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Analysing factors related to slipping, stumbling, and falling accidents at work: Application of data mining methods to Finnish occupational accidents and diseases statistics database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121789
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):215-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Noora Nenonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Industrial Management, Center for Safety Management and Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. noora.nenonen@tut.fi
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):215-24
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Data Mining
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Workplace
Wounds and Injuries - etiology
Abstract
The utilisation of data mining methods has become common in many fields. In occupational accident analysis, however, these methods are still rarely exploited. This study applies methods of data mining (decision tree and association rules) to the Finnish national occupational accidents and diseases statistics database to analyse factors related to slipping, stumbling, and falling (SSF) accidents at work from 2006 to 2007. SSF accidents at work constitute a large proportion (22%) of all accidents at work in Finland. In addition, they are more likely to result in longer periods of incapacity for work than other workplace accidents. The most important factor influencing whether or not an accident at work is related to SSF is the specific physical activity of movement. In addition, the risk of SSF accidents at work seems to depend on the occupation and the age of the worker. The results were in line with previous research. Hence the application of data mining methods was considered successful. The results did not reveal anything unexpected though. Nevertheless, because of the capability to illustrate a large dataset and relationships between variables easily, data mining methods were seen as a useful supplementary method in analysing occupational accident data.
PubMed ID
22877702 View in PubMed
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Arduousness of work, career, and disability pensioning of Finnish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241313
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1984;12(2):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
I. Kuorinka
M. Nurminen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1984;12(2):69-74
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disabled Persons
Finland
Humans
Iron
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations
Physical Exertion
Retirement
Statistics as Topic
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
The career and work arduousness of a population of retired iron ore miners and their contemporaries who continued to work were investigated to find out what aspects of work history were associated with disability pensioning. The retired group had entered the mining industry at a more advanced age than the referents. The retired miners had also started at more strenuous tasks. Later they changed to lighter tasks, but were less often promoted in their career. The risk of early retirement seems thus to be related to the essential indicators of one's progress in the mining vocation.
PubMed ID
6235578 View in PubMed
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Arsenic, antimony, and nickel leaching from northern peatlands treating mining influenced water in cold climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298194
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Mar 20; 657:1161-1172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-20-2019
Author
Uzair Akbar Khan
Katharina Kujala
Soile P Nieminen
Marja Liisa Räisänen
Anna-Kaisa Ronkanen
Author Affiliation
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Unit, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4300, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: uzair.khan@oulu.fi.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Mar 20; 657:1161-1172
Date
Mar-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Antimony - analysis
Arctic Regions
Arsenic - analysis
Finland
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Mining
Nickel - analysis
Oxygen - analysis
Soil - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Increased metal mining in the Arctic region has caused elevated loads of arsenic (As), antimony (Sb), nickel (Ni), and sulfate (SO42-) to recipient surface or groundwater systems. The need for cost-effective active and passive mine water treatment methods has also increased. Natural peatlands are commonly used as a final step for treatment of mining influenced water. However, their permanent retention of harmful substances is affected by influent concentrations and environmental conditions. The effects of dilution, pH, temperature, oxygen availability, and contaminant accumulation on retention and leaching of As, Sb, Ni, and sulfate from mine process water and drainage water obtained from treatment peatlands in Finnish Lapland were studied in batch sorption experiments, and discussed in context of field data and environmental impacts. The results, while demonstrating effectiveness of peat to remove the target contaminants from mine water, revealed the risk of leaching of As, Sb, and SO42- from treatment peatlands when diluted mine water was introduced. Sb was more readily leached compared to As while leaching of both was supported by higher pH of 9. No straightforward effect of temperature and oxygen availability in controlling removal and leaching was evident from the results. The results also showed that contaminant accumulation in treatment peatlands after long-term use can lead to decreased removal and escalated leaching of contaminants, with the effect being more pronounced for As and Ni.
PubMed ID
30677883 View in PubMed
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Assessing ecotoxicity of biomining effluents in stream ecosystems by in situ invertebrate bioassays: A case study in Talvivaara, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284211
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Jan;36(1):147-155
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Johanna Salmelin
Matti T Leppänen
Anna K Karjalainen
Kari-Matti Vuori
Almut Gerhardt
Heikki Hämäläinen
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Jan;36(1):147-155
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Biological Assay
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Insects
Mining
Oligochaeta - drug effects
Rivers - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Mining of sulfide-rich pyritic ores produces acid mine drainage waters and has induced major ecological problems in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Biomining utilizes microbes to extract metals from the ore, and it has been suggested as a new sustainable way to produce metals. However, little is known of the potential ecotoxicological effects of biomining. In the present study, biomining impacts were assessed using survival and behavioral responses of aquatic macroinvertebrates at in situ exposures in streams. The authors used an impedance conversion technique to measure quantitatively in situ behavioral responses of larvae of the regionally common mayfly, Heptagenia dalecarlica, to discharges from the Talvivaara mine (Sotkamo, Northern Finland), which uses a biomining technique. Behavioral responses measured in 3 mine-impacted streams were compared with those measured in 3 reference streams. In addition, 3-d survival of the mayfly larvae and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was measured in the study sites. Biomining impacts on stream water quality included increased concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, and metals, especially manganese, cadmium, zinc, sodium, and calcium. Survival of the invertebrates in the short term was not affected by the mine effluents. In contrast, apparent behavioral changes in mayfly larvae were detected, but these responses were not consistent among sites, which may reflect differing natural water chemistry of the study sites. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:147-155. © 2016 SETAC.
PubMed ID
27253991 View in PubMed
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Assessment of Fish Embryo Survival and Growth by In Situ Incubation in Acidic Boreal Streams Undergoing Biomining Effluents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299616
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2019 Jan; 76(1):51-65
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Hanna E Arola
Anna K Karjalainen
Jukka T Syrjänen
Maija Hannula
Ari Väisänen
Juha Karjalainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, PO Box 35, 40014, Jyväskylä, Finland. hanna.e.arola@jyu.fi.
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2019 Jan; 76(1):51-65
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Embryo, Nonmammalian - drug effects
Embryonic Development - drug effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Metals - analysis - toxicity
Mining
Rivers - chemistry
Salmonidae - embryology
Seasons
Sulfates - analysis - toxicity
Trout - embryology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
The applicability of an in situ incubation method in monitoring the effects of metal mining on early life stages of fish was evaluated by investigating the impacts of a biomining technology utilizing mine on the mortality, growth, and yolk consumption of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) embryos. Newly fertilized eggs were incubated from autumn 2014 to spring 2015 in six streams under the influence of the mine located in North-Eastern Finland and in six reference streams. Although the impacted streams clearly had elevated concentrations of several metals and sulfate, the embryonic mortality of the two species did not differ between the impacted and the reference streams. Instead, particle accumulation to some cylinders had a significant impact on the embryonic mortality of both species. In clean cylinders, mortality was higher in streams with lower minimum pH. However, low pH levels were evident in both the reference and the mine-impacted groups. The embryonic growth of neither species was impacted by the mining activities, and the growth and yolk consumption of the embryos was mainly regulated by water temperature. Surprisingly, whitefish embryos incubated in streams with lower minimum pH had larger body size. In general, the applied in situ method is applicable in boreal streams for environmental assessment and monitoring, although in our study, we did not observe a specific mining impact differing from the effects of other environmental factors related to catchment characteristics.
PubMed ID
30218120 View in PubMed
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Behaviour of radionuclides during microbially-induced mining of nickel at Talvivaara, Eastern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276633
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 1:105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Hanna Tuovinen
Esa Pohjolainen
Janne Lempinen
Daniela Vesterbacka
David Read
Dina Solatie
Jukka Lehto
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2016 Jan;151 Pt 1:105-13
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Mining
Nickel
Radiation monitoring
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The Talvivaara mine in Eastern Finland utilizes microbe-induced heap leaching to recover nickel and other valuable metals (Zn, Cu, Co) from a black schist ore. In addition to the target metals, the ore contains uranium at a concentration of 17 mg/kg, incorporated as uraninite (UO2). Uranium oxidizes from the U(IV) to U(VI) state during leaching and dissolves as the uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) in the acidic pregnant leach solution. Mobilisation of uranium has caused sufficient concern that plans have been developed for uranium recovery. The aim of this study is to generate new data leading to a better understanding of the fate of its radiotoxic daughter nuclides, primarily (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po, in the mining process. It is shown that uranium daughters mostly remain in the heaps during the leaching process and are associated with secondary minerals, including jarosite, goethite and gypsum. Thorium and progeny ((232)Th plus (228)Th, (228)Ra) are also mainly retained. High sulphate concentrations in the acidic solutions limit the solubility of radium by incorporation in the crystal lattices of precipitated secondary sulphates. Electron probe microanalysis shows that goethite in the heaps is uraniferous, resulting from the adsorption of U(VI). After recovery of target metals, the pregnant leach solution is neutralized to further remove metal contaminants and the resulting slurries stored in a bunded tailings pond. The activity concentrations of thorium, radium, lead and polonium isotopes are generally low in the pond owing to prior retention by secondary minerals in the heaps. However, (238)U activity concentrations range up to 3375 Bq/kg, which exceeds the permitted value (1000 Bq/kg) for natural radionuclides of the (238)U series.
PubMed ID
26454201 View in PubMed
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Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Feb;13(1):26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987
Author
R S Koskela
M. Klockars
E. Järvinen
P J Kolari
A. Rossi
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1987 Feb;13(1):26-31
Date
Feb-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Respiration Disorders - etiology - mortality
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to investigate the cancer mortality of granite workers. The study comprised 1,026 workers hired between 1940 and 1971. The number of person-years was 20,165, and the number of deaths 235. During the total follow-up 46 tumors were observed and 44.9 were expected. An excess mortality from tumors was observed for the workers followed for 20 years or more, the greatest excess occurring during the follow-up period of 25-29 years (observed 11, expected 5.2). Of the 46 tumors, 22 were lung cancers (expected 17.1) and 15 were gastrointestinal cancers (expected 9.7), nine of which were cancers of the stomach (expected 6.0). Mortality from lung cancer was excessive for workers with at least 15 years since entry into granite work (latency) (21 observed and 9.5 expected), being highest during the follow-up period of 25-29 years (observed 8, expected 2.1). The results indicate that granite exposure per se may be an etiologic factor in the initiation or promotion of malignant neoplasms.
PubMed ID
3033818 View in PubMed
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Characterization of fine fraction mined from two Finnish landfills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276212
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Jan;47(Pt A):34-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Tiina J Mönkäre
Marja R T Palmroth
Jukka A Rintala
Source
Waste Manag. 2016 Jan;47(Pt A):34-9
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Methane - analysis
Mining
Refuse Disposal
Solid Waste - analysis
Waste Disposal Facilities
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
A fine fraction (FF) was mined from two Finnish municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Kuopio (1- to 10-year-old, referred as new landfill) and Lohja (24- to 40-year-old, referred as old landfill) in order to characterize FF. In Kuopio the FF (
PubMed ID
25817722 View in PubMed
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Collecting a citizen's digital footprint for health data mining.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276567
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2015;2015:7626-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Oguzhan Gencoglu
Heidi Simila
Harri Honko
Minna Isomursu
Source
Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2015;2015:7626-9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection - methods
Data Mining - methods
Finland
Health
Humans
Registries
Abstract
This paper describes a case study for collecting digital footprint data for the purpose of health data mining. The case study involved 20 subjects residing in Finland who were instructed to collect data from registries which they evaluated to be useful for understanding their health or health behaviour, current or past. 11 subjects were active, sending 100 data requests to 49 distinct organizations in total. Our results indicate that there are still practical challenges in collecting actionable digital footprint data. Our subjects received a total of 75 replies (reply rate of 75.0%) and 61 datasets (reception rate of 61%). Out of the received data, 44 datasets (72.1%) were delivered in paper format, 4 (6.6%) in portable document format and 13 (21.3%) in structured digital form. The time duration between the sending of the information requests and reception of a reply was 26.4 days on the average.
PubMed ID
26738058 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.