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33 records – page 1 of 4.

[A follow-up study registered, occupational skin diseases in an iron mine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244572
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1981
Author
A. Thörn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Date
Apr-15-1981
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Mining
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
6452559 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Feb;13(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987
Author
R S Koskela
M. Klockars
E. Järvinen
P J Kolari
A. Rossi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Feb;13(1):26-31
Date
Feb-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Respiration Disorders - etiology - mortality
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to investigate the cancer mortality of granite workers. The study comprised 1,026 workers hired between 1940 and 1971. The number of person-years was 20,165, and the number of deaths 235. During the total follow-up 46 tumors were observed and 44.9 were expected. An excess mortality from tumors was observed for the workers followed for 20 years or more, the greatest excess occurring during the follow-up period of 25-29 years (observed 11, expected 5.2). Of the 46 tumors, 22 were lung cancers (expected 17.1) and 15 were gastrointestinal cancers (expected 9.7), nine of which were cancers of the stomach (expected 6.0). Mortality from lung cancer was excessive for workers with at least 15 years since entry into granite work (latency) (21 observed and 9.5 expected), being highest during the follow-up period of 25-29 years (observed 8, expected 2.1). The results indicate that granite exposure per se may be an etiologic factor in the initiation or promotion of malignant neoplasms.
PubMed ID
3033818 View in PubMed
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Cancer occurrence among European mercury miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21128
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):591-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
P. Boffetta
M. Garcia-Gómez
V. Pompe-Kirn
D. Zaridze
T. Bellander
M. Bulbulyan
J D Caballero
F. Ceccarelli
D. Colin
T. Dizdarevic
S. Español
A. Kobal
N. Petrova
G. Sällsten
E. Merler
Author Affiliation
Unit of Environmental Cancer Epidemiology, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. boffetta@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1998 Dec;9(6):591-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mercury - adverse effects
Mining
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the carcinogenicity of inorganic mercury in humans. METHODS: We studied the mortality from cancer among 6784 male and 265 female workers of four mercury mines and mills in Spain, Slovenia, Italy and the Ukraine. Workers were employed between the beginning of the century and 1990; the follow-up period lasted from the 1950s to the 1990s. We compared the mortality of the workers with national reference rates. RESULTS: Among men, there was no overall excess cancer mortality; an increase was observed in mortality from lung cancer (standardized mortality ratio [SMR] 1.19, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.38) and liver cancer (SMR 1.64, CI 1.18-2.22). The increase in lung cancer risk was restricted to workers from Slovenia and the Ukraine: no relationship was found with duration of employment or estimated mercu ry exposure. The increase in liver cancer risk was present both among miners and millers and was stronger in workers from Italy and Slovenia: there was a trend with estimated cumulative exposure but not with duration of employment, and the excess was not present in a parallel analysis of cancer incidence among workers from Slovenia. No increase was observed for other types of cancer, including brain and kidney tumours. Among female workers (Ukraine only), three deaths occurred from ovarian cancer, likely representing an excess. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to inorganic mercury in mines and mills does not seem strongly associated with cancer risk, with the possible exception of liver cancer; the increase in lung cancer may be explained by co-exposure to crystalline silica and radon.
PubMed ID
10189044 View in PubMed
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[Case-control study of lung cancer and combined home and work radon exposure in the town of Lermontov].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126504
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):705-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
O A Pakholkina
M V Zhukovskii
I V Iarmoshenko
V L Lezhnin
S P Vereiko
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2011 Nov-Dec;51(6):705-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Alpha Particles
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Radon - adverse effects
Russia
Uranium - adverse effects
Abstract
Relation between the risk of lung cancer and combined home and work indoor radon exposure was studied on the example of the population of Lermontov town (Stavropol Region, Russia). The town is situated in the former uranium mining area. Case (121 lung cancer cases) and control (196 individuals free of lung cancer diagnosis) groups of the study included both ex-miners and individuals that were not involved in the uranium industry. Home and work radon exposures were estimated using archive data as well as contemporary indoor measurements. The results of our study support the conclusion about the effect of radon exposure on the lung cancer morbidity.
PubMed ID
22384722 View in PubMed
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Cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel production workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285596
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
M. Huvinen
E. Pukkala
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2016 Apr;66(3):241-6
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death
Chromium Alloys - adverse effects
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Metallurgy
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Respiration Disorders - chemically induced - mortality
Risk factors
Stainless Steel - adverse effects
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Although stainless steel has been produced for more than a hundred years, exposure-related mortality data for production workers are limited.
To describe cause-specific mortality in Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel workers.
We studied Finnish stainless steel production chain workers employed between 1967 and 2004, from chromite mining to cold rolling of stainless steel, divided into sub-cohorts by production units with specific exposure patterns. We obtained causes of death for the years 1971-2012 from Statistics Finland. We calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) as ratios of observed and expected numbers of deaths based on population mortality rates of the same region.
Among 8088 workers studied, overall mortality was significantly decreased (SMR 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-0.84), largely due to low mortality from diseases of the circulatory system (SMR 0.71; 95% CI 0.61-0.81). In chromite mine, stainless steel melting shop and metallurgical laboratory workers, the SMR for circulatory disease was below 0.4 (SMR 0.33; 95% CI 0.07-0.95, SMR 0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.65 and SMR 0.16; 95% CI 0.00-0.90, respectively). Mortality from accidents (SMR 0.84; 95% CI 0.67-1.04) and suicides (SMR 0.72; 95% CI 0.56-0.91) was also lower than in the reference population.
Working in the Finnish ferrochromium and stainless steel industry appears not to be associated with increased mortality.
Notes
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Jan 6;109(1):71-714676145
Cites: BMJ. 2014;348:f741224452269
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Oct;32(5):830-714559760
Cites: BMJ Open. 2013 Nov 19;3(11):e00381924253032
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2002 Jun;52(4):203-1212091586
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jan;47(1):14-92310703
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 May;37(2):121-77426462
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1990 Aug;47(8):537-432393634
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2000 Apr;73(3):171-8010787132
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1996 Nov;53(11):741-79038797
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1993 Mar;4(2):75-818386949
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Feb 1;356(5):447-5817267905
Comment In: Arch Environ Occup Health. 2016 Jul 3;71(4):187-827230506
PubMed ID
26655692 View in PubMed
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Characterization of occupational exposure to air contaminants in modern tunnelling operations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267836
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2014 Aug;58(7):818-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Berit Bakke
Bente Ulvestad
Yngvar Thomassen
Torill Woldbaek
Dag G Ellingsen
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2014 Aug;58(7):818-29
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerosols - analysis
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Carbon - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Likelihood Functions
Mining
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Quartz - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Workplace
Abstract
Personal air measurements of aerosols and gases among tunnel construction workers were performed as part of a 11-day follow-up study on the relationship between exposure to aerosols and gases and cardiovascular and respiratory effects.
Ninety tunnel construction workers employed at 11 available construction sites participated in the exposure study. The workers were divided into seven job groups according to tasks performed. Exposure measurements were carried out on 2 consecutive working days prior to the day of health examination. Summary statistics were computed using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), and the procedure NLMIXED and LIFEREG in SAS was used to perform MLE for repeated measures data subject to left censoring and for calculation of within- and between-worker variance components.
The geometric mean (GM) air concentrations for the thoracic mass aerosol sub-fraction, a-quartz, oil mist, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) for all workers were 561, 63, 210, 146, and 35.2 µg m(-3), respectively. Statistical differences of air concentrations between job groups were observed for all contaminants, except for OC, EC, and ammonia (P > 0.05). The shaft drillers, injection workers, and shotcreting operators were exposed to the highest GM levels of thoracic dust (7061, 1087, and 865 µg m(-) (3), respectively). The shaft drillers and the support workers were exposed to the highest GM levels of a-quartz (GM = 844 and 118 µg m(-3), respectively). Overall, the exposure to nitrogen dioxide and ammonia was low (GM = 120 and 251 µg m(-) (3), respectively).
Findings from this study show significant differences between job groups with shaft drilling as the highest exposed job to air concentrations for all measured contaminants. Technical interventions in this job should be implemented to reduce exposure levels. Overall, diesel exhaust air concentrations seem to be lower than previously assessed (as EC).
PubMed ID
24902863 View in PubMed
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Clinical and laboratory features of acute sulfur dioxide inhalation poisoning: two-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231309
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Feb;139(2):556-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
Author
S. Rabinovitch
N D Greyson
W. Weiser
V. Hoffstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Toronto, St. Michael's Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1989 Feb;139(2):556-8
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Acute Disease
Adult
Blast Injuries - diagnosis
Burns, Chemical - diagnosis
Burns, Inhalation - diagnosis
Canada
Copper
Explosions
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung - drug effects - physiopathology
Lung Injury
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - diagnosis - physiopathology
Sulfur Dioxide - poisoning
Abstract
We present clinical and laboratory results (including nuclear imaging) obtained over a period of two years in two nonsmoking miners who were exposed to high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) after a mine explosion. Within 3 wk of the accident, both miners had evidence of severe airways obstruction, hypoxemia, markedly reduced exercise tolerance, ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and evidence of active inflammation as documented by positive gallium lung scan. Serial ventilation-perfusion scans over the first 12 months showed progressive improvement without returning to normal. After the initial recovery, there has been no significant change over the subsequent two years postinjury. Pulmonary function and exercise tests also displayed a similar pattern of initial improvement. We conclude that (1) acute exposure to high concentrations of SO2 results in severe airways obstruction, (2) pulmonary function abnormalities are partially reversible, and (3) most of the improvement occurs within 12 months after the initial injury.
PubMed ID
2913900 View in PubMed
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[Clinical course of pneumoconiosis after exposure to dust evaluated by the results of ambulatory follow-up].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224848
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1992;(6):17-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
N I Savvaitova
E I Finkel'berg
E L Vinogradova
L Ia Pikus
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1992;(6):17-9
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Ambulatory Care
Anthracosilicosis - etiology - therapy
Ceramics
Coal Mining
Combined Modality Therapy
Dust - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Quartz - adverse effects
Russia
Silicosis - etiology - therapy
Silicotuberculosis - etiology - therapy
Welding
Abstract
Results of follow-up and treatment of different pneumoconiosis types in 749 patients are represented. Rational employment combined with individualized treatment stabilize pneumoconiosis in 80.5% of cases with interstitial silicosis, in those with silico - silicosis --85.5% the nodular form in 70.5% and 77.8% of cases respectively. In the patients with the first symptoms of silicotuberculosisis the interstitial and nodular forms of the process stabilized in more than 50% of cases and in more than 60% of silico - silicatosis cases. Active interstitial tuberculosis was revealed in 7.3% of cases, nodular one--in 16.2%. The course of the macronodular pneumoconiosis in 50.2% of cases was unfavourable. 23.2% of patients with pneumoconiosis caused by electric-welding aerosol showed regress of pneumoconiosis in afterdust period.
PubMed ID
1478517 View in PubMed
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Data mining: comparing the empiric CFS to the Canadian ME/CFS case definition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132382
Source
J Clin Psychol. 2012 Jan;68(1):41-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Leonard A Jason
Beth Skendrovic
Jacob Furst
Abigail Brown
Angela Weng
Christine Bronikowski
Author Affiliation
DePaul University, USA. Ljason@depaul.edu
Source
J Clin Psychol. 2012 Jan;68(1):41-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chicago
Chronic Disease
Data Mining - methods
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Fatigue - diagnosis
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - diagnosis
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Risk
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This article contrasts two case definitions for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We compared the empiric CFS case definition (Reeves et al., 2005) and the Canadian ME/CFS clinical case definition (Carruthers et al., 2003) with a sample of individuals with CFS versus those without. Data mining with decision trees was used to identify the best items to identify patients with CFS. Data mining is a statistical technique that was used to help determine which of the survey questions were most effective for accurately classifying cases. The empiric criteria identified about 79% of patients with CFS and the Canadian criteria identified 87% of patients. Items identified by the Canadian criteria had more construct validity. The implications of these findings are discussed.
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2003 Jul 14;163(13):1530-612860574
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2003 Dec 31;3(1):2514702202
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1991 Jan-Feb;13 Suppl 1:S8-112020806
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1994 Dec 15;121(12):953-97978722
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1995 Apr;39(3):315-257636775
Cites: Am J Med. 1996 Jan;100(1):56-648579088
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1999 Oct 11;159(18):2129-3710527290
Cites: BMC Med. 2005;3:1916356178
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2006;13(3):244-5117078775
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(7):589-9820617920
Cites: J Health Psychol. 2011 Apr;16(3):445-5621224330
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2001 Mar;66(1):51-711368410
PubMed ID
21823124 View in PubMed
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Dust exposure and mortality in chrysotile mining, 1910-75.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246109
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1980 Feb;37(1):11-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980
Author
J C McDonald
F D Liddell
G W Gibbs
G E Eyssen
A D McDonald
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1980 Feb;37(1):11-24
Date
Feb-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Dust
Employment
Environmental Exposure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Quebec
Respiration Disorders - mortality
Smoking - complications
Time Factors
Abstract
We report a further follow-up of a birth cohort of 11 379 workers exposed to chrysotile. The cohort consisted of 10 939 men and 440 women, born 1891-1920, who had worked for at least a month in the mines and mills of Asbestos and Thetford Mines in Quebec. For all subjects, length of service and estimates of accumulated dust exposure were obtained, with a smoking history for the vast majority. Three methods of analysis, two based on the "man-years" methods, the other a "case-and-multiple-controls" approach, gave results consistent with one another and with previous analyses. By the end of 1975, 4463 men and 84 women had died. Among men, the overall excess mortality, 1926-75 was 2% at Asbestos and 10% at Thetford Mines, much the dustier region. The women, mostly employed at Asbestos, had a standardised mortality ratio (SMR) all causes, 1936-75) of 0.90. Analysis of deaths 20 years or more after first employment showed that in men with short service (less than five years) there was no discernible correlation with dust exposure. Among men employed at least 20 years, there were clear excesses in those exposed to the heaviest dust concentrations. Reanalysis in terms of exposure to age 45 showed definite and consistent trends for SMRs for total mortality, for lung cancer, and for pneumoconiosis to be higher the heavier the exposure. The response to increasing dose was effectively linear for lung cancer and for pneumoconiosis. Lung cancer deaths occurred in non-smokers, and showed a greater increase of incidence with increasing exposure than did lung cancer in smokers, but there was insufficient evidence to distinguish between multiplicative and additive risk models. There were no excess deaths from laryngeal cancer, but a clear association with smoking. Ten men and one woman died from pleural mesothelioma. If the only subjects studied had been the 1904 men with at least 20 years' employment in the lower dust concentrations, averaging 6.6 million particles per cubic foot (or about 20 fibres/cc), excess mortality would not have been considered statistically significant, except for pneumoconiosis. The inability of such a large epidemiological survey to detect increased risk at what, today, are considered unacceptable dust concentrations, and the consequent importance of exposure-response models are therefore emphasised.
Notes
Cites: Biometrics. 1969 Jun;25(2):339-555794104
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1971 Jun;22(6):677-865574010
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1972 Mar;24(3):189-975059627
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1974 Feb;28(2):61-84809914
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1974 Feb;28(2):69-714809915
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1975 May;30(5):266-71130842
Cites: Br J Prev Soc Med. 1976 Dec;30(4):225-301009272
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Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1964 Oct;21:304-714253230
PubMed ID
7370189 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.