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63 records – page 1 of 7.

An examination of the fibrous mineral content of asbestos lung tissue from the Canadian chrysotile mining industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250530
Source
Environ Res. 1976 Dec;12(3):281-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1976

An inventory of historical mercury emissions in maritime canada: implications for present and future contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197892
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 22;256(1):39-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2000
Author
E M Sunderlan
G L Chmura
Author Affiliation
School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. ems@sfu.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 22;256(1):39-57
Date
Jun-22-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Forecasting
Fossil Fuels
Humans
Industry
Mercury - analysis
Mining
Refuse Disposal
Abstract
Mercury is a longstanding concern in Maritime Canada due to high levels of contamination in a number of fish and bird species. The recycled component of past releases of anthropogenic mercury may be a significant source of ongoing pollution in many areas. Historical information on mercury releases can be used to quantify past and present anthropogenic contamination. We present an inventory of historical mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources in Maritime Canada for the years 1800-1995. Long-term trends in mercury emissions and the significance of the cumulative burden of mercury released from local sources are discussed. Emissions are calculated using both historical monitoring data and the application of emission factors. The nature of current anthropogenic sources of mercury is quite different than it was several decades ago when many of the existing policies governing mercury pollution were created. Our inventory illustrates that many of the most significant sources in the past such as the chlor-alkali industry, paint containing mercury additives, and pharmaceuticals, have been largely phased out with fossil fuel combustion and waste disposal remaining as the most significant modern sources. Atmospheric emissions in Maritime Canada peaked in 1945 (> 1,750 kg year-1), and again between 1965 and 1970 (> 2,600 kg year-1). Cumulative releases of mercury from anthropogenic sources for the years 1800-1995 were between 115 and 259 t to the atmosphere alone, and 327-448 t when discharges to wastewater and effluents were included. Assuming that only 0.2% (Nriagu, 1994.) of these releases become part of the recycled fraction of current fluxes, we estimate that between 570 and 900 kg Hg year-1 is deposited in Maritime Canada from past anthropogenic sources. Modern sources within Maritime Canada contribute at least 405 kg year-1 to the total annual deposition of 1.71 t over the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, leaving approximately 735 kg year-1 from natural sources and long-range contamination. Further study is needed to verify these estimates and clarify the significance of natural and long-range sources of mercury in Maritime Canada.
PubMed ID
10898386 View in PubMed
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Arsenic mobility and characterization in lakes impacted by gold ore roasting, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292468
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Martin D Van Den Berghe
Heather E Jamieson
Michael J Palmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen's University, 36 Union St., Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada; Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, 3651 Trousdale Pkwy, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA. Electronic address: mdvanden@usc.edu.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:630-641
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arsenic - analysis
Arsenicals - analysis
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Gold
Lakes - analysis
Mining
Oxides - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The controls on the mobility and fate of arsenic in lakes impacted by historical gold ore roasting in northern Canada have been examined. A detailed characterization of arsenic solid and aqueous phases in lake waters, lake sediments and sediment porewaters as well as surrounding soils was conducted in three small lakes (80 wt%) of arsenic is contained in the form of secondary sulphide precipitates, with iron oxy-hydroxides hosting a minimal amount of arsenic (
PubMed ID
29223820 View in PubMed
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The assessment of exposure in terms of fibres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217636
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1994 Aug;38(4):477-87, 409-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
G W Gibbs
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1994 Aug;38(4):477-87, 409-10
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis
Canada
Dust
Environmental monitoring
Great Britain
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology
Mining
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Textile Industry
United States
Abstract
The membrane filter (MF) method for evaluating asbestos fibre concentrations was introduced in the 1960s. Before that time the midget impinger (MI) was used in North America, while the long running (LRTP) and regular thermal precipitator (TP) were used in the U.K. All studies from which estimates of long-term health risks can be derived (i.e. those with individual cumulative lifetime exposure estimates) were based on the now obsolete methods. The reliability of converting these indices of exposure to MF equivalent concentrations was reviewed. It was concluded that no overall single factor could be derived for the Quebec mining and milling industry. However, it has been possible to derive conversion factors at the individual mill and work area level. Applying these in one Quebec mortality study analysis based on all jobs held by persons in the cohort gave an overall MF/MI ratio of 3.6. An examination of the confidence intervals surrounding the Quebec data, ratios derived for other chrysotile mines by other investigators, and measurements of fibre concentrations in the 1970s suggest that this was probably not unreasonable. Side-by-side and other measurements were used to convert MI concentrations in the U.S. textile industry to MF fibre concentrations. While conversions involve considerable uncertainty, independent measurements of fibres in the lung tissues of workers from the U.S. textile plant and Quebec mills show that in lungs the ratios of the concentrations of chrysotile to those of tremolite are quite consistent with the ratio of assessed exposures to these fibres in the two industries. There is an apparently higher risk of mesothelioma in one Quebec mining area (Thetford Mines) than in another (Asbestos). A high concentration of fibrous tremolite has been found in the lungs of workers in Thetford. A method of evaluating the extent to which mesothelioma risk in the chrysotile mining industry might be explained by tremolite exposures was proposed. The slope of the lung cancer dose-response relationship for the textile industry is approximately 50 times that for the mining and milling industry. Available data on the length distributions of fibres from Quebec mines and mills (up to 5% > 5 microns) and the Charleston textile plant (up to 21% > 5 microns) and some marginal indication of longer fibres in tissues from Charleston workers suggest that further work specifically addressing differences in the size distributions of long fibres in these industries is needed.
PubMed ID
7978969 View in PubMed
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Biogeochemical and ecological considerations in designing wetland treatment systems in post-mining landscapes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195611
Source
Waste Manag. 2001;21(2):191-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
M. Kalin
Author Affiliation
Boojum Research Ltd, 468 Queen Street East, Suite 101, Box 19, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5A 1T7. margarte.kalin@utoronto.ca
Source
Waste Manag. 2001;21(2):191-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fresh Water - chemistry
Geologic sediments
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Mining
Program Development
Rain
Soil Microbiology
Transportation - methods
Water Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Abstract
Although wetlands have gained acceptance as important components of ecosystems in post-mining landscapes in the past decade, their roles in contaminant retention/removal have not been well integrated into the designing of restoration programs. This paper describes the integration of sediment microbial activities and natural precipitation processes, along with approaches to defining the contaminant load from the mine wastes. The contaminant removal rates, which can be expected by a wetland sediment, are summarized and how they need to be reflected in the wetland size required, and the carbon supply which is needed. Contaminant loading from mining wastes can be balanced by wetland ecological processes, including wetland primary production and microbial mineralization in the sediment. This ecological engineering approach is demonstrated using case studies on hard-rock mining waste in Canada.
PubMed ID
11220184 View in PubMed
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Biomedical surveillance: rights conflict with rights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236478
Source
J Occup Med. 1986 Oct;28(10):958-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
G. Atherley
N. Johnston
M. Tennassee
Source
J Occup Med. 1986 Oct;28(10):958-65
Date
Oct-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aviation
Biomedical research
Canada
Civil Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure
Ethics
Government Regulation
Humans
Lead
Mandatory Programs
Mass Screening - legislation & jurisprudence
Mining
Monitoring, Physiologic
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Research Subjects
Risk assessment
Uranium
Abstract
Medical screening and biomedical monitoring violate individual rights. Such conflicts of right with right are acted upon synergistically by uncertainty which, in some important respects, increases rather than decreases as a result of research. Issues of rightness and wrongness, ethical issues, arise because the human beings who are subjects of medical screening and biological monitoring often have little or no option whether to be subjected to them. We identify issues of rightness and wrongness of biomedical surveillance for various purposes of occupational health and safety. We distinguish between social validity and scientific validity. We observe that principles are well established for scientific validity, but not for social validity. We support guidelines as a way forward.
PubMed ID
3772552 View in PubMed
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Blinded taste panel evaluations to determine if fish from near the oil sands are preferred less than fish from other locations in Alberta, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137800
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 15;45(4):1730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2011
Author
Brenda Barona
Rozlyn F Young
Phillip M Fedorak
Wendy V Wismer
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2P5.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Feb 15;45(4):1730-6
Date
Feb-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Animals
Canada
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Fishes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Oil and Gas Fields
Rivers
Seafood - classification
Taste
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The oil sands industry is rapidly expanding surface mining and bitumen extraction operations near the Athabasca River in northeastern Alberta, Canada. There are anecdotal comments that the fish from the Athabasca River have an off-taste, implying that the oil sands operations are the cause. This study was done to determine if the taste of wild fishes caught near the Athabasca oil sands was less preferred than the taste of fishes collected from two other river basins in Alberta. In blinded experiments, consumer sensory panels, of 40 to 44 participants, tasted steamed samples of each of three fish species (walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)) from three different sources in Alberta (the Athabasca River, Buck Lake, and McGregor Lake). Data analyses showed that there was no evidence from the consumer preference rankings that the taste of the fish from the Athabasca River was preferred less than the taste of fish from two other water bodies in Alberta.
PubMed ID
21247102 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.