Skip header and navigation

Refine By

38 records – page 1 of 4.

Arctic terrestrial ecosystem contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3575
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Jul 15;122(1-2):135-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1992
Author
D J Thomas
B. Tracey
H. Marshall
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Axys Group Ltd, Sidney, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Jul 15;122(1-2):135-64
Date
Jul-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Eggs - analysis
Humans
Hydrocarbons - analysis
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Metals - analysis
Mining
Petroleum
Plants - metabolism
Radioactive Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Reindeer - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Limited data have been collected on the presence of contaminants in the Arctic terrestrial ecosystem, with the exception of radioactive fallout from atmospheric weapons testing. Although southern and temperate biological systems have largely cleansed themselves of radioactive fallout deposited during the 1950s and 1960s, Arctic environments have not. Lichens accumulate radioactivity more than many other plants because of their large surface area and long life span; the presence and persistence of radioisotopes in the Arctic is of concern because of the lichen----reindeer----human ecosystem. Effective biological half-life of cesium 137 is reckoned to be substantially less than its physical half-life. The database on organochlorines in Canadian Arctic terrestrial mammals and birds is very limited, but indications are that the air/plant/animal contaminant pathway is the major route of these compounds into the terrestrial food chain. For terrestrial herbivores, the most abundant organochlorine is usually hexachlorobenzene followed by hexachlorocyclohexane isomers. PCB accumulation favours the hexachlorobiphenyl, pentachlorobiphenyl and heptachlorobiphenyl homologous series. The concentrations of the various classes of organochlorine compounds are substantially lower in terrestrial herbivore tissues than in marine mammal tissues. PCBs and DDT are the most abundant residues in peregrine falcons (a terrestrial carnivore) reaching average levels of 9.2 and 10.4 micrograms.g-1, respectively, more than 10 times higher than other organochlorines and higher than in marine mammals, including the polar bear. Contaminants from local sources include metals from mining activities, hydrocarbons and waste drilling fluids from oil and gas exploration and production, wastes from DEW line sites, naturally occurring radionuclides associated with uranium mineralization, and smoke containing SO2 and H2SO4 aerosol from the Smoking Hills at Cape Bathurst, N.W.T.
PubMed ID
1355310 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arsenic, antimony, and nickel leaching from northern peatlands treating mining influenced water in cold climate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298194
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Mar 20; 657:1161-1172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-20-2019
Author
Uzair Akbar Khan
Katharina Kujala
Soile P Nieminen
Marja Liisa Räisänen
Anna-Kaisa Ronkanen
Author Affiliation
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Unit, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4300, FI-90014, Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: uzair.khan@oulu.fi.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Mar 20; 657:1161-1172
Date
Mar-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Antimony - analysis
Arctic Regions
Arsenic - analysis
Finland
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Mining
Nickel - analysis
Oxygen - analysis
Soil - chemistry
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Increased metal mining in the Arctic region has caused elevated loads of arsenic (As), antimony (Sb), nickel (Ni), and sulfate (SO42-) to recipient surface or groundwater systems. The need for cost-effective active and passive mine water treatment methods has also increased. Natural peatlands are commonly used as a final step for treatment of mining influenced water. However, their permanent retention of harmful substances is affected by influent concentrations and environmental conditions. The effects of dilution, pH, temperature, oxygen availability, and contaminant accumulation on retention and leaching of As, Sb, Ni, and sulfate from mine process water and drainage water obtained from treatment peatlands in Finnish Lapland were studied in batch sorption experiments, and discussed in context of field data and environmental impacts. The results, while demonstrating effectiveness of peat to remove the target contaminants from mine water, revealed the risk of leaching of As, Sb, and SO42- from treatment peatlands when diluted mine water was introduced. Sb was more readily leached compared to As while leaching of both was supported by higher pH of 9. No straightforward effect of temperature and oxygen availability in controlling removal and leaching was evident from the results. The results also showed that contaminant accumulation in treatment peatlands after long-term use can lead to decreased removal and escalated leaching of contaminants, with the effect being more pronounced for As and Ni.
PubMed ID
30677883 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Automated diagnosis of vibration disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227675
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(10):17-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
V G Kolesov
V P Il'in
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1991;91(10):17-20
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
Hand - blood supply - innervation
Humans
Mining
Neurocirculatory Asthenia - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Paresthesia - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Plethysmography, Impedance
Regional Blood Flow
Siberia
Skin - blood supply - innervation
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
Based on a multidimensional discriminant analysis of the clinical and physiological characteristics derived as a result of examination of 593 miners, classification functions were plotted, allowing the diagnosis of vibratory disease in the automatic mode by means of mathematic computations. Functional indicators of skin sensitivity, particularly vibratory, dynamometry, rheovasography and thermography of the hand and fingers, a "white spot" symptom, and characteristics derived on a mathematic analysis of heart rhythm were established to be informative for automated diagnosis. The diagnosis was found to be more accurate in case of using a two-stage variant of the discriminant analysis where the differentiation is first made between healthy workers and workers with a pathology, followed by the discrimination of the preclinical and clinical phase of the disease. The automated diagnostic system is demonstrated to compare very favourably with the conventional method of diagnosis.
PubMed ID
1665642 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Central hemodynamic function of miners operating underground self-propelled equipment in the Arctic Kola Peninsula].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232886
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1988 Jul;(7):49-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1988
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1992;(6):19-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
V G Kolesov
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1992;(6):19-22
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Cervical Vertebrae
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Osteochondritis - diagnosis - etiology
Severity of Illness Index
Siberia
Vibration - adverse effects
Abstract
Characteristics, frequency and distribution of vertebrogenic diseases involving cervico-brachial region were studied in more than 1,000 miners from asian North and East exposed to vibration. The data were compared with the results of examination of drivers. The investigation revealed a high level of vertebrogenic cervical pain and cervico-brachial pain in miners with a long length of service, especially in those suffering from vibration disease and frequent osteochondrosis manifestation in younger age, especially in subjects working beyond the Polar Circle. Occupational hazards are proved to play a leading role in the early development of vertebrogenic diseases, and vibration disease predisposes to such pathology. The results make possible to consider the vertebrogenic cervical pain and cervico-brachial pain as occupational diseases in young-aged workers with long length of service or evaluate such diseases as complications of vibration disease in individuals facing this occupational pathology.
PubMed ID
1478518 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in the serum lipid profile in man during 24 months of arctic residence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302361
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jul;58(3):170-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
Bojko ER
Larsen TS
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jul;58(3):170-5.
Date
1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Physiology
Adult
Arctic Regions
Cholesterol, HDL
Cold Temperature
Blood
Fatty acids
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Reference Values
Spectrophotometry
Triglycerides
Abstract
The influence of the severe climate and geographical conditions at the Svalbard archipelago (78-79 degrees N) on serum lipid levels were measured in Caucasian miners who had arrived from the southern part of Ukraine and Russia (48 degrees N). The persons included in the study were randomly divided in five groups according to their time of living (1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months) at Svalbard. Blood sampling took place during a two week period in January, when the Svalbard archipelago is into its polar night. General elevated levels of triglycerides were found in group I-III (1, 3 and 6 months stay), whereas the values measured in group IV and V (12 and 24 months stay) were somewhat lower. This apparent decline in triglycerides was paralelled by generally elevated levels of HDL cholesterol. The serum level of phospholipids was similar in all groups. All the level of free fatty acids was apparently higher in groups IV and V, particularly 18:3 and 16:1. These results may be indicative of a rise in triglyceride consumption after about a 12 month stay in the archipelago. Besides, the elevated levels of 18:3 and 16:1 fatty acids imply dietary modifications of the serum fatty acids.
PubMed ID
10528467 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of the combined action of the beryllium-containing dust from complex metal ores in the Far North (clinical hygienic and experimental studies)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246864
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1979 Sep;(9):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979

[Characteristics of work schedules of miners exposed to vibration in placer and ore mines in the North-West].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227510
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A A Loginov
G N Kim
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):23-6
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Far East
Gold
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Mining - standards
Occupational Medicine - standards
Siberia
Time Factors
Vibration
Work Capacity Evaluation
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
The contributors review the peculiarities of modelling the labour regimen for the vibration-affected professions in the North-West, based on the dosage-related approach, inasmuch as the existing techniques of ore deposits elaboration (chamber-long face and magnification of ore), and the organization of pit works on cyclogrammes, did not allow a practical application of the labour regimen recommendations proposed by the USSR Ministry of Health.
PubMed ID
1817080 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical and hygienic aspects of the effect of antimony ore on workers in the Far North].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227666
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
E A Lobanova
L I Ivanova
V V Pankova
A G Chebotarev
A P Naumova
P I Sattarova
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(12):16-7
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Antimony - adverse effects
Arctic Regions
Arsenic - adverse effects
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Humans
Mining
Pneumoconiosis - etiology
Siberia
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Abstract
The clinical and hygienic studies performed at the antimonite ore extraction mines in Yakutia revealed that the workers were exposed to high concentrations of polymetallic dusts, containing chromium dioxide, antimony, arsenic and their compounds. 11% of the workers exhibited dust bronchitis, changes in the blood and immune reactivity indices which were due to reactions of adaptation to the Far North climatic conditions and the occupational factors' toxic effects.
PubMed ID
1667865 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Disease patterns during the first year in the arctic mining industry]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6185
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Apr 13;154(16):1107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-13-1992
Author
J. Gottlieb
Author Affiliation
Laegestationen, Maarmorilik, Umanak laegedistrikt, Grønland.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Apr 13;154(16):1107-11
Date
Apr-13-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mining
Morbidity
Occupational Health Services - organization & administration - standards - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Workload
Abstract
In the zinc, lead and silver ore mine of Maarmorilik, Greenland 1,061 episodes of illness in the first year of employment were studied in 421 persons. Despite the fact that about 80% of the employees were of Scandinavian origin, the patterns of illness were considerably different from the health problems in primary health care units in Denmark. Urogenital problems were the only group of illnesses representing overweight of multiple contact episodes. All other groups of diagnoses were dominated by episodes of single contact. Dental problems, traumatic and urogenital episodes appeared more frequently compared to Danish primary health care units. The lower frequency of traumatic episodes in women reflected their employment in service jobs only. Despite a health examination before employment the total amount of episodes of illness corresponded to that of primary health care units in Denmark, and the age specific contact rate for males was higher than in other morbidity studies from Greenland. Possible explanations were: sick leave required documentation of the doctor, the workload was heavy and prolonged, the spare time possibilities were few, the buildings were inadequate, the employees were isolated from their families for months and the consumption of alcohol was considerable. Because the doctor was the only person with health education in the mining village, knowledge about dental treatment and considerable experience in traumatology and diagnosis of venereal disease were necessary.
PubMed ID
1523720 View in PubMed
Less detail

38 records – page 1 of 4.