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Comparative histories of polycyclic aromatic compound accumulation in lake sediments near petroleum operations in western Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289241
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):13-21
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2017
Author
Joshua R Thienpont
Cyndy M Desjardins
Linda E Kimpe
Jennifer B Korosi
Steven V Kokelj
Michael J Palmer
Derek C G Muir
Jane L Kirk
John P Smol
Jules M Blais
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5, Canada.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2017 Dec; 231(Pt 1):13-21
Date
Dec-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Alberta
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Lakes - analysis
Mining
Oil and Gas Fields
Petroleum - analysis
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
We examined the historical deposition of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) recorded in radiometrically-dated lake sediment cores from a small, conventional oil and gas operation in the southern Northwest Territories (Cameron Hills), and placed these results in the context of previously published work from three other important regions of western Canada: (1) the Athabasca oil sands region in Alberta; (2) Cold Lake, Alberta; and (3) the Mackenzie Delta, NT. Sediment PAC records from the Cameron Hills showed no clear changes in either source or concentrations coincident with the timing of development in these regions. Changes were small in comparison to the clear increases in both parent and alkyl-substituted PACs in response to industrial development from the Athabasca region surface mining of oil sands, where parent PAC diagnostic ratios indicated a shift from pyrogenic sources (primarily wood and coal burning) in pre-development sediments to more petrogenically-sourced PACs in modern sediments. Cores near in-situ oil sand extraction operations showed only modest increases in PAC deposition. This work directly compares the history and trajectory of contamination in lake ecosystems in areas of western Canada impacted by the most common types of hydrocarbon extraction activities, and provides a context for assessing the environmental impacts of oil and gas development in the future.
PubMed ID
28780061 View in PubMed
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Comparison of heavy metals, parasites and histopathology in sculpins (Myoxocephalus spp.) from two sites at a lead-zinc mine in North East Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303021
Source
Environ Res. 2018 08; 165:306-316
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Rasmus Dyrmose Nørregaard
Mai Dang
Lis Bach
Ole Geertz-Hansen
Kim Gustavson
Peter Aastrup
Pall S Leifsson
Jens Søndergaard
Barbara Nowak
Christian Sonne
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark; Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Department of Environment and Mineral Resources, Nuuk, Greenland. Electronic address: rdyn@bios.au.dk.
Source
Environ Res. 2018 08; 165:306-316
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Environmental monitoring
Greenland
Lead
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Mining
Parasites
Perciformes - parasitology
Zinc
Abstract
The former lead-zinc mine at Mestersvig, Greenland, continues to contaminate the surrounding environment despite its operations ceasing over 50 years ago. Elevated concentrations of heavy metals are found in water, sediment and biota in the terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. To shed light on the present contamination and its potential effects on local fish we investigated gill and liver histology of sculpins (Myoxocephalus spp.) around the former mining area. Two species of sculpins were caught; shorthorn sculpins (M. scorpius; n?=?16) and fourhorn sculpins (M. quadricornis; n?=?17) at a contaminated site, Nyhavn, and shorthorn sculpins (M. scorpius; n?=?25) at the reference site. In a previous study we found histopathological changes in the tissues of the sculpins, and we suspected this to be related to elevated heavy metal tissue concentrations. Concentrations of Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn were significantly higher in sculpins at Nyhavn compared to the reference site. Reference NOED and LOEC thresholds for biochemistry, tissue lesions, growth, survival and reproduction for hepatic Hg, As, Cd and Pb from the ERED database were exceeded in both sculpin species. Histopathological investigations of the sculpins gills revealed significant increases in the prevalence of hyperplastic epithelium, inflammation, intensity of neutral and total mucus cells and chloride cells along with an increased infection of colonial Peritricha. At the contaminated Nyhavn site, fourhorn sculpins had a significantly higher prevalence of chondroplastic tissue and intensity of neutral, mixed and total mucus cells in the gills compared to the shorthorn sculpins. The data indicate that both sculpin species could be useful indicator species for environmental monitoring of metal pollution in Arctic areas. However, confounding effects of gender and species should be investigated further. Effects on other biomarkers as well as baseline measurements should be included in future environmental monitoring efforts around mining activities in Greenland.
PubMed ID
29777921 View in PubMed
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Microbial diversity along a gradient in peatlands treating mining-affected waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302169
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 10 01; 94(10):
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Katharina Kujala
Anu Mikkonen
Karita Saravesi
Anna-Kaisa Ronkanen
Marja Tiirola
Author Affiliation
Water Resources and Environmental Engineering Research Unit, University of Oulu, PO Box 4300, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 10 01; 94(10):
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Archaea - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Bacteria - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Biodiversity
Finland
Fungi - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolism
Microbiota
Mining
Soil Microbiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
Peatlands are used for the purification of mining-affected waters in Northern Finland. In Northern climate, microorganisms in treatment peatlands (TPs) are affected by long and cold winters, but studies about those microorganisms are scarce. Thus, the bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities along gradients of mine water influence in two TPs were investigated. The TPs receive waters rich in contaminants, including arsenic (As), sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-). Microbial diversity was high in both TPs, and microbial community composition differed between the studied TPs. Bacterial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria, archaeal communities were dominated by Methanomicrobia and the Candidate phylum Bathyarchaeota, and fungal communities were dominated by Ascomycota (Leotiomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Sordariomycetes). The functional potential of the bacterial and archaeal communities in TPs was predicted using PICRUSt. Sampling points affected by high concentrations of As showed higher relative abundance of predicted functions related to As resistance. Functions potentially involved in nitrogen and SO42- turnover in TPs were predicted for both TPs. The results obtained in this study indicate that (i) diverse microbial communities exist in Northern TPs, (ii) the functional potential of the peatland microorganisms is beneficial for contaminant removal in TPs and (iii) microorganisms in TPs are likely well-adapted to high contaminant concentrations as well as to the Northern climate.
PubMed ID
30137344 View in PubMed
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