Skip header and navigation

Refine By

8 records – page 1 of 1.

Classification of chest radiographs for pneumoconiosis: a comparison of two methods of reading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222647
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1992 Dec;49(12):869-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
D C Muir
C D Bernholz
W K Morgan
J O Roos
J. Chan
W. Maehle
J A Julian
A. Sebestyen
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1992 Dec;49(12):869-71
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung - pathology - radiography
Mining
Observer Variation
Ontario - epidemiology
Pneumoconiosis - epidemiology - pathology - radiography
Technology, Radiologic - methods
Notes
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):5-112750750
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1988;41(10):949-583057117
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1987 Aug;126(2):161-93300279
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1951 Jul;8(3):138-4914858773
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 1982;26(1-4):401-96295243
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1960 Oct;17:279-9213698433
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1966 Mar;12(3):314-305904510
PubMed ID
1472446 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pneumoconiosis in iron ore surface mining in Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232362
Source
J Occup Med. 1988 Oct;30(10):780-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
J R Martin
D C Muir
E. Moore
A C Edwards
M. Becklake
K W Morgan
H. Anderson
H. Edstrom
I E Rusted
J. Segovia
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada.
Source
J Occup Med. 1988 Oct;30(10):780-4
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Newfoundland and Labrador
Pneumoconiosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
A cross-sectional survey of the work force at an iron ore surface mine and beneficiation plant in Labrador identified cases with a radiologic diagnosis compatible with simple pneumoconiosis by the International Labour Organization (ILO) classification (1980). Their distribution by ILO categories 1, 2, and 3, after excluding those with confounding diagnoses for pneumoconiosis, was 30, 10, and 2 cases, respectively. ILO category was related to age, duration of current employment, and cumulative respirable dust and quartz levels, as well as to decrement in ventilatory function.
PubMed ID
3265950 View in PubMed
Less detail

Silica exposure and silicosis among Ontario hardrock miners: II. Exposure estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231559
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):13-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D K Verma
A. Sebestyen
J A Julian
D C Muir
H. Schmidt
C D Bernholz
H S Shannon
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):13-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Mining
Ontario
Silicosis - epidemiology
Abstract
An epidemiological investigation was carried out to determine the relationship between silicosis in hardrock miners in Ontario and cumulative exposure to silica (free crystalline silica--alpha quartz) dust. This second report describes a side-by-side air-sampling program used to derive a konimeter/gravimetric silica conversion curve. A total of 2,360 filter samples and 90,000 konimeter samples were taken over 2 years in two mines representing the ore types gold and uranium, both in existing conditions as well as in an experimental stope in which dry drilling was used to simulate the high dust conditions of the past. The method of calculating cumulative respirable silica exposure indices for each miner is reported.
PubMed ID
2750747 View in PubMed
Less detail

Silica exposure and silicosis among Ontario hardrock miners: III. Analysis and risk estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231558
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):29-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D C Muir
J A Julian
H S Shannon
D K Verma
A. Sebestyen
C D Bernholz
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):29-43
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure
Follow-Up Studies
Gold
Humans
Mining
Ontario
Pneumoconiosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Silicosis - epidemiology
Uranium
Abstract
An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the relationship between silicosis in hardrock miners in Ontario and cumulative exposure to silica (free crystalline silica--alpha quartz) dust. This report describes the analytic method and presents the risk estimates.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ind Med. 1990;17(2):277-802154097
Erratum In: Am J Ind Med 1990;17(2):281
Erratum In: Am J Ind Med 1991;19(4):555
PubMed ID
2750748 View in PubMed
Less detail

Silica exposure and silicosis among Ontario hardrock miners: I. Methodology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231557
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
D C Muir
H S Shannon
J A Julian
D K Verma
A. Sebestyen
C D Bernholz
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1989;16(1):5-11
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Mining
Ontario
Silicosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
An epidemiological investigation was undertaken to determine the relationship between silicosis in hardrock miners in Ontario and cumulative exposure to silica (crystalline silica--alpha quartz) dust. This first report describes the cohort, the method of classifying the radiographs, and the identification of a case of silicosis.
PubMed ID
2750750 View in PubMed
Less detail

A study of mortality in workers engaged in the mining, smelting, and refining of nickel. II: Mortality from cancer of the respiratory tract and kidney.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229706
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 1989 Dec;5(6):975-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
R S Roberts
J A Julian
D C Muir
H S Shannon
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 1989 Dec;5(6):975-93
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cohort Studies
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced - etiology - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - etiology - mortality
Male
Mining
Nickel - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper describes observed and expected mortality from cancers of the lung, larynx, nose, and kidney in a cohort of 54,509 nickel workers followed for 35 years. For analysis purposes the cohort was subdivided into men with and without service in one of the three high nickel dust areas of the operation: the Sinter Plants at Copper Cliff and Coniston, and the Leaching, Calcining and Sintering (LC&S) department at Port Colborne. At Copper Cliff Sinter Plant workers experienced three times the expected number of lung cancer deaths; the SMR rose steeply with increasing duration of service peaking at 943 with 10 to 15 years. A similar overall excess risk of lung cancer was seen in the smaller Coniston Sinter Plant again with an indication of an exposure risk gradient. Men in the LC&S department at Port Colborne also experienced a dose related excess risk of lung cancer death that rose to an SMR of 806 with 20 to 25 years of service. Nasal cancer deaths were increased at both the Copper Cliff Sinter Plant (6 deaths) and the LC&S department at Port Colborne (19 deaths), representing SMRs of 3,704 and 7,755, respectively, for this rare cancer. Laryngeal cancer and kidney cancer, both previously associated with nickel, were not in excess in these high risk groups. A further exploration of death from these causes in the lower exposure remainder of the cohort revealed an epidemiologically modest elevation in lung cancer death in miners (probably not nickel related) and parts of the Copper Refinery. No evidence of laryngeal cancer excess was found.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2626765 View in PubMed
Less detail

A study of mortality in workers engaged in the mining, smelting, and refining of nickel. I: Methodology and mortality by major cause groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229707
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 1989 Dec;5(6):957-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
R S Roberts
J A Julian
D. Sweezey
D C Muir
H S Shannon
E. Mastromatteo
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Toxicol Ind Health. 1989 Dec;5(6):957-74
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Worker Effect
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Nickel
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Following the publication of the NIOSH nickel criteria document in 1977, the Joint Occupational Health Committee of the International Nickel Company (INCO) commissioned a mortality study of the company's Ontario workforce. This paper describes the detailed methodology and primary mortality results of the ensuing study; subsequent papers will describe more detailed findings of cause-specific mortality. An historical prospective mortality study of approximately 54,000 INCO workers has been conducted. Men with six months or more of service were followed for mortality during a 35-year period by computerized record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. From a company-provided list of men known to have died and through independent follow-up of a random sample of 1,000 subjects of unknown status, we estimate a mortality ascertainment rate of 95%. Cause-specific standardized mortality ratios calculated with respect to Ontario provincial mortality rates indicate an excess of accidental deaths in men working in the Sudbury area and an excess of cancer deaths at the company's Port Colborne nickel refinery. A strong healthy worker effect was found for both all-disease mortality ad cancer mortality. The lower than expected mortality persisted for about 15 years beyond initial hiring.
PubMed ID
2626764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tentative explanatory variable of lung dust concentration in gold miners exposed to crystalline silica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205025
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Jul-Sep;8(3):375-98
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Dufresne
P. Loosereewanich
R. Bégin
C. Dion
D. Ecobichon
D C Muir
A C Ritchie
G. Perrault
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Department of Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, Montréal, Québec, Canada. cydu@musica.mcgill.ca
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Jul-Sep;8(3):375-98
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Gold
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lung Neoplasms - pathology
Male
Mining
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ontario
Quartz - adverse effects
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Silicosis - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The first objective of the study was to investigate the relationships between quantitative lung mineral dust burdens, dust exposure history, and pathological fibrosis grading in silicotic workers. The second objective was to evaluate the association between particle size parameters, concentration of retained silica particles and the severity of the silicosis. Sixty-seven paraffin-embedded lung tissue samples of silicotic patients were analyzed. The cases of silicosis included 39 non-lung cancer patients and 28 patients with lung cancer. All of the cases were gold miners in the Province of Ontario, Canada.
Particles, both angular and fibrous, were extracted from lung parenchyma by a bleach digestion method, mounted on copper microscopic grids by a carbon replica technique, and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Quartz concentration was also determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) on a silver membrane filter after the extraction from the lung parenchyma.
Total particles, silica, clay, and quartz also increase in concentration with increased age at death, although the trends are not statistically significant. Quartz concentration has a statistically significant correlation with the silicosis severity score (r = +0.45, p
PubMed ID
9679218 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.