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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: development from 1904 and mortality to 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210233
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F D Liddell
A D McDonald
J C McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Montreal, Canada.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):13-36
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Asbestosis - etiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - etiology - mortality
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper draws together the mortality experience for a cohort of some 11000 male Quebec Chrysotile miners and millers, reported at intervals since 1971 and now again updated. Of the 10918 men in the complete cohort, 1138 were lost to view, almost all never traced after employment of only a month or two before 1935; the other 9780 men were traced into 1992. Of these, 8009 (82%) are known to have died: 657 from lung cancer, 38 from mesotheliona, 1205 from other malignant disease, 108 from pneumoconiosis and 561 from other non-malignant respiratory diseases (excluding tuberculosis). After early fluctuations. SMRs (all causes) against Quebec rates have been reasonably steady since about 1945. For men first employed in Asbestos, mine or factory, they were very much what might have been expected for a blue collar population without any hazardous exposure. SMRs in the Thetford Mines area were almost 8% higher, but in line with anecdotal evidence concerning socio-economic status. At exposures below 300 (million particles per cubic foot) x years, (mpcf.y), equivalent to roughly 1000 (fibres/ml) x years-or, say, 10 years in the 1940s at 80 (fibres/ml)-findings were as follows. There were no discernible associations of degree of exposure and SMRs, whether for all causes of death or for all the specific cancer sites examined. The average SMRs were 1.07 (all causes), and 1.16, 0.93, 1.03 and 1.21, respectively, for gastric, other abdominal, laryngeal and lung cancer. Men whose exposures were less then 300 mpcf.y suffered almost one-half of the 146 deaths from pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma; the elimination of these two causes would have reduced these men's SMR (all causes) from 1.07 to approximately 1.06. Thus it is concluded from the viewpoint of mortality that exposure in this industry to less than 300 mpcf.y has been essentially innocuous, although there was a small risk or pneumoconiosis or mesothelioma. Higher exposures have, however, led to excesses, increasing with degree of exposure, of mortality from all causes, and from lung cancer and stomach cancer, but such exposures, of at least 300 mpcf.y, are several orders of magnitude more severe than any that have been seen for many years. The effects of cigarette smoking were much more deleterious than those of dust exposure, not only for lung cancer (the SMR for smokers of 20+ cigarettes a day being 4.6 times higher than that for non-smokers), but also for stomach cancer (2.0 times higher), laryngeal cancer (2.9 times higher), and-most importantly-for all causes (1.6 times higher).
Notes
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 1997 Jan;41(1):3-129072948
Comment In: Ann Occup Hyg. 2001 Jun;45(4):329-35; author reply 336-811414250
PubMed ID
9072947 View in PubMed
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The 1891-1920 birth cohort of Quebec chrysotile miners and millers: mortality 1976-88.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219707
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
J C McDonald
F D Liddell
A. Dufresne
A D McDonald
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Dec;50(12):1073-81
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos, Serpentine
Asbestosis - mortality
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Exposure
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
A cohort of some 11,000 men born 1891-1920 and employed for at least one month in the chrysotile mines and mills of Quebec, was established in 1966 and has been followed ever since. Of the 5351 men surviving into 1976, only 16 could not be traced; 2508 were still alive in 1989, and 2827 had died; by the end of 1992 a further 698 were known to have died, giving an overall mortality of almost 80%. This paper presents the results of analysis of mortality for the period 1976 to 1988 inclusive, obtained by the subject-years method, with Quebec mortality for reference. In many respects the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) 20 years or more after first employment were similar to those for the period 1951-75--namely, all causes 1.07 (1951-75, 1.09); heart disease 1.02 (1.04); cerebrovascular disease 1.06 (1.07); external causes 1.17 (1.17). The SMR for lung cancer, however, rose from 1.25 to 1.39 and deaths from mesothelioma increased from eight (10 before review) to 25; deaths from respiratory tuberculosis fell from 57 to five. Among men whose exposure by age 55 was at least 300 million particles per cubic foot x years (mpcf.y), the SMR (all causes) was elevated in the two main mining regions, Asbestos and Thetford Mines, and for the small factory in Asbestos; so were the SMRs for lung cancer, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and respiratory disease other than pneumoconiosis. Except for lung cancer, however, there was little convincing evidence of gradients over four classes of exposure, divided at 30, 100, and 300 mpcf.y. Over seven narrower categories of exposure up to 300 mpcf.y the SMR for lung cancer fluctuated around 1.27 with no indication of trend, but increased steeply above that level. Mortality form pneumoconiosis was strongly related to exposure, and the trend for mesothelioma was not dissimilar. Mortality generally was related systematically to cigarette smoking habit, recorded in life from 99% of survivors into 1976; smokers of 20 or more cigarettes a day had the highest SMRs not only for lung cancer but also for all causes, cancer of the stomach, pancreas, and larynx, and ischaemic heart disease. For lung cancer SMRs increased fivefold with smoking, but the increase with dust exposure was comparatively slight for non-smokers, lower again for ex-smokers, and negligible for smokers of at least 20 cigarettes a day; thus the asbestos-smoking interaction was less than multiplicative. Of the 33 deaths from mesothelioma in the cohort to date, 28 were in miners and millers and five were in employees of a small asbestos products factory where commercial amphiboles had also been used. Preliminary analysis also suggest that the risk of mesothelioma was higher in the mines and mills at Thetford Mines than in those at Asbestos. More detailed studies of these differences and of exposure-response relations for lung cancer are under way.
Notes
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1980 Feb;37(1):11-247370189
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1982 Jan;45(1):124-357059455
Cites: Biometrics. 1983 Mar;39(1):173-846871346
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Jun;44(6):396-4013606968
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1979;330:91-116294225
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1992 Aug;49(8):566-751325180
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1971 Jun;22(6):677-865574010
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1972 Mar;24(3):189-975059627
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1991 Aug;48(8):543-71878311
PubMed ID
8280638 View in PubMed
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The 1978-79 INCO workers' strike in the Sudbury basin and its impact on alcohol consumption and drinking patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243374
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1982 Mar;3(1):22-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
N. Giesbrecht
G. Markle
S. Macdonald
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1982 Mar;3(1):22-38
Date
Mar-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Behavior
Humans
Income
Mining
Ontario
Stress, Psychological
Strikes, Employee
PubMed ID
7085867 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of Canadian health administrative databases in identifying patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a validation study using the medical records of rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114676
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jessica Widdifield
Sasha Bernatsky
J Michael Paterson
Karen Tu
Ryan Ng
J Carter Thorne
Janet E Pope
Claire Bombardier
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1582-91
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - epidemiology
Data Mining - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Fees and Charges - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatology - statistics & numerical data
Single-Payer System - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health administrative data can be a valuable tool for disease surveillance and research. Few studies have rigorously evaluated the accuracy of administrative databases for identifying rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Our aim was to validate administrative data algorithms to identify RA patients in Ontario, Canada.
We performed a retrospective review of a random sample of 450 patients from 18 rheumatology clinics. Using rheumatologist-reported diagnosis as the reference standard, we tested and validated different combinations of physician billing, hospitalization, and pharmacy data.
One hundred forty-nine rheumatology patients were classified as having RA and 301 were classified as not having RA based on our reference standard definition (study RA prevalence 33%). Overall, algorithms that included physician billings had excellent sensitivity (range 94-100%). Specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were modest to excellent and increased when algorithms included multiple physician claims or specialist claims. The addition of RA medications did not significantly improve algorithm performance. The algorithm of "(1 hospitalization RA code ever) OR (3 physician RA diagnosis codes [claims] with =1 by a specialist in a 2-year period)" had a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 85%, PPV of 76%, and negative predictive value of 98%. Most RA patients (84%) had an RA diagnosis code present in the administrative data within ±1 year of a rheumatologist's documented diagnosis date.
We demonstrated that administrative data can be used to identify RA patients with a high degree of accuracy. RA diagnosis date and disease duration are fairly well estimated from administrative data in jurisdictions of universal health care insurance.
PubMed ID
23592598 View in PubMed
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Addressing arsenic bioaccessibility in ecological risk assessment: a novel approach to avoid overestimating risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91571
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Ollson Christopher A
Koch Iris
Smith Paula
Knopper Loren D
Hough Chris
Reimer Ken J
Author Affiliation
Jacques Whitford, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arsenic - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Biological Availability
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Industrial Waste
Mining
Northwest Territories
Peromyscus
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Trees
Abstract
The risk of arsenic exposure to deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) living in areas of naturally and anthropogenically elevated arsenic levels was determined using three separate calculations of arsenic daily intake: Estimated daily intake (EDI), bioaccessible EDI (BEDI), and actual daily intake (ADI). The present work is of particular interest, because the risk assessments were determined for animals naturally exposed to arsenic. Gastric fluid extraction was used to obtain bioaccessibility data for soil and plant samples collected from three study sites (background, mine forest, and tailings) in Yellowknife (NT, Canada). Calculations using the EDI indicated that deer mice living in tailings habitat (average soil arsenic concentration, 1,740 +/- 2,240 microg/g) should have been experiencing serious health effects as a result of their exposure to arsenic. Using BEDI and ADI in the risk assessment calculation, however, resulted in an order-of-magnitude decrease in calculated risk. In addition, results calculated using the BEDI and ADI were not significantly different, suggesting that using bioaccessibility provides a more realistic estimate of potential risk. The present results provide evidence that the use of EDI in traditional risk assessments may seriously overestimate the actual risk, which in some instances may result in expensive and unnecessary clean-up measures.
PubMed ID
18939889 View in PubMed
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Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
Less detail

The age-related risk of occupational accidents: the case of Swedish iron-ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211973
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
E. Menckel
L. Lundholm
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 May;28(3):349-57
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The paper examines age-related accident risks faced by Swedish male iron-ore miners. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of national registers was conducted over a ten-year period using three times periods of five years and five age categories. Age-related accident frequency, characteristics and severity were examined. High accident ratios were rare among older miners whatever the time period, but some accident patterns became substantially more frequent in some older age cohorts over the years. Injuries tended to be more severe in older age groups, all accidents aggregated as well as by accident pattern. It is concluded that inequality in risk exposure between age groups may explain the lower accident ratios found among older workers, but also that the aging of a working population may lead to the application of task-assignment principles that penalize older workers, at least with regard to certain specific accident risks.
PubMed ID
8799439 View in PubMed
Less detail

All-time releases of mercury to the atmosphere from human activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129775
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Dec 15;45(24):10485-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2011
Author
David G Streets
Molly K Devane
Zifeng Lu
Tami C Bond
Elsie M Sunderland
Daniel J Jacob
Author Affiliation
Decision and Information Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States. dstreets@anl.gov
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Dec 15;45(24):10485-91
Date
Dec-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Atmosphere - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Power Plants - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Understanding the biogeochemical cycling of mercury is critical for explaining the presence of mercury in remote regions of the world, such as the Arctic and the Himalayas, as well as local concentrations. While we have good knowledge of present-day fluxes of mercury to the atmosphere, we have little knowledge of what emission levels were like in the past. Here we develop a trend of anthropogenic emissions of mercury to the atmosphere from 1850 to 2008-for which relatively complete data are available-and supplement that trend with an estimate of anthropogenic emissions prior to 1850. Global mercury emissions peaked in 1890 at 2600 Mg yr(-1), fell to 700-800 Mg yr(-1) in the interwar years, then rose steadily after 1950 to present-day levels of 2000 Mg yr(-1). Our estimate for total mercury emissions from human activities over all time is 350 Gg, of which 39% was emitted before 1850 and 61% after 1850. Using an eight-compartment global box-model of mercury biogeochemical cycling, we show that these emission trends successfully reproduce present-day atmospheric enrichment in mercury.
Notes
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2002 Jun 1;36(11):2303-1012075781
Cites: Chemosphere. 2002 Jul;48(1):51-712137057
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2003 Jan 1;37(1):22-3112542286
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2003 Dec;5(6):935-4914710936
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2006 Sep 1;40(17):5312-816999104
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Mar 15;45(6):2042-721355558
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2008 Aug 15;42(16):5971-718767653
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2009 Apr 15;43(8):2983-819475981
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Jun 2;106(22):8830-419451629
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Apr 15;44(8):2918-2420345131
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2010 Nov 15;44(22):8574-8020973542
Cites: Environ Sci Technol. 2007 Nov 15;41(22):7632-818075067
PubMed ID
22070723 View in PubMed
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Alternative waste residue materials for passive in situ prevention of sulfide-mine tailings oxidation: a field evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257398
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2014 Feb 28;267:245-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2014
Author
Peter Nason
Raymond H Johnson
Clara Neuschütz
Lena Alakangas
Björn Öhlander
Author Affiliation
Division of Geosciences and Waste Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.nason@ltu.se.
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2014 Feb 28;267:245-54
Date
Feb-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Ash - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Industrial Waste - analysis
Metals - analysis - chemistry
Mining
Oxidation-Reduction
Sewage - analysis
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Sulfides - chemistry
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Novel solutions for sulfide-mine tailings remediation were evaluated in field-scale experiments on a former tailings repository in northern Sweden. Uncovered sulfide-tailings were compared to sewage-sludge biosolid amended tailings over 2 years. An application of a 0.2m single-layer sewage-sludge amendment was unsuccessful at preventing oxygen ingress to underlying tailings. It merely slowed the sulfide-oxidation rate by 20%. In addition, sludge-derived metals (Cu, Ni, Fe, and Zn) migrated and precipitated at the tailings-to-sludge interface. By using an additional 0.6m thick fly-ash sealing layer underlying the sewage sludge layer, a solution to mitigate oxygen transport to the underlying tailings and minimize sulfide-oxidation was found. The fly-ash acted as a hardened physical barrier that prevented oxygen diffusion and provided a trap for sludge-borne metals. Nevertheless, the biosolid application hampered the application, despite the advances in the effectiveness of the fly-ash layer, as sludge-borne nitrate leached through the cover system into the underlying tailings, oxidizing pyrite. This created a 0.3m deep oxidized zone in 6-years. This study highlights that using sewage sludge in unconventional cover systems is not always a practical solution for the remediation of sulfide-bearing mine tailings to mitigate against sulfide weathering and acid rock drainage formation.
PubMed ID
24462894 View in PubMed
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Analysing factors related to slipping, stumbling, and falling accidents at work: Application of data mining methods to Finnish occupational accidents and diseases statistics database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121789
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):215-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Noora Nenonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Industrial Management, Center for Safety Management and Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 541, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. noora.nenonen@tut.fi
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):215-24
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Data Mining
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Workplace
Wounds and Injuries - etiology
Abstract
The utilisation of data mining methods has become common in many fields. In occupational accident analysis, however, these methods are still rarely exploited. This study applies methods of data mining (decision tree and association rules) to the Finnish national occupational accidents and diseases statistics database to analyse factors related to slipping, stumbling, and falling (SSF) accidents at work from 2006 to 2007. SSF accidents at work constitute a large proportion (22%) of all accidents at work in Finland. In addition, they are more likely to result in longer periods of incapacity for work than other workplace accidents. The most important factor influencing whether or not an accident at work is related to SSF is the specific physical activity of movement. In addition, the risk of SSF accidents at work seems to depend on the occupation and the age of the worker. The results were in line with previous research. Hence the application of data mining methods was considered successful. The results did not reveal anything unexpected though. Nevertheless, because of the capability to illustrate a large dataset and relationships between variables easily, data mining methods were seen as a useful supplementary method in analysing occupational accident data.
PubMed ID
22877702 View in PubMed
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432 records – page 1 of 44.