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35 records – page 1 of 4.

The age-related risk of occupational accidents: the case of Swedish iron-ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211973
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
E. Menckel
L. Lundholm
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The paper examines age-related accident risks faced by Swedish male iron-ore miners. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of national registers was conducted over a ten-year period using three times periods of five years and five age categories. Age-related accident frequency, characteristics and severity were examined. High accident ratios were rare among older miners whatever the time period, but some accident patterns became substantially more frequent in some older age cohorts over the years. Injuries tended to be more severe in older age groups, all accidents aggregated as well as by accident pattern. It is concluded that inequality in risk exposure between age groups may explain the lower accident ratios found among older workers, but also that the aging of a working population may lead to the application of task-assignment principles that penalize older workers, at least with regard to certain specific accident risks.
PubMed ID
8799439 View in PubMed
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An ecological study of cancer incidence in Port Hope, Ontario from 1992 to 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117206
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2013 Mar;33(1):227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jing Chen
Deborah Moir
Rachel Lane
Patsy Thompson
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 2720 Riverside Drive, Ottawa, K1A 0K9, Canada. jing.chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2013 Mar;33(1):227-42
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Radium - analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
A plant processing radium and uranium ores has been operating in the town of Port Hope since 1932. Given the nuclear industry located in the community and ongoing public health concerns, cancer incidence rates in Port Hope were studied for a recent 16 year period (1992-2007) for continued periodic cancer incidence surveillance of the community. The cancer incidence in the local community for all cancers combined was similar to the Ontario population, health regions with similar socio-economic characteristics in Ontario and in Canada, and the Canadian population. No statistically significant differences in childhood cancer, leukaemia or other radiosensitive cancer incidence were observed, with the exception of statistically significant elevated lung cancer incidence among women. However, the statistical significance was reduced or disappeared when the comparison was made to populations with similar socio-economic characteristics. These findings are consistent with previous ecological, case-control and cohort studies conducted in Port Hope, environmental assessments, and epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere on populations living around similar facilities or exposed to similar environmental contaminants. Although the current study covered an extended period of time, the power to detect risk at the sub-regional level of analysis was limited since the Port Hope population is small (16,500). The study nevertheless indicated that large differences in cancer incidence are not occurring in Port Hope compared to other similar communities and the general population.
PubMed ID
23324463 View in PubMed
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[Biologic markers for early diagnosis of effects caused by exposure to coal dust in miners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118928
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(9):36-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N A Pavlovskaia
O P Rushkevich
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(9):36-42
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - analysis
Coal
Coal Mining
Dust
Early Diagnosis
Humans
Incidence
Male
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Respiration Disorders - chemically induced - diagnosis - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors studied changes in several laboratory values of coal miners in Russian Federation, defined information value of these changes and suggested complex of methods for early preclinical diagnosis of negative effects caused by coal dust in the miners. Dust-related respiratory diseases were proved to develop by stages on molecular level.
PubMed ID
23156063 View in PubMed
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Clinical measures, smoking, radon exposure, and risk of lung cancer in uranium miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210925
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Oct;53(10):697-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Oct;53(10):697-702
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Radon - adverse effects
Regression Analysis
Silicosis - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Uranium
Abstract
Exposure to the radioactive daughters of radon is associated with increased risk of lung cancer in mining populations. An investigation of incidence of lung cancer following a clinical survey of Ontario uranium miners was undertaken to explore whether risk associated with radon is modified by factors including smoking, radiographic silicosis, clinical symptoms, the results of lung function testing, and the temporal pattern of radon exposure.
Miners were examined in 1974 by a respiratory questionnaire, tests of lung function, and chest radiography. A random selection of 733 (75%) of the original 973 participants was followed up by linkage to the Ontario Mortality and Cancer Registries.
Incidence of lung cancer was increased threefold. Risk of lung cancer among miners who had stopped smoking was half that of men who continued to smoke. There was no interaction between smoking and radon exposure. Men with lung function test results consistent with airways obstruction had an increased risk of lung cancer, even after adjustment for cigarette smoking. There was no association between radiographic silicosis and risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer was associated with exposures to radon daughters accumulated in a time window four to 14 years before diagnosis, but there was little association with exposures incurred earlier than 14 years before diagnosis. Among the men diagnosed with lung cancer, the mean and median dose rates were 2.6 working level months (WLM) a year and 1.8 WLM/year in the four to 14 year exposure window.
Risk of lung cancer associated with radon is modified by dose and time from exposure. Risk can be substantially decreased by stopping smoking.
Notes
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Sep;27(9):644-504045575
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Mar;15(1):134-73754239
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1990 Jan 15;45(1):26-332404878
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;132(2):265-742372006
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991 Aug;144(2):307-111859052
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Jan 1;152(1):37-437804920
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1993 Oct;50(10):920-88217852
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Aug 15;140(4):323-328059767
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Aug 15;140(4):333-98059768
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Oct 8;309(6959):901-117755693
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993 Mar 17;85(6):422-38445662
PubMed ID
8943835 View in PubMed
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Environmental factors in an Ontario community with disparities in colorectal cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104417
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2014 May;6(3):175-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Jeavana Sritharan
Rishikesan Kamaleswaran
Ken McFarlan
Manon Lemonde
Clemon George
Otto Sanchez
Author Affiliation
University of Ontario Institute of Technology. jeavana.sritharan@mail.utoronto.ca.
Source
Glob J Health Sci. 2014 May;6(3):175-85
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Ontario - epidemiology
Pesticides
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
In Ontario, there are significant geographical disparities in colorectal cancer incidence. In particular, the northern region of Timiskaming has the highest incidence of colorectal cancer in Ontario while the southern region of Peel displays the lowest. We aimed to identify non-nutritional modifiable environmental factors in Timiskaming that may be associated with its diverging colorectal cancer incidence rates when compared to Peel.
We performed a systematic review to identify established and proposed environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer incidence, created an assessment questionnaire tool regarding these environmental exposures, and applied this questionnaire among 114 participants from the communities of Timiskaming and Peel.
We found that tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, residential use of organochlorine pesticides, and potential exposure to toxic metals were dominant factors among Timiskaming respondents. We found significant differences regarding active smoking, chronic alcohol use, reported indoor and outdoor household pesticide use, and gold and silver mining in the Timiskaming region.
This study, the first to assess environmental factors in the Timiskaming community, identified higher reported exposures to tobacco, alcohol, pesticides, and mining in Timiskaming when compared with Peel. These significant findings highlight the need for specific public health assessments and interventions regarding community environmental exposures.
PubMed ID
24762360 View in PubMed
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[Formation and structural features of morbidity in miners with professional pathology of the peripheral nervous system and the musculoskeletal system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258112
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 May-Jun;(3):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L N Shpagina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 May-Jun;(3):37-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Mining
Humans
Incidence
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
There were studied polypathy rates, their relationship with the professional pathology in Kuzbass miners. There was performed the analysis of an array of more than 2000 patients with occupational pathology and also 1800 records from for the coal miners hospitals for patients with no signs of occupational diseases. The rise in morbidity rate of polypathies was turned out to be associated with a very low proportion (less than 20%) of patients' preventive visits. It is advisable to introduce the financial incentives for doctors share for the rise of the number of healthy individuals in the enterprise, for detection rate of chronic general and occupational diseases at the early stages of the disease and for reducing of incidence of polypathies.
PubMed ID
25306698 View in PubMed
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[Genotoxic effects of occupational environment in Kuzbass miners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266611
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2015;(5):4-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
V I Minina
Iu E Kulemin
T A Tolotchko
A V Meier
Ia A Savtchenko
V P Volobaev
N I Gafarov
M V Semenikhina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2015;(5):4-8
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chromosome Aberrations - chemically induced
Coal Mining
DNA Damage - drug effects
Dust
Humans
Incidence
Lymphocytes - drug effects
Male
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors studied chromosomal aberrations in blood lymphocytes of 100 miners in coal mines of Kuznetsk coal field, with underground length of service over 15 years. Reference data were collected by cytogenetic analysis in a group of workers with long length of service in Kemerovo thermal power plant, contacting coal dust (n = 104) and in healthy males of the same age group, residents of Kemerovo city, without occupational contact with mutagenes (n = 194). The miners appeared to have maximal frequency of structural chromosomal injuries--5.37%. In the workers of thermal power plant, this value was considerably lower than in the miners (4.23%; p
PubMed ID
26336726 View in PubMed
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[Hemostasis disorders in coal miners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147613
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(9):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
S N Filimonov
V V Zakharenkov
N I Panev
A V Burdein
L A Danilevskaia
N N Epifantseva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(9):22-5
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Coagulation Disorders - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Coal Mining
Hemostasis - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Findings are that coal miners having long contact with vibration instruments and coal dust develop endothelial dysfunction, increased platelets aggregation, hypercoagulation and lower anticoagulation activity. The hemostasis disorders revealed could result in earlier coronary atherosclerosis development in workers exposed to vibration.
PubMed ID
19882776 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.