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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: mortality 1976-88.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219707
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
J C McDonald
F D Liddell
A. Dufresne
A D McDonald
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Serpentine
Asbestosis - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of some 11,000 men born 1891-1920 and employed for at least one month in the chrysotile mines and mills of Quebec, was established in 1966 and has been followed ever since. Of the 5351 men surviving into 1976, only 16 could not be traced; 2508 were still alive in 1989, and 2827 had died; by the end of 1992 a further 698 were known to have died, giving an overall mortality of almost 80%. This paper presents the results of analysis of mortality for the period 1976 to 1988 inclusive, obtained by the subject-years method, with Quebec mortality for reference. In many respects the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) 20 years or more after first employment were similar to those for the period 1951-75--namely, all causes 1.07 (1951-75, 1.09); heart disease 1.02 (1.04); cerebrovascular disease 1.06 (1.07); external causes 1.17 (1.17). The SMR for lung cancer, however, rose from 1.25 to 1.39 and deaths from mesothelioma increased from eight (10 before review) to 25; deaths from respiratory tuberculosis fell from 57 to five. Among men whose exposure by age 55 was at least 300 million particles per cubic foot x years (mpcf.y), the SMR (all causes) was elevated in the two main mining regions, Asbestos and Thetford Mines, and for the small factory in Asbestos; so were the SMRs for lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and respiratory disease other than pneumoconiosis. Except for lung cancer, however, there was little convincing evidence of gradients over four classes of exposure, divided at 30, 100, and 300 mpcf.y. Over seven narrower categories of exposure up to 300 mpcf.y the SMR for lung cancer fluctuated around 1.27 with no indication of trend, but increased steeply above that level. Mortality form pneumoconiosis was strongly related to exposure, and the trend for mesothelioma was not dissimilar. Mortality generally was related systematically to cigarette smoking habit, recorded in life from 99% of survivors into 1976; smokers of 20 or more cigarettes a day had the highest SMRs not only for lung cancer but also for all causes, cancer of the stomach, pancreas, and larynx, and ischaemic heart disease. For lung cancer SMRs increased fivefold with smoking, but the increase with dust exposure was comparatively slight for non-smokers, lower again for ex-smokers, and negligible for smokers of at least 20 cigarettes a day; thus the asbestos-smoking interaction was less than multiplicative. Of the 33 deaths from mesothelioma in the cohort to date, 28 were in miners and millers and five were in employees of a small asbestos products factory where commercial amphiboles had also been used. Preliminary analysis also suggest that the risk of mesothelioma was higher in the mines and mills at Thetford Mines than in those at Asbestos. More detailed studies of these differences and of exposure-response relations for lung cancer are under way.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 Feb;37(1):11-247370189
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1982 Jan;45(1):124-357059455
Cites: Biometrics. 1983 Mar;39(1):173-846871346
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Jun;44(6):396-4013606968
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1979;330:91-116294225
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1992 Aug;49(8):566-751325180
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1971 Jun;22(6):677-865574010
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1972 Mar;24(3):189-975059627
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1991 Aug;48(8):543-71878311
PubMed ID
8280638 View in PubMed
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Fibers in lung tissues of mesothelioma cases among miners and millers of the township of Asbestos, Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215410
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1995 Apr;27(4):581-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
A. Dufresne
M. Harrigan
S. Massé
R. Bégin
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1995 Apr;27(4):581-92
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Asbestos, Amosite - analysis
Asbestos, Amphibole - analysis
Asbestos, Crocidolite - analysis
Asbestos, Serpentine - analysis
Culture Techniques
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemistry - etiology - pathology
Male
Mesothelioma - chemistry - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - etiology - pathology
Quebec
Textile Industry
Abstract
Twenty cases of mesothelioma among miners of the township of Asbestos, Quebec, Canada, have been reported. To further explore the mineral characteristics of various fibrous material, we studied the fibrous inorganic content of postmortem lung tissues of 12 of 20 available cases. In each case, we measured concentrations of chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite, talc-anthophyllite, and other fibrous minerals. The average diameter, length, and length-to-diameter ratio of each type of fiber were also calculated. For total fibers > 5 microns, we found > 1,000 asbestos fibers per mg tissue (f/mg) in all cases; tremolite was above 1,000 f/mg in 8 cases, chrysotile in 6 cases, crocidolite in 4 cases, and talc anthophyllite in 5 cases. Among cases with asbestos fibers, the tremolite count was highest in 7 cases, chrysotile in 3 cases, and crocidolite in 2 cases. The geometric mean concentrations of fibers > or = 5 microns were in the following decreasing order: tremolite > crocidolite > chrysotile > other fibers > talc-anthophyllite > amosite. For total fibers 1,000 fibers per mg tissue (f/mg) in all cases; tremolite was above 1,000 f/mg in 12 cases, chrysotile in 8 cases, crocidolite in 7 cases, and talc-anthophyllite in 6 cases. Tremolite was highest in 8 cases, chrysotile in 2 cases, and crocidolite and amosite in 2 cases. The geometric mean concentrations of fibers other fibers > chrysotile > crocidolite > talc-anthophyllite > amosite. We conclude, on the basis of the lung burden analyses of 12 mesothelioma cases from the Asbestos township of Quebec, that the imported amphibole (crocidolite and amosite) were the dominant fibers retained in the lung tissue in 2/12 cases. In 10/12 cases, fibers from the mine site (chrysotile and tremolite) were found at highest counts; tremolite was clearly the highest in 6, chrysotile in 2, and 2 cases had about the same counts for tremolite and chrysotile. If a relation of fiber burden-causality of mesothelioma is accepted, mesothelioma would be likely caused by amphibole contamination of the plant in 2/12 cases and by the mineral fibers (tremolite and chrysotile) from the mine site in the 10 other cases.
PubMed ID
7793429 View in PubMed
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Lung mineral fibers of former miners and millers from Thetford-Mines and asbestos regions: a comparative study of fiber concentration and dimension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195329
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;56(1):65-76
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Nayebzadeh
A. Dufresne
B. Case
H. Vali
A E Williams-Jones
R. Martin
C. Normand
J. Clark
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University Montreal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;56(1):65-76
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Amosite - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Asbestosis - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Autopsy
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Extraction and Processing Industry
Humans
Incidence
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects - analysis - classification
Mining
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Quebec - epidemiology
Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission
Abstract
Fiber dimension and concentration may vary substantially between two necropsy populations of former chrysotile miners and millers of Thetford-Mines and Asbestos regions. This possibility could explain, at least in part, the higher incidence of respiratory diseases among workers from Thetford-Mines than among workers from the Asbestos region. The authors used a transmission electron microscope, equipped with an x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer, to analyze lung mineral fibers of 86 subjects from the two mining regions and to classify fiber sizes into three categories. The most consistent difference was the higher concentration of tremolite in lung tissues of workers from Thetford-Mines, compared with workers from the Asbestos region. Amosite and crocidolite were also detected in lung tissues of several workers from the Asbestos region. No consistent and biologically important difference was found for fiber dimension; therefore, fiber dimension does not seem to be a factor that accounts for the difference in incidence of respiratory diseases between the two groups. The greater incidence of respiratory diseases among workers of Thetford-Mines can be explained by the fact that they had greater exposure to fibers than did workers at the Asbestos region. Among the mineral fibers studied, retention of tremolite fibers was most apparent.
PubMed ID
11256859 View in PubMed
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Tentative explanatory variable of lung dust concentration in gold miners exposed to crystalline silica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205025
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Jul-Sep;8(3):375-98
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Dufresne
P. Loosereewanich
R. Bégin
C. Dion
D. Ecobichon
D C Muir
A C Ritchie
G. Perrault
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Department of Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, Montréal, Québec, Canada. cydu@musica.mcgill.ca
Source
J Expo Anal Environ Epidemiol. 1998 Jul-Sep;8(3):375-98
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Gold
Humans
Lung - pathology
Lung Neoplasms - pathology
Male
Mining
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Ontario
Quartz - adverse effects
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Silicosis - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The first objective of the study was to investigate the relationships between quantitative lung mineral dust burdens, dust exposure history, and pathological fibrosis grading in silicotic workers. The second objective was to evaluate the association between particle size parameters, concentration of retained silica particles and the severity of the silicosis. Sixty-seven paraffin-embedded lung tissue samples of silicotic patients were analyzed. The cases of silicosis included 39 non-lung cancer patients and 28 patients with lung cancer. All of the cases were gold miners in the Province of Ontario, Canada.
Particles, both angular and fibrous, were extracted from lung parenchyma by a bleach digestion method, mounted on copper microscopic grids by a carbon replica technique, and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Quartz concentration was also determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) on a silver membrane filter after the extraction from the lung parenchyma.
Total particles, silica, clay, and quartz also increase in concentration with increased age at death, although the trends are not statistically significant. Quartz concentration has a statistically significant correlation with the silicosis severity score (r = +0.45, p
PubMed ID
9679218 View in PubMed
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