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132 records – page 1 of 14.

[Accumulation of heavy metals in biologic materials of mining workers and of nearby population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176713
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
M A Mukasheva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(11):38-40
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Hair - chemistry
Humans
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - metabolism
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The article contains results concerning spectral analysis of biologic materials (blood and hair) for heavy metals content. These results helped to reveal health risk factors for workers engaged into chromium ores extraction and for nearby residents.
PubMed ID
15636126 View in PubMed
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[A concept of prophylaxis for occupational diseases in the Kemerovo region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187435
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(10):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
N I Surkov
V A Zenkov
T I Shvets
S P Voroshilov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(10):14-7
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Coal Mining
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors represented integral evaluation of sanitary and epidemiologic well-being of people residing in coal miner towns. This evaluation plays an important role in formation of general including children's, occupational and infectious morbidity.
PubMed ID
12474276 View in PubMed
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[Activities of the regional occupational health center under present-day conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187073
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(11):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
I N Piktushanskaia
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(11):25-30
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Mining
European Union
Humans
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - manpower - trends
Physical Examination
Pneumoconiosis - diagnosis - prevention & control
Russia
USSR
Abstract
The authors represented experience of contemporary activities of Occupational center in Rostov region, demonstrated efficiency of thorough medical examinations carried by mobile clinical and diagnostic laboratories, suggested 4-levels structure of occupational service organization.
PubMed ID
12520907 View in PubMed
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[Actual problems of occupational and environmental hygiene in coal miner towns].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187439
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(10):4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
V A Zenkov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(10):4-6
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Coal Mining
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The authors present priority directions of occupational diseases prevention nowadays in Kouzbass.
PubMed ID
12474272 View in PubMed
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Addressing arsenic bioaccessibility in ecological risk assessment: a novel approach to avoid overestimating risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91571
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Ollson Christopher A
Koch Iris
Smith Paula
Knopper Loren D
Hough Chris
Reimer Ken J
Author Affiliation
Jacques Whitford, Burlington, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2009 Mar;28(3):668-75
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arsenic - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Biological Availability
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Industrial Waste
Mining
Northwest Territories
Peromyscus
Risk assessment
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - pharmacokinetics
Trees
Abstract
The risk of arsenic exposure to deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) living in areas of naturally and anthropogenically elevated arsenic levels was determined using three separate calculations of arsenic daily intake: Estimated daily intake (EDI), bioaccessible EDI (BEDI), and actual daily intake (ADI). The present work is of particular interest, because the risk assessments were determined for animals naturally exposed to arsenic. Gastric fluid extraction was used to obtain bioaccessibility data for soil and plant samples collected from three study sites (background, mine forest, and tailings) in Yellowknife (NT, Canada). Calculations using the EDI indicated that deer mice living in tailings habitat (average soil arsenic concentration, 1,740 +/- 2,240 microg/g) should have been experiencing serious health effects as a result of their exposure to arsenic. Using BEDI and ADI in the risk assessment calculation, however, resulted in an order-of-magnitude decrease in calculated risk. In addition, results calculated using the BEDI and ADI were not significantly different, suggesting that using bioaccessibility provides a more realistic estimate of potential risk. The present results provide evidence that the use of EDI in traditional risk assessments may seriously overestimate the actual risk, which in some instances may result in expensive and unnecessary clean-up measures.
PubMed ID
18939889 View in PubMed
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[Age-related structure of miners population in dependence on work conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95109
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(7):40-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Maksimov S A
Maksimova E V
Mazur Iu N
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(7):40-4
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Humans
Middle Aged
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Morbidity - trends
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The authors analyzed age-related structure of miners population in major occupational groups with connection to special work conditions in one mine of Kouzbass. The data obtained prove certain influence of work conditions on age-related structure of occupational population.
PubMed ID
19718836 View in PubMed
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[Ambient air pollution in naturally doped ore processing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194280
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2001;(3):42-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001

Analysis of fatalities and injuries involving mining equipment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161185
Source
J Safety Res. 2007;38(4):461-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
W A Groves
V J Kecojevic
D. Komljenovic
Author Affiliation
The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, 110 Hosler Building, University Park, PA 16802-5000, USA. wag10@psu.edu
Source
J Safety Res. 2007;38(4):461-70
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Despite significant reductions, the number of injuries and fatalities in mining remains high. A persistent area of concern continues to be equipment-related incidents.
Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and Current Population Survey (CPS) data were used to examine equipment-related injuries over the period 1995-2004. Incidents were reviewed to determine which types of mining equipment were most often involved and to identify and characterize trends.
Non-powered hand tools was the equipment category most often involved with non-fatal injuries while off-road ore haulage was the most common source of fatalities.
Younger employees had an elevated risk of injury while workers >55 years had an elevated risk for fatality. A large majority of incidents involve workers with
PubMed ID
17884433 View in PubMed
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An inventory of historical mercury emissions in maritime canada: implications for present and future contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197892
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 22;256(1):39-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-22-2000
Author
E M Sunderlan
G L Chmura
Author Affiliation
School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada. ems@sfu.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jun 22;256(1):39-57
Date
Jun-22-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Forecasting
Fossil Fuels
Humans
Industry
Mercury - analysis
Mining
Refuse Disposal
Abstract
Mercury is a longstanding concern in Maritime Canada due to high levels of contamination in a number of fish and bird species. The recycled component of past releases of anthropogenic mercury may be a significant source of ongoing pollution in many areas. Historical information on mercury releases can be used to quantify past and present anthropogenic contamination. We present an inventory of historical mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources in Maritime Canada for the years 1800-1995. Long-term trends in mercury emissions and the significance of the cumulative burden of mercury released from local sources are discussed. Emissions are calculated using both historical monitoring data and the application of emission factors. The nature of current anthropogenic sources of mercury is quite different than it was several decades ago when many of the existing policies governing mercury pollution were created. Our inventory illustrates that many of the most significant sources in the past such as the chlor-alkali industry, paint containing mercury additives, and pharmaceuticals, have been largely phased out with fossil fuel combustion and waste disposal remaining as the most significant modern sources. Atmospheric emissions in Maritime Canada peaked in 1945 (> 1,750 kg year-1), and again between 1965 and 1970 (> 2,600 kg year-1). Cumulative releases of mercury from anthropogenic sources for the years 1800-1995 were between 115 and 259 t to the atmosphere alone, and 327-448 t when discharges to wastewater and effluents were included. Assuming that only 0.2% (Nriagu, 1994.) of these releases become part of the recycled fraction of current fluxes, we estimate that between 570 and 900 kg Hg year-1 is deposited in Maritime Canada from past anthropogenic sources. Modern sources within Maritime Canada contribute at least 405 kg year-1 to the total annual deposition of 1.71 t over the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, leaving approximately 735 kg year-1 from natural sources and long-range contamination. Further study is needed to verify these estimates and clarify the significance of natural and long-range sources of mercury in Maritime Canada.
PubMed ID
10898386 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropogenic metal enrichment of snow and soil in north-eastern European Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187421
Source
Environ Pollut. 2003;121(1):11-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
T R Walker
S D Young
P D Crittenden
H. Zhang
Author Affiliation
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Nottingham, University Park, UK.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2003;121(1):11-21
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coal Mining
Environmental pollution
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Industrial Waste
Metals - analysis
Russia
Snow
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Abstract
Trace metal composition of winter snowpack, snow-melt filter residues and top-soil samples were determined along three transects through industrial towns in the Usa basin, North-East Russia: Inta, Usinsk and Vorkuta. Snow was analysed for Ag, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn using ICP-MS (Ca and K by F-AAS for Vorkuta only), pH and acidity/alkalinity. Filter residues were analysed for: Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cu, K, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn using F-AAS and GF-AAS; top-soil samples were analysed for Ba, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Zn using F-AAS. Results indicate elevated concentrations of elements associated with alkaline combustion ash around the coal mining towns of Vorkuta and Inta. There is little evidence of deposition around the gas and oil town of Usinsk. Atmospheric deposition in the vicinity of Vorkuta, and to a lesser extent Inta, added significantly to the soil contaminant loading as a result of ash fallout. Acid deposition was associated with pristine areas whereas alkaline combustion ash near to emission sources more than compensated for the acidity caused by SO2.
PubMed ID
12475056 View in PubMed
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132 records – page 1 of 14.