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9 records – page 1 of 1.

[Cobalt mining factory--diagnoses 1822-32]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72158
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Dec 10;119(30):4544-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1999
Author
T V Løvold
L. Haugsbø
Author Affiliation
lovold@ulrik.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Dec 10;119(30):4544-6
Date
Dec-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Bacterial Infections - history
Cobalt
Disease Outbreaks - history
English Abstract
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Mining - history
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - history
Respiratory Tract Diseases - history
Abstract
The cobalt mining company at Modum in Norway had its own health service. The doctors kept records of all patient contacts. Recently discovered material from the 1822-32 period shows that gastrointestinal diseases, injuries and respiratory diseases made up the majority of patient contacts, in addition to unspecified infections.
PubMed ID
10827501 View in PubMed
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[Environmental health and industrial pollution in the 1890s]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49194
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2001
Author
A. Storesund
F. Rønning
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Oslo Postboks 1130 Blindern 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Dec 10;121(30):3561-5
Date
Dec-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry - history
English Abstract
Environmental Health - history
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - history
Environmental Pollution - adverse effects - history - prevention & control
History, 19th Century
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Mining - history
Norway
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pollution from industry assumed new dimensions when large-scale industry and mining were established in Norway towards the end of the nineteenth century. The present article discusses how the local health administration responded to the first extensive industrial pollution of air and water. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two chemical factories producing wood pulp and one abandoned nickel mine are studied by means of information from court records and municipal archives. RESULTS: New forms of large quantity pollutants and their great spreading capacity were not anticipated in the Health Act of 1860. The legislation at the time had ambiguous points which made it difficult to apply in cases of industrial pollution. One major problem was reliable documentation of adverse health effects. INTERPRETATION: Neither central nor local medical authorities had adequate competence to exert the professional influence required. In spite of this, local health commissions acted with considerable authority in the early 1890s. Within a few years, however, the health aspects were down-played because of the strong economic and political interests behind the new industries. The principal difficulties emerging in the 1890s with industrial pollution eventually lasted for nearly one hundred years.
PubMed ID
11808018 View in PubMed
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[Finally school provisions for continental shelf nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238568
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Jul 5;72(12):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-5-1985
Author
J. Bjørkvik
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Jul 5;72(12):14-5
Date
Jul-5-1985
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Fuel Oils
Humans
Mining
Norway
Occupational Health Nursing - education
Petroleum
PubMed ID
3848176 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Dec 10;118(30):4691-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1998
Author
K. Hunstadbråten
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Dec 10;118(30):4691-2
Date
Dec-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
History of Dentistry
History, 19th Century
Humans
Mining - history
Mouth Diseases - history
Norway
Occupational Health Services - history
Tooth Diseases - history
Tooth Extraction - history
Toothache - history
Abstract
Major Norwegian 19th-century mines had their own company physicians. Some of their reports and the mine sick-lists have been kept. From the Modum Blue Colour Works we have more than 80 such reports or sick-lists (each covering a four-week mining period) from 1823 to 1839. Of a total of 8,798 patients, 67 (0.8%) were diagnosed as suffering from odontalgia. The treatment was extraction or medication. Patients who underwent tooth extraction had fewer subsequent sick-days than those who were only given medication. Other registrated dental or oral disorders included dental abscess, caries, dental cancer with growth on the gums, thrush, dentition, dental fever and scorbutus.
PubMed ID
9914754 View in PubMed
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[NSF (Norwegian Nurses' Association) is committed to the continental shelf. Interview by Jofrid Bjørkvik].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239156
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Feb 20;72(4):16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1985
Author
A. Bjelland
Source
Sykepleien. 1985 Feb 20;72(4):16-7
Date
Feb-20-1985
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fuel Oils
Humans
Mining
Norway
Occupational Health Nursing
Petroleum
Societies, Nursing
PubMed ID
3847200 View in PubMed
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Occupational health examinations of patients in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287482
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 08 22;137(14-15)
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-22-2017
Author
Lisa Aarhus
Ingrid Sivesind Mehlum
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 08 22;137(14-15)
Date
08-22-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Insurance, Disability
Irritants - adverse effects
Male
Manufacturing Industry
Middle Aged
Mining
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
In 2009, the hospital departments of occupational medicine and the National Institute of Occupational Health established a joint, anonymous examination register. The objective was to achieve a better overview of occupational health examinations of patients in Norway, including changes in occupationally related exposure and illness over time.
After the patient consultation the examining doctor completes a form, which is subsequently registered electronically. This article is based on analyses of patient examinations registered in the period 2010?–?2015.
A total of 8 775 patient examinations had been recorded. The majority of those examined were men (75?%) and the most commonly occurring age group was 50?–?69 years (52?%). The most frequent exposures involved irritants/allergens (18?%) and organic solvents (15?%), which were recorded in a slightly increasing and slightly declining frequency respectively through the period. Manufacturing and mining were the top industries (30?%). The most common symptom organs were the lungs/respiratory tract (57?%), with asthma, COPD and lung cancer as the most frequent diagnoses. The proportion of cases that were deemed to be likely or possibly related to work remained stable at 40?% and 23?% respectively. At the time of the examination altogether 16?% of the patients were receiving sickness benefit, 10?% were receiving work assessment allowance and 13?% disability benefit.
Occupationally related illness entails significant consequences for individuals as well as society. The examination register provides a good overview of the patient examinations in the occupational health departments in Norway and may reveal changes in occupationally related exposure over time. In this way, the register may contribute to targeted preventive efforts.
PubMed ID
28828846 View in PubMed
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[Silicosis examination and prophylactic measures in a Norwegian mining operation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255921
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1971 Dec 30;91(35):2545-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-1971

[The Kings Bay accident, November 5, 1962]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6308
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Jun 30;109(19-21):1974-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1989
Author
R. Hanoa
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Jun 30;109(19-21):1974-81
Date
Jun-30-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - legislation & jurisprudence - mortality
Blast Injuries - mortality
Coal Mining
Disaster Planning - legislation & jurisprudence
English Abstract
Explosions
Humans
Male
Svalbard
Abstract
The Kings Bay Coal Company at Spitzbergen was taken over by the Norwegian government in 1933. The rough arctic conditions caused many difficulties. Over the years, the coal mine had already experienced some explosions when the disaster struck in 1962. 21 miners were killed. The disaster was investigated by two governmental commissions. Little by little, more and more attention was paid to the fact that the employer and owner was the government. The final commission accused the employer of violating the working environment and safety regulations. The disaster was debated in the Norwegian parliament in 1963. The Labour Government had to resign on a vote of no confidence. But what was the working environment at Kings Bay like? Were the accusations of violations of regulations substantiated? The direct cause of the disastrous explosion has never been identified.
PubMed ID
2749685 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.