Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Clinical measures, smoking, radon exposure, and risk of lung cancer in uranium miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210925
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Oct;53(10):697-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1996 Oct;53(10):697-702
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Radon - adverse effects
Regression Analysis
Silicosis - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Uranium
Abstract
Exposure to the radioactive daughters of radon is associated with increased risk of lung cancer in mining populations. An investigation of incidence of lung cancer following a clinical survey of Ontario uranium miners was undertaken to explore whether risk associated with radon is modified by factors including smoking, radiographic silicosis, clinical symptoms, the results of lung function testing, and the temporal pattern of radon exposure.
Miners were examined in 1974 by a respiratory questionnaire, tests of lung function, and chest radiography. A random selection of 733 (75%) of the original 973 participants was followed up by linkage to the Ontario Mortality and Cancer Registries.
Incidence of lung cancer was increased threefold. Risk of lung cancer among miners who had stopped smoking was half that of men who continued to smoke. There was no interaction between smoking and radon exposure. Men with lung function test results consistent with airways obstruction had an increased risk of lung cancer, even after adjustment for cigarette smoking. There was no association between radiographic silicosis and risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer was associated with exposures to radon daughters accumulated in a time window four to 14 years before diagnosis, but there was little association with exposures incurred earlier than 14 years before diagnosis. Among the men diagnosed with lung cancer, the mean and median dose rates were 2.6 working level months (WLM) a year and 1.8 WLM/year in the four to 14 year exposure window.
Risk of lung cancer associated with radon is modified by dose and time from exposure. Risk can be substantially decreased by stopping smoking.
Notes
Cites: J Occup Med. 1985 Sep;27(9):644-504045575
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Mar;15(1):134-73754239
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1990 Jan 15;45(1):26-332404878
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1990 Aug;132(2):265-742372006
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991 Aug;144(2):307-111859052
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Jan 1;152(1):37-437804920
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1993 Oct;50(10):920-88217852
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Aug 15;140(4):323-328059767
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1994 Aug 15;140(4):333-98059768
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Oct 8;309(6959):901-117755693
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993 Mar 17;85(6):422-38445662
PubMed ID
8943835 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occupational associations with lung cancer in two Ontario cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216300
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1995 Jan;27(1):127-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1995 Jan;27(1):127-36
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Death Certificates
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - economics - epidemiology - mortality
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Transportation
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A death certificate based case-control study of lung cancer in two Ontario cities was performed to estimate the risk of lung cancer attributable to occupation in Ontario, and to estimate the proportion of occupational lung cancers receiving compensation from the Workers' Compensation Board. Occupation and industry were identified from the death certificate. A priori occupations for analysis were those whose members had received compensation for occupational cancer from the Ontario Workers' Compensation Board. Population attributable risks were computed using the relative risks observed in this study and employment data from the 1986 Census of Canada. Subjects were all men (N = 967) between the ages of 45 and 75 years resident in the cities of Hamilton and Sault Ste-Marie who died of lung cancer from 1979 to 1988. Controls (2,821) were matched on age, year of death, and city of residence. In agreement with other studies, an increased risk of lung cancer was observed for workers in the construction sector, for miners, and for truck drivers. It was estimated that only a small proportion of lung cancers attributable to occupation are compensated in Ontario. It is believed that many occupational cancers go uncompensated because of the failure to file claims, rather than because claims are rejected by Compensation Boards. Physicians are in a position to advise patients about the possibility of compensable disease and to act as advocates for them. By recognizing compensable illness, physicians have the opportunity to ease the financial burden of patients and their families. The challenge is a difficult one, but it is well worth pursuing.
PubMed ID
7900730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Radiographic abnormalities and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to silica dust in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216360
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Jan 1;152(1):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1995
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Jan 1;152(1):37-43
Date
Jan-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Dust
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiography
Male
Mining
Mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - radiography
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Silicon Dioxide
Smoking
Abstract
To determine whether workers in Ontario who had been exposed to silica dust and who have radiographic abnormalities are at increased risk of lung cancer.
Cohort and case-control studies of rates of death from lung cancer and cancer incidence rates; data were obtained from the Ontario Silicosis Surveillance Registry. Follow-up was through linkage to the Ontario mortality and cancer registries.
Ontario.
A total of 523 workers with radiographic abnormalities and 1568 control subjects with normal radiographic findings who had been exposed to silica dust. Matching criteria were year of birth and the requirement that the control subject have a normal radiographic finding either later than or in the same year that the radiographic abnormality was identified in the silicosis subject.
Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and odds ratios for lung cancer.
In the cohort analysis, with the Ontario population rates as reference, the all-cause SMR was 0.96 among the workers with radiographic abnormalities and 0.51 among the control subjects. The corresponding SIRs for lung cancer were 2.49 and 0.87 (p
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1993 Oct;50(10):920-88217852
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1980;6 Suppl 2:1-867384772
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1992;22(2):147-531415283
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1991 Mar-Apr;46(2):82-92006898
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1990 Jan 15;45(1):26-332404878
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 May;46(5):289-912546576
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Sep;44(9):588-942959310
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1986 Mar;15(1):134-73754239
Cites: J Occup Med. 1982 Sep;24(9):663-76215474
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 May 15;152(10):1583-47743438
Comment In: CMAJ. 1995 May 15;152(10):1583; author reply 15847605472
PubMed ID
7804920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Silicosis surveillance in Ontario: detection rates, modifying factors, and screening intervals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218922
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Feb;25(2):257-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Health and Safety Studies Unit, Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Feb;25(2):257-66
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Metallurgy
Mining
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
The Province of Ontario has had a surveillance program for workers in dusty industries for almost 70 years. This paper reports the detection rates of silicosis among 68,701 silica-exposed individuals who were first exposed to dust in 1950 or later, and who were still employed in 1979 or later. The detection rate varied strongly with latency, being less than two new cases per 10,000 examinations during the first two decades from first exposure, reaching two new cases per 1,000 examinations at 27 years from first exposure, and averaging between two and four new cases per 1,000 examinations thereafter. The silicosis incidence rate among miners was only about half that among foundry workers. Cigarette smoking was also found to be a risk factor for the diagnosis of silicosis. These data were used to model the detection rate of new cases of silicosis as a function of the time interval between examinations, and results are presented for examination cycles between 2 and 10 years.
PubMed ID
8147398 View in PubMed
Less detail