: BMJ. 2014;348:f741224452269
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Oct;32(5):830-714559760
Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Nov 19;3(11):e00381924253032
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2002 Jun;52(4):203-1212091586
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jan;47(1):14-92310703
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 May;37(2):121-77426462
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1990 Aug;47(8):537-432393634
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2000 Apr;73(3):171-8010787132
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1996 Nov;53(11):741-79038797
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1993 Mar;4(2):75-818386949
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Feb 1;356(5):447-5817267905
Comment In: Arch Environ Occup Health. 2016 Jul 3;71(4):187-827230506
PubMed ID
26655692 View in PubMed
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[Changes in the psychophysiological status of operational workers resulting from the occupational load]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46517
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(4):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
O S Goretskii
V A Maksimovich
V V Mukhin
V I Ostapenko
V I Prokopets
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(4):12-4
Date
1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Mining
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Metallurgy
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Selection
Psychophysiology
Reference Values
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology - psychology
Ukraine
Work - physiology - psychology
Abstract
The authors studied psychophysiologic state of operators in coal industry and metallurgy, who were considered healthy and suitable for the work. Only 60% of the examined metallurgy operators and 21% of those engaged into coal industry appeared to meet the occupational medical requirements. By the end of the working shift 50% of the operators showed decrease of attention and 28-36%--depression of visual and hearing memory. Occupational overload induced compromised psychophysiologic parameters in 70% of the examinees. Heating combined with other hazards resulted in marked asymmetry of heating sensation, changed body heating, lower hearing sensation, worse attention, memory, decision making, emotional state.
PubMed ID
7613774 View in PubMed
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[Comparative assessment of the clastogenic potential of various industrial enterprises]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52088
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Sep-Oct;(5):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
V G Druzhinin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Sep-Oct;(5):33-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Chemical Industry
Chromosome Aberrations
Comparative Study
Data Interpretation, Statistical
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Metaphase
Middle Aged
Mining
Mutagens
Occupational Exposure
Sex Factors
Siberia
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The paper comparatively assesses the level and qualitative spectrum of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in 192 workers engaged in 3 industries (cake and by-product, aluminum, and mining concentration processes). The maximum and minimum rates (6.43(+)-0.32% and 3.81(+)-0.46%) of CA have been observed in those engaged in cake and by-product and mining concentration processes, respectively. The combined influence of chemical and radiation factors are a cause of the higher rate of CA. Gender- and age-specific features do not effect on the level of structural CA. Smoking is a factor of their slight modification as there are no significant differences in the frequencies of aberrations between smokers and non-smokers in any professional group. There is an indirect relationship between the frequency of CA and the length of service, which may be different under the conditions of various industries.
PubMed ID
14598747 View in PubMed
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[Effect of vibration, noise, physical exertion and unfavorable microclimate on carbohydrate metabolism in workers engaged into mining industry and machine building].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257741
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2014;(7):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
I V Lapko
V A Kir'iakov
L I Antoshina
N A Pavlovskaia
S V Kondratovich
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2014;(7):32-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrate Metabolism - physiology
Humans
Metallurgy
Microclimate
Mining
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Physical Exertion
Russia
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
The authors studied influence of vibration, noise, physical overexertion and microclimate on carbohydrates metabolism and insulin resistance in metal mining industry workers. Findings are that vibration disease appeared to have maximal effect on insulin resistance test results and insulin level. The authors suggested biomarkers for early diagnosis of insulin resistance disorders in metal mining industry workers.
PubMed ID
25282800 View in PubMed
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[Experiences with silicosis control in Sweden during the last years].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255037
Source
Nord Hyg Tidskr. 1973;54(1):19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

[Geographic relations between death caused by cancer of the respiratory system and industrial employment data].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241595
Source
Union Med Can. 1983 Sep;112(9):777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983

Health concerns in uranium mining and milling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27184
Source
J Occup Med. 1981 Jul;23(7):502-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Author
V E Archer
Source
J Occup Med. 1981 Jul;23(7):502-5
Date
Jul-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Body Height
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Metallurgy
Mining
Radon
Smoking
Sweden
United States
Uranium
Abstract
Mortality of uranium miners from both lung cancer and other respiratory diseases is strongly dependent on exposure to radon daughters, cigarette smoking and height. Lung cancer among 15 different mining groups (uranium, iron, lead, zinc) was analyzed to determine what factors influence incidence and the induction-latent period. At low exposure or exposure rates, alpha radiation is more efficient in inducing lung cancer, producing an upward convex exposure-response curve. The induction-latent period is shortened by increased age at start of mining, by cigarette smoking and by high exposure rates. For a follow-up period of 20 to 25 years, the incidence increases with age at start of mining, with magnitude of exposure and with amount of cigarette smoking. Instead of extrapolating downward from high exposures to estimate risk at low levels, it is suggested that it might be more appropriate to use cancer rates associated with background radiation as the lowest point on the exposure-response curve. Although health risks are much greater in uranium mines than mills, there is some health risk in the mills from long-lived radioactive materials.
PubMed ID
7252612 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Hygienic characteristics of working conditions and state of adaptation in drivers of underground dump trucks at mines in the Kola polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235303
Source
Gig Sanit. 1987 May;(5):81-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987

34 records – page 1 of 4.