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C-CIARN North - Nunavut Community Research Needs Survey: Summary Report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294607
Source
Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network. 24 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2003]
............................................................... 15 Wildlife Harvesting....................................................................................................... 17 Waste Management....................................................................................................... 18 Mining
  1 document  
Author
Shirley, Jamal
Author Affiliation
Manager, C-CIARN North-Nunavut
Source
Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network. 24 p.
Date
[2003]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
768638
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Ecosystems
Health
Safety
Weather
Waste management
Mining
Research
Documents

c-ciarn_research_needs_survey.pdf

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Comparison of heavy metals, parasites and histopathology in sculpins (Myoxocephalus spp.) from two sites at a lead-zinc mine in North East Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303021
Source
Environ Res. 2018 08; 165:306-316
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Rasmus Dyrmose Nørregaard
Mai Dang
Lis Bach
Ole Geertz-Hansen
Kim Gustavson
Peter Aastrup
Pall S Leifsson
Jens Søndergaard
Barbara Nowak
Christian Sonne
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark; Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Department of Environment and Mineral Resources, Nuuk, Greenland. Electronic address: rdyn@bios.au.dk.
Source
Environ Res. 2018 08; 165:306-316
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Greenland
Lead
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Mining
Parasites
Perciformes - parasitology
Zinc
Abstract
The former lead-zinc mine at Mestersvig, Greenland, continues to contaminate the surrounding environment despite its operations ceasing over 50 years ago. Elevated concentrations of heavy metals are found in water, sediment and biota in the terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. To shed light on the present contamination and its potential effects on local fish we investigated gill and liver histology of sculpins (Myoxocephalus spp.) around the former mining area. Two species of sculpins were caught; shorthorn sculpins (M. scorpius; n?=?16) and fourhorn sculpins (M. quadricornis; n?=?17) at a contaminated site, Nyhavn, and shorthorn sculpins (M. scorpius; n?=?25) at the reference site. In a previous study we found histopathological changes in the tissues of the sculpins, and we suspected this to be related to elevated heavy metal tissue concentrations. Concentrations of Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn were significantly higher in sculpins at Nyhavn compared to the reference site. Reference NOED and LOEC thresholds for biochemistry, tissue lesions, growth, survival and reproduction for hepatic Hg, As, Cd and Pb from the ERED database were exceeded in both sculpin species. Histopathological investigations of the sculpins gills revealed significant increases in the prevalence of hyperplastic epithelium, inflammation, intensity of neutral and total mucus cells and chloride cells along with an increased infection of colonial Peritricha. At the contaminated Nyhavn site, fourhorn sculpins had a significantly higher prevalence of chondroplastic tissue and intensity of neutral, mixed and total mucus cells in the gills compared to the shorthorn sculpins. The data indicate that both sculpin species could be useful indicator species for environmental monitoring of metal pollution in Arctic areas. However, confounding effects of gender and species should be investigated further. Effects on other biomarkers as well as baseline measurements should be included in future environmental monitoring efforts around mining activities in Greenland.
PubMed ID
29777921 View in PubMed
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Man's health in a changing arctic environment: Issue papers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83459
Source
Papers from a conference sponsored by Alaska Dept. of Health and Welfare and U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare
Publication Type
Report
Date
1971
Author
Conference on Arctic Health
Source
Papers from a conference sponsored by Alaska Dept. of Health and Welfare and U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare
Date
1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic
Asbestos
Benzopyrene
Cold environment
Communicable disease
Community health aide practitioner
Coronary risk factors
Drug abuse
Health hazards
Health services
Hearing loss
Human services
Industrial camps
North Slope
Nutrition
Persistent insecticides
Placer mining
Public Health
Abstract
Persons invited to attend the Conference on Man's Health in a Changing Arctic Environment included representatives of government, education, industry, professions and the general public. Scientific disciplines involved were public health, biomedicine, the behavioral sciences, engineering, ecology, economics and education. Each person on the list was invited to submit an Issue Paper for purposes of background and discussion in the Conference. The response was gratifying. Thirty papers were submitted, representing a cross-section of interests and viewpoints. A perusal of this variety of material will be most useful--and probably fascinating--to all participants in the Conference. The papers are presented here just as they were received--unedited and retaining the flavor and personal style of each author.
Notes
UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: RC958.A4 C66 1970b
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Microbial diversity along a gradient in peatlands treating mining-affected waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302169
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 10 01; 94(10):
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Katharina Kujala
Anu Mikkonen
Karita Saravesi
Anna-Kaisa Ronkanen
Marja Tiirola
Author Affiliation
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Unit, University of Oulu, PO Box 4300, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 10 01; 94(10):
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Archaea - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Biodiversity
Finland
Fungi - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Microbiota
Mining
Soil Microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Peatlands are used for the purification of mining-affected waters in Northern Finland. In Northern climate, microorganisms in treatment peatlands (TPs) are affected by long and cold winters, but studies about those microorganisms are scarce. Thus, the bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities along gradients of mine water influence in two TPs were investigated. The TPs receive waters rich in contaminants, including arsenic (As), sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-). Microbial diversity was high in both TPs, and microbial community composition differed between the studied TPs. Bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria, archaeal communities were dominated by Methanomicrobia and the Candidate phylum Bathyarchaeota, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota (Leotiomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Sordariomycetes). The functional potential of the bacterial and archaeal communities in TPs was predicted using PICRUSt. Sampling points affected by high concentrations of As showed higher relative abundance of predicted functions related to As resistance. Functions potentially involved in nitrogen and SO42- turnover in TPs were predicted for both TPs. The results obtained in this study indicate that (i) diverse microbial communities exist in Northern TPs, (ii) the functional potential of the peatland microorganisms is beneficial for contaminant removal in TPs and (iii) microorganisms in TPs are likely well-adapted to high contaminant concentrations as well as to the Northern climate.
PubMed ID
30137344 View in PubMed
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Semi-passive in-situ pilot scale bioreactor successfully removed sulfate and metals from mine impacted water under subarctic climatic conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295386
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 01; 140:268-279
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2018
Author
Guillaume Nielsen
Ido Hatam
Karl A Abuan
Amelie Janin
Lucie Coudert
Jean Francois Blais
Guy Mercier
Susan A Baldwin
Author Affiliation
Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Université du Québec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Québec, QC G1K 9A9, Canada. Electronic address: guillaume.nielsen@ete.inrs.ca.
Source
Water Res. 2018 09 01; 140:268-279
Date
09-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Bioreactors - microbiology
Metals - chemistry - metabolism
Microbial Consortia - genetics - physiology
Mining
Molasses
Oxidoreductases Acting on Sulfur Group Donors - genetics
Phylogeny
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S
Sulfates - chemistry - metabolism
Sulfur Oxides
Water Pollutants, Chemical - chemistry - metabolism
Water Purification - instrumentation - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Mine drainage contaminated with metals is a major environmental threat since it is a source of water pollution with devastating effects on aquatic ecosystems. Conventional active treatment technologies are prohibitively expensive and so there is increasing demand to develop reliable, cost-effective and sustainable passive or semi-passive treatment. These are promising alternatives since they leverage the metabolism of microorganisms native to the disturbed site at in situ or close to in situ conditions. Since this is a biological approach, it is not clear if semi-passive treatment would be effective in remote locations with extremely cold weather such as at mines in the subarctic. In this study we tested the hypothesis that sulfate-reducing bacteria, which are microorganisms that promote metal precipitation, exist in subarctic mine environments and their activity can be stimulated by adding a readily available carbon source. An experiment was setup at a closed mine in the Yukon Territory, Canada, where leaching of Zn and Cd occurs. To test if semi-passive treatment could precipitate these metals and prevent further leaching from waste rock, molasses as a carbon source was added to anaerobic bioreactors mimicking the belowground in-situ conditions. Microbial community analysis confirmed that sulfate-reducing bacteria became enriched in the bioreactors upon addition of molasses. The population composition remained fairly stable over the 14 month operating period despite temperature shifts from 17 to 5?°C. Sulfate reduction functionality was confirmed by quantification of the gene for dissimilatory sulfite reductase. Metals were removed from underground mine drainage fed into the bioreactors with Zn removal efficiency varying between 20.9% in winter and 89.3% in summer, and Cd removal efficiency between 39% in winter and 90.5% in summer. This study demonstrated that stimulation of native SRB in MIW was possible and that in situ semi-passive treatment can be effective in removing metals despite the cold climate.
PubMed ID
29723816 View in PubMed
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Silica exposure in a mining exploration operation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301189
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2018; 73(6):351-354
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
V H Arrandale
S Kalenge
P A Demers
Author Affiliation
a Occupational Cancer Care Ontario , Cancer Care Ontario , Toronto , CANADA.
Source
Arch Environ Occup Health. 2018; 73(6):351-354
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis
Mining
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ontario
Silicon Dioxide - analysis
Abstract
Though there is extensive research on occupational exposure in production mines, there is limited information on exposure during the exploration phase of mining.
Air samples were collected in a core processing facility in Northern Ontario, Canada. All samples were analyzed for respirable dust (NIOSH 0600) and respirable crystalline silica (NIOSH 7602). Mean exposure levels were estimated and differences in exposure between work areas were investigated.
Sixteen personal and nine area air samples were collected. Respirable dust exposure ranged from
PubMed ID
29283843 View in PubMed
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A State-of-the-Science Review of Mercury Biomarkers in Human Populations Worldwide between 2000 and 2018.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299311
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 10; 126(10):106001
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
10-2018
Author
Niladri Basu
Milena Horvat
David C Evers
Irina Zastenskaya
Pál Weihe
Joanna Tempowski
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 10; 126(10):106001
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Biomarkers - analysis - blood - urine
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental pollution
Food Contamination
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Mercury - analysis - blood - urine
Mining
Seafood - analysis
Abstract
The Minamata Convention on Mercury provided a mandate for action against global mercury pollution. However, our knowledge of mercury exposures is limited because there are many regions and subpopulations with little or no data.
We aimed to increase worldwide understanding of human exposures to mercury by collecting, collating, and analyzing mercury concentrations in biomarker samples reported in the published scientific literature.
A systematic search of the peer-reviewed scientific literature was performed using three databases. A priori search strategy, eligibility criteria, and data extraction steps were used to identify relevant studies.
We collected 424,858 mercury biomarker measurements from 335,991 individuals represented in 312 articles from 75 countries. General background populations with insignificant exposures have blood, hair, and urine mercury levels that generally fall under [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], respectively. We identified four populations of concern: a) Arctic populations who consume fish and marine mammals; b) tropical riverine communities (especially Amazonian) who consume fish and in some cases may be exposed to mining; c) coastal and/or small-island communities who substantially depend on seafood; and d) individuals who either work or reside among artisanal and small-scale gold mining sites.
This review suggests that all populations worldwide are exposed to some amount of mercury and that there is great variability in exposures within and across countries and regions. There remain many geographic regions and subpopulations with limited data, thus hindering evidence-based decision making. This type of information is critical in helping understand exposures, particularly in light of certain stipulations in the Minamata Convention on Mercury. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP3904.
PubMed ID
30407086 View in PubMed
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Undermining subsistence: Barren-ground caribou in a "tragedy of open access".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303035
Source
Sci Adv. 2018 02; 4(2):e1701611
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Brenda L Parlee
John Sandlos
David C Natcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G2H1, Canada.
Source
Sci Adv. 2018 02; 4(2):e1701611
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animals
Canada
Ecosystem
Geography
Humans
Minerals
Mining
Population Dynamics
Population Groups
Porcupines - physiology
Reindeer - physiology
Abstract
Sustaining arctic/subarctic ecosystems and the livelihoods of northern Indigenous peoples is an immense challenge amid increasing resource development. The paper describes a "tragedy of open access" occurring in Canada's north as governments open up new areas of sensitive barren-ground caribou habitat to mineral resource development. Once numbering in the millions, barren-ground caribou populations (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus/Rangifer tarandus granti) have declined over 70% in northern Canada over the last two decades in a cycle well understood by northern Indigenous peoples and scientists. However, as some herds reach critically low population levels, the impacts of human disturbance have become a major focus of debate in the north and elsewhere. A growing body of science and traditional knowledge research points to the adverse impacts of resource development; however, management efforts have been almost exclusively focused on controlling the subsistence harvest of northern Indigenous peoples. These efforts to control Indigenous harvesting parallel management practices during previous periods of caribou population decline (for example, 1950s) during which time governments also lacked evidence and appeared motivated by other values and interests in northern lands and resources. As mineral resource development advances in northern Canada and elsewhere, addressing this "science-policy gap" problem is critical to the sustainability of both caribou and people.
PubMed ID
29503864 View in PubMed
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A vulnerability assessment of Norbotten, Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297143
Source
AVEC : Integrated Assessment of Vulnerable Ecosystems under Global Change EU Concerted Action. International Summer School, Peyresq, Alpes de Haute-Provence, France, 14 – 27 September 2003. 11 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2003
countries: it has large areas of pristine landscape, a Sami minority that has preserved a traditional way of life and a mining industry that is currently one of the main employers of the region but whose resources will soon be exhausted. This region-specific setting is likely to undergo drastic changes
  1 document  
Author
Chen, Youmin
Costache, Andra
Fronzek, Stefan
Hille, Marco
Kahmen, Ansgar
Koch, Katja
Baxter, Bob (tutor)
Source
AVEC : Integrated Assessment of Vulnerable Ecosystems under Global Change EU Concerted Action. International Summer School, Peyresq, Alpes de Haute-Provence, France, 14 – 27 September 2003. 11 p.
Date
2003
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
454450
Keywords
Norrbotten
Climate change
Land use
Sami
Traditional life
Reindeer
Mining
Documents
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9 records – page 1 of 1.