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A State-of-the-Science Review of Mercury Biomarkers in Human Populations Worldwide between 2000 and 2018.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299311
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 10; 126(10):106001
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
10-2018
Author
Niladri Basu
Milena Horvat
David C Evers
Irina Zastenskaya
Pál Weihe
Joanna Tempowski
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 10; 126(10):106001
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biomarkers - analysis - blood - urine
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental pollution
Food Contamination
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis - blood - urine
Mining
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
The Minamata Convention on Mercury provided a mandate for action against global mercury pollution. However, our knowledge of mercury exposures is limited because there are many regions and subpopulations with little or no data.
We aimed to increase worldwide understanding of human exposures to mercury by collecting, collating, and analyzing mercury concentrations in biomarker samples reported in the published scientific literature.
A systematic search of the peer-reviewed scientific literature was performed using three databases. A priori search strategy, eligibility criteria, and data extraction steps were used to identify relevant studies.
We collected 424,858 mercury biomarker measurements from 335,991 individuals represented in 312 articles from 75 countries. General background populations with insignificant exposures have blood, hair, and urine mercury levels that generally fall under [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively. We identified four populations of concern: a) Arctic populations who consume fish and marine mammals; b) tropical riverine communities (especially Amazonian) who consume fish and in some cases may be exposed to mining; c) coastal and/or small-island communities who substantially depend on seafood; and d) individuals who either work or reside among artisanal and small-scale gold mining sites.
This review suggests that all populations worldwide are exposed to some amount of mercury and that there is great variability in exposures within and across countries and regions. There remain many geographic regions and subpopulations with limited data, thus hindering evidence-based decision making. This type of information is critical in helping understand exposures, particularly in light of certain stipulations in the Minamata Convention on Mercury. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP3904.
PubMed ID
30407086 View in PubMed
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