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C-CIARN North - Nunavut Community Research Needs Survey: Summary Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294607
Source
Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network. 24 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2003]
............................................................... 15 Wildlife Harvesting....................................................................................................... 17 Waste Management....................................................................................................... 18 Mining
  1 document  
Author
Shirley, Jamal
Author Affiliation
Manager, C-CIARN North-Nunavut
Source
Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network. 24 p.
Date
[2003]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
768638
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Ecosystems
Health
Safety
Weather
Waste management
Mining
Research
Documents

c-ciarn_research_needs_survey.pdf

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Radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-human food chain near uranium mining operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20969
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 1999 Jul;107(7):527-537
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
  1 website  
Author
Thomas, PA
Gates, TE
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. thomasp@sask.usask.ca
Source
Environmental Health Perspectives. 1999 Jul;107(7):527-537
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Food chain
Food contamination, radioactive
Gamma Rays
Humans
Lichens - metabolism
Male
Mining
Radiation Dosage
Radioisotopes - analysis
Reindeer - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The richest uranium ore bodies ever discovered (Cigar Lake and McArthur River) are presently under development in northeastern Saskatchewan. This subarctic region is also home to several operating uranium mines and aboriginal communities, partly dependent upon caribou for subsistence. Because of concerns over mining impacts and the efficient transfer of airborne radionuclides through the lichen-caribou-human food chain, radionuclides were analyzed in tissues from 18 barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus). Radionuclides included uranium (U), radium (226Ra), lead (210Pb), and polonium (210Po) from the uranium decay series; the fission product (137Cs) from fallout; and naturally occurring potassium (40K). Natural background radiation doses average 2-4 mSv/year from cosmic rays, external gamma rays, radon inhalation, and ingestion of food items. The ingestion of 210Po and 137Cs when caribou are consumed adds to these background doses. The dose increment was 0.85 mSv/year for adults who consumed 100 g of caribou meat per day and up to 1.7 mSv/year if one liver and 10 kidneys per year were also consumed. We discuss the cancer risk from these doses. Concentration ratios (CRs), relating caribou tissues to lichens or rumen (stomach) contents, were calculated to estimate food chain transfer. The CRs for caribou muscle ranged from 1 to 16% for U, 6 to 25% for 226Ra, 1 to 2% for 210Pb, 6 to 26% for 210Po, 260 to 370% for 137Cs, and 76 to 130% for 40K, with 137Cs biomagnifying by a factor of 3-4. These CRs are useful in predicting caribou meat concentrations from the lichens, measured in monitoring programs, for the future evaluation of uranium mining impacts on this critical food chain.
PubMed ID
10378999 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Risk communication and trust in decision-maker action: a case study of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107705
Source
Pages 456-462 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):456-462
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES Risk communication and trust in decision-maker action: a case study of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan Cynthia G. Jardine1*, Laura Banfield2 , S. Michelle Driedger3 and Christopher M. Furgal4 '5 1 School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  1 document  
Author
Cynthia G Jardine
Laura Banfield
S Michelle Driedger
Christopher M Furgal
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. cindy.jardine@ualberta.ca
Source
Pages 456-462 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):456-462
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arsenicals - adverse effects
Communication
Decision Making, Organizational
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Remediation - methods
Gold
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Mining - organization & administration
Northwest Territories
Oxides - adverse effects
Risk Management - organization & administration
Trust
Abstract
The development and implementation of a remediation plan for the residual arsenic trioxide stored at the former Giant Mine site in the Canadian Northwest Territories has raised important issues related to trust. Social and individual trust of those responsible for making decisions on risks is critically important in community judgements on risk and the acceptability of risk management decisions. Trust is known to be affected by value similarity and confidence in past performance, which serve as interacting sources of cooperation in acting toward a common goal.
To explore the elements of trust associated with the development and implementation of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight purposively selected key informants representing both various interested and affected parties and the two government proponents.
Five primary issues related to trust were identified by the participants: (1) a historical legacy of mistrust between the community (particularly Aboriginal peoples) and government; (2) barriers to building trust with the federal government; (3) limited community input and control over the decision-making process; (4) the conflicted and confounded role of the government agencies being both proponent and regulator, and the resulting need for independent oversight; and (5) distrust of the government to commit to the perpetual care required for the remediation option selected.
The dual-mode model of trust and confidence was shown to be a useful framework for understanding the pivotal role of trust in the development of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan. Failure to recognize issues of trust based on value dissimilarity and lack of confidence based on past performance have resulted in a lack of cooperation characterized by delayed remediation and a prolonged and expensive consultation process. Government recognition of the importance of trust to these issues will hopefully improve future communication and public engagement endeavours.
Notes
Cites: Risk Anal. 1999 Aug;19(4):689-70110765431
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Dec;37(4):16-3716541817
Cites: Risk Anal. 1997 Feb;17(1):43-549131825
Cites: Risk Anal. 2003 Aug;23(4):705-1612926564
PubMed ID
23984297 View in PubMed
Documents
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