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171 records – page 1 of 18.

The 1978-79 INCO workers' strike in the Sudbury basin and its impact on alcohol consumption and drinking patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243374
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1982 Mar;3(1):22-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
N. Giesbrecht
G. Markle
S. Macdonald
Source
J Public Health Policy. 1982 Mar;3(1):22-38
Date
Mar-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Behavior
Humans
Income
Mining
Ontario
Stress, Psychological
Strikes, Employee
PubMed ID
7085867 View in PubMed
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[A follow-up study registered, occupational skin diseases in an iron mine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244572
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1981
Author
A. Thörn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1981 Apr 15;78(16):1657-8
Date
Apr-15-1981
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iron
Mining
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
6452559 View in PubMed
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[Air dust level in the cabins of excavators at the Borodinskii coal-stripping section of the Kansk-Achinsk Fuel and Energy complex].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237454
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1986 Feb;(2):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1986

Arduousness of work, career, and disability pensioning of Finnish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241313
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1984;12(2):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
I. Kuorinka
M. Nurminen
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1984;12(2):69-74
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disabled Persons
Finland
Humans
Iron
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations
Physical Exertion
Retirement
Statistics as Topic
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
The career and work arduousness of a population of retired iron ore miners and their contemporaries who continued to work were investigated to find out what aspects of work history were associated with disability pensioning. The retired group had entered the mining industry at a more advanced age than the referents. The retired miners had also started at more strenuous tasks. Later they changed to lighter tasks, but were less often promoted in their career. The risk of early retirement seems thus to be related to the essential indicators of one's progress in the mining vocation.
PubMed ID
6235578 View in PubMed
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Biomedical surveillance: rights conflict with rights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236478
Source
J Occup Med. 1986 Oct;28(10):958-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
G. Atherley
N. Johnston
M. Tennassee
Source
J Occup Med. 1986 Oct;28(10):958-65
Date
Oct-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aviation
Biomedical research
Canada
Civil Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure
Ethics
Government Regulation
Humans
Lead
Mandatory Programs
Mass Screening - legislation & jurisprudence
Mining
Monitoring, Physiologic
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Research Subjects
Risk assessment
Uranium
Abstract
Medical screening and biomedical monitoring violate individual rights. Such conflicts of right with right are acted upon synergistically by uncertainty which, in some important respects, increases rather than decreases as a result of research. Issues of rightness and wrongness, ethical issues, arise because the human beings who are subjects of medical screening and biological monitoring often have little or no option whether to be subjected to them. We identify issues of rightness and wrongness of biomedical surveillance for various purposes of occupational health and safety. We distinguish between social validity and scientific validity. We observe that principles are well established for scientific validity, but not for social validity. We support guidelines as a way forward.
PubMed ID
3772552 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among workers exposed to radon and thoron daughters at a niobium mine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26650
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Feb;11(1):7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
H M Solli
A. Andersen
E. Stranden
S. Langård
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1985 Feb;11(1):7-13
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology - mortality
Niobium - poisoning
Norway
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Radon - poisoning
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking
Thorium - poisoning
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of cancer among 318 male employees of a niobium mining company which was only operated between 1951 and 1965. Many of the workers, especially underground miners, were exposed to the daughters of radon and thoron and also to thorium. The accumulated doses to the workers from short-lived radon and thoron daughters in the mine atmosphere were assessed to be relatively low; up to 300 working-level months. During the follow-up period 1953-1981, 24 new cases of cancer were observed compared to an expected number of 22.8. Twelve cases of lung cancer had occurred versus 3.0 expected. Among the 77 miners, 9 cases of lung cancer were observed against 0.8 expected. Associations between the occurrence of lung cancer and exposure to alpha radiation and smoking were found. For the radon and thoron daughter exposure, about 50 excess cases per million person-years at risk per working-level month were observed.
PubMed ID
2986282 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232096
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;128(6):1266-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1988
Author
H I Morrison
R M Semenciw
Y. Mao
D T Wigle
Author Affiliation
Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Department of National Health and Welfare, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1988 Dec;128(6):1266-75
Date
Dec-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Mining
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - mortality
Newfoundland and Labrador
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Radon - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.
PubMed ID
3195567 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality experience of woodworkers, loggers, fishermen, farmers, and miners in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238043
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1985 Dec;69:163-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985
Author
R P Gallagher
W J Threlfall
P R Band
J J Spinelli
Source
Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1985 Dec;69:163-7
Date
Dec-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - mortality
British Columbia
Humans
Middle Aged
Mining
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Registries
Wood
Abstract
To evaluate occupational cancer mortality in British Columbia, we calculated the age-standardized proportional mortality ratios (PMR) and proportional cancer mortality ratios (PCMR) for 4,091 woodworkers, 5,457 loggers, 2,020 fishermen, 4,066 farmers, and 1,912 miners. Woodworkers 20-65 years old had significantly elevated risks of death from stomach cancer (PCMR = 128, P less than .01) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PCMR = 140, P less than .05). Loggers appear to have an elevated risk of death from nasal sinus tumors (PCMR = 364, P less than .05). Fishermen had an elevated risk of stomach cancer (PCMR = 168, P less than .01). Farmers in British Columbia appeared to have excess risks of stomach (PCMR = 136, P less than .01) and liver cancer (PCMR = 173, P less than .05), but decreased risk from lung cancer (PCMR = 76, P less than .01). Miners had an elevated risk of death from lung cancer (PCMR = 127, P less than .05) and primary eye tumors (PCMR = 569, P less than .05).
PubMed ID
3834326 View in PubMed
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171 records – page 1 of 18.