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34 records – page 1 of 4.

[A follow-up study registered, occupational skin diseases in an iron mine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244572
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1981
Author
A. Thörn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Date
Apr-15-1981
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Mining
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
6452559 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
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Arduousness of work, career, and disability pensioning of Finnish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241313
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1984;12(2):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
I. Kuorinka
M. Nurminen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1984;12(2):69-74
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disabled Persons
Finland
Humans
Iron
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations
Physical Exertion
Retirement
Statistics as Topic
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
The career and work arduousness of a population of retired iron ore miners and their contemporaries who continued to work were investigated to find out what aspects of work history were associated with disability pensioning. The retired group had entered the mining industry at a more advanced age than the referents. The retired miners had also started at more strenuous tasks. Later they changed to lighter tasks, but were less often promoted in their career. The risk of early retirement seems thus to be related to the essential indicators of one's progress in the mining vocation.
PubMed ID
6235578 View in PubMed
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[Clinical and morphologic characteristics of lung cancer in miners of Krivoy Rog iron-ore region and of uranium mines of Zhovti Vody.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80159
Source
Lik Sprava. 2004 Jan-Feb;(1):84-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bednaryk O M
Filipchenko L L
Pan'kova A O
Kryvoshei L O
Slinchenko M Z
Source
Lik Sprava. 2004 Jan-Feb;(1):84-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Humans
Iron
Lung - pathology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Uranium
Abstract
Clinical and morphological features of cancer were observed in two groups of miners (of Krivoy Rog iron-ore and Zholty Vody uranium mines), working in hazardous labour conditions. In both of groups the disease course had typical features for lung cancer. Roentgenologic changes were observed, central cancer of left and right lung was revealed by bronchoscopy method. In all the cases lung cancer was morphologically proved and classified as squamous. Rapid progression of the disease and late medical aid appealability cause the patients consulted with their doctors only at the stage of II-III, sometimes III of the disease and it makes a distinction of lung cancer in miners of iron-ore and uranium mines. In order to prevent such a late diagnostics all the miners should be referred to the group of risk on lung cancer.
PubMed ID
17051723 View in PubMed
Less detail

Combined effects of mining and smoking in the causation of lung carcinoma. A case-control study in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27129
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1982;21(5):305-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
L. Damber
L G Larsson
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1982;21(5):305-13
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air pollution, radioactive - analysis
Carcinoma, Small Cell - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Radon - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
Within a case-control study of male lung carcinoma in northern Sweden combined effects of underground mining (iron ore mines) and smoking were analysed. A synergistic effect was found approximately of multiplicative type. Cases with lung carcinoma exposed to underground mining had a considerably lower average cumulative tobacco consumption than other lung carcinoma cases as an expression of the fact that smoking is particularly dangerous in underground miners. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma was overrepresented among the cases exposed to underground mining and were especially often low tobacco consumers. In the 2 municipalities where the iron mines were located 74 per cent of the male lung carcinoma incidence could be explained by smoking and 55 per cent by underground mining (etiologic fractions).
PubMed ID
6297249 View in PubMed
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[Effectiveness of vibration damping of the work seats on open-pit power shovels in the Kursk magnetic anomaly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244096
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1981 Nov;(11):35-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1981

Exposure-response of silicosis mortality in Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86280
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2008 Jan;52(1):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Hedlund Ulf
Jonsson Håkan
Eriksson Kåre
Järvholm Bengt
Author Affiliation
Occupational Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. ulf.hedlund@envmed.umu.se
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2008 Jan;52(1):3-7
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Humans
Iron
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Silicosis - etiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the exposure-response relationship between exposure to quartz and fatal silicosis. METHODS: The mortality from silicosis in 7729 miners was analyzed and compared to their estimated exposure to respirable quartz. The miners had been working as a miner for at least 1 year between 1923 and 1996. Their mortality between 1952 and 2001 was studied by using information from the national cause of death register. Both underlying and contributing causes of death were considered in the analysis. The exposure to quartz was estimated from job titles and using 3239 measurements of personal exposure to respirable quartz from 1965 to 1999. The mortality rates were adjusted to attained age and years of birth using a Poisson regression. RESULTS: The median cumulative exposure among the 7729 miners was 0.9 mg x years m(-3). There were 58 deaths from silicosis. Their median cumulative exposure was 4.8 mg x years m(-3). The crude mortality rate was 53 cases per 100,000 person-years with an exposure-response relationship. CONCLUSION: There seems to be an increased risk of fatal silicosis at exposure levels around 3 mg x years m(-3) for respirable quartz.
PubMed ID
18063590 View in PubMed
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Fifty-year follow-up of mortality among a cohort of iron-ore miners in Sweden, with specific reference to myocardial infarction mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91204
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2009 Apr;66(4):264-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Björ B.
Burström L.
Jonsson H.
Nathanaelsson L.
Damber L.
Nilsson T.
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. bodil.bjor@envmed.umu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2009 Apr;66(4):264-8
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death - trends
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Poisoning - mortality
Respiration Disorders - mortality
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study investigates both general mortality and mortality from myocardial infarction among men employed in iron-ore mines in Sweden. METHODS: The mortality of employees (surface and underground workers) at the iron-ore mines in Malmberget and Kiruna, Sweden was investigated. The study cohort comprised men who had been employed for at least 1 year between 1923 and 1996. The causes of death were obtained from the national cause of death register from 1952 to 2001. Indirect standardised mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated for four main causes. Mortality specifically from myocardial infarction was also analysed. RESULTS: 4504 deaths in the cohort gave an SMR for total mortality of 1.05 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.09). Mortality was significantly higher for lung cancer (SMR 1.73, 95% CI 1.52 to 1.97). There was an increased risk of injuries and poisonings (SMR 1.34, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.46) and respiratory diseases (SMR 1.14, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.28). There were 1477 cases of myocardial infarction, resulting in an SMR of 1.12 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.18). SMR was higher (1.35, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.50) for men aged 60 years of age (1.06, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.13). CONCLUSIONS: Mortality from myocardial infarction was higher than expected. There was also an increased risk of death from injuries and poisonings, lung cancer and respiratory diseases, as well as higher general mortality. Our findings support the results of previous studies that there is an association between working in the mining industry and adverse health outcomes.
PubMed ID
19017687 View in PubMed
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Follow-up study of pulmonary function and respiratory tract symptoms in workers in a Swedish iron ore mine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67970
Source
J Occup Med. 1988 Dec;30(12):953-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
H S Jörgensen
B. Kolmodin-Hedman
N. Stjernberg
Author Affiliation
LKAB, Medical Department, Kiruna, Sweden.
Source
J Occup Med. 1988 Dec;30(12):953-8
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bronchitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Cough - diagnosis - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Mucociliary Clearance
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
In 1967, 240 workers in the Kiruna, Sweden, mine were examined with regard to lung function and respiratory symptoms. Seventeen years later, 167 of these workers were reexamined using a structured interview which covered respiratory symptoms, smoking habits, and workplace, and lung function tests, including dynamic spirometry and closing volume. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis in the present study was 9.6%. There was a strong relationship between chronic bronchitis and smoking but no relationship between chronic bronchitis and working underground in the mine. Only three persons had chronic obstructive lung disease. In the still active mine workers, dynamic spirometry results showed no difference between smokers or nonsmokers or between underground and surface workers. Thus, we found no excess of chronic obstructive lung disease or lung function disturbances in the mine workers studied. This probably reflects a self-selection process whereby the workers with airway obstruction due to smoking or underground exposure have left underground work and also the company. Underground workers with chronic mucous hypersecretion, on the other hand, have not felt motivated, because of this, to leave underground work. Some, however, may have stopped smoking but not necessarily because of the hypersecretion.
PubMed ID
3230447 View in PubMed
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.